Facebook Lexicon Launches – Google Trends for Facebook

first_imgRelated Posts …and a comparable trend map from Google Trends: Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Product Reviews#web Facebook has just launched a neat new trend mapping tool, called Lexicon. Similar to Google Trends, it allows you to create a trend graph for different words and (two-word) phrases on Facebook Walls. It has a surprisingly slick UI too, with the scroll bar enabling you to zoom in and out to get different views of the trend line. You can compare up to 5 different trends by separating words/phrases with a comma. Although Lexicon compares favorably to Google Trends, it has some flaws. In our tests it had trouble with low frequency words (like “semantic”) and also it choked on “web 2.0” (“Invalid term: web 2.0. Check that each term is a single word or two-word phrase, and that each term uses only alphanumeric characters”). Also, to compare apples to apples, Google Trends has a wider range of data – including breakdowns by region, city and language.Here is an example of Lexicon:center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market richard macmanus In announcing this new service, Facebook was careful to emphasize that no privacy violations have occured:“We have a cluster of computers that count the number of occurrences of every term (for example, “juno”) across profile, group and event Walls every day. The system strips out all personally identifiable information so that there is no way to track a mention back to a specific person. No human at Facebook ever reads these Wall posts, and Lexicon does not look at personal messages, invitations, or any other private user-to-user communications.”Overall, it’s good to see Facebook mining some of the vast data that they have – but not stepping on sensitive privacy toes while doing so.last_img read more

Cartoon: A Thicker Skin

first_imgrob cottingham 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts So it’s happened again: a company comes under fire for some misdeed — perceived or actual — and gets a few critical comments on their Facebook Page. And their crisis communications strategy is to pour gasoline on that little flame by deleting those comments.The latest folks to do this are the people at ChapStick, who ran a print ad that offended a few folks. Those critics posted their complaints on ChapStick’s Facebook page (most of them quite civil). ChapStick’s page administrators then deleted the comments; this case adds an ironic new wrinkle because of the ad copy pointing people to their Facebook presence, which reads “Be heard.”After enduring a torrent of criticism for deleting the criticism, ChapStick posted an apology for the ad and a sort-of explanation for deleting the comments, saying they follow Facebook guidelines and “remove posts that use foul language, have repetitive messaging, those that are considered spam-like (multiple posts from a person within a short period of time) and are menacing to fans and employees.” Which, with most of the comments, wasn’t the case.It seems to bear repeating: brands, learn to take some criticism on your social web presences. Why? Because…Accusations of suppressing those comments are often more damaging than the original criticisms themselves.The presence of critical comments gives the conversation happening on your Facebook Page, blog or other presence a sense of authenticity. That means the positive user comments carry more weight than they would if your site had nothing but obsequious flattery.A critical comment can be an opportunity for engagement on your part. It’s your chance to answer a criticism, resolve a complaint, correct some misinformation. And you may be catching a little issue before it becomes a much bigger one.A critical comment can be an spur to participation and conversation by your community. Let’s face it; for most brands and organizations, excess participation usually isn’t the problem with their Facebook pages.So maybe it’s time to learn to love the negative. A thicker skin not only saves you from the sting of a little criticism; it can let you realize from genuine benefit… and keep you from becoming the latest high-profile case study in why comment deletion can backfire.See more of Rob’s Noise to Signal cartoons herecenter_img Tags:#Cartoons#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more