Watch Vulfpeck’s Rockin’ Performance of ‘1612’ From Last Night’s Colbert Show

first_imgOn Friday, November 20th, Vulfpeck played the entire episode of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert. As promised, they recorded a full song to release as a web-only clip. Antwaun Stanley joined the instrumentalists for a fan-favorite bust-out “1612” from their 2014 album Fugue State. If you haven’t heard their most recent album Thrill Of The Arts, we highly recommend you get on it and put it in your back pocket.Vulfpeck will be performing at the Brooklyn Bowl in NYC this upcoming Saturday and Monday. Monday night’s performance will include Lettuce’s Adam Deitch. Tickets sold out very quickly, however, the funketeers recently announced a show at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO this summer with The Motet and Medeski Martin & Wood. Find out more here.last_img read more

New exhibit traces women in business at Harvard

first_imgIn its earliest years, the opening of business courses to women was dubbed a “daring experiment” by one Harvard faculty member. It turned out to be a successful experiment as well, one that slowly evolved into the mainstream at Harvard Business School (HBS).“A ‘Daring Experiment’: Harvard and Business Education for Women,” a new exhibit at the School’s Baker Library | Bloomberg Center, traces women’s business curriculum at the University. Beginnings were modest. In 1937, Radcliffe College administered a certificate program in personnel administration, with guidance from HBS faculty and courses. Later the program developed into a joint effort between Radcliffe and HBS. In April 1963, the first woman accepted admission to the M.B.A. class that would graduate in 1965.One HBS graduate attending the 2008 Dynamic Women in Business Conference called the exhibit an example of dedication. “It really reminds you of the power a small group of women could have” said Melissa Hayes, HBS ’07, former co-president of the HBS Women’s Student Association. “HBS recognized that it had a big void by not having women there.”The Baker Library | Bloomberg Center exhibit uses archival material from both the Business School and from Radcliffe’s Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library — photos and printed material, along with audio and video interviews with alumni. Gallery talks with the show’s guest curator will be held at 4 p.m., (today) Feb. 7 and March 6. The exhibit runs through May 16. For more information visit http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/daring/.last_img read more

Where Are The New Age Stars To Take Over From Federer, Nadal and Djokovic?

first_imgAdvertisement 2pNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsrf3y9Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ecfcsc( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 90nWould you ever consider trying this?😱d1oCan your students do this? 🌚wjg7Roller skating! Powered by Firework Marin Cilic, who turned 30 on Friday, makes history as he becomes the youngest Grand Slam champion still active in the men’s tennis circuit – the most unexpected, and improbable, phenomenon in the sport’s history. As of Sept. 28, no men’s tennis player under the age of 30 has won a major. This has never occurred before in the sport. Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Stan Wawrinka, Juan Martin Del Potro, and now Cilic are all over 30.Advertisement According to data since 1930 from the ATP World Tour, male pros ages 30 and up own all the major singles titles won by currently active players. When one ponders upon this, it isn’t that difficult to visualize how unusual this fact is, both when thinking about individual players’ careers and also when thinking about the structural changes in the sport. Although advances in technology and healthcare have made it possible to play elite tennis for longer, those shifts alone cannot account for the severity of this over-30 situation. Men’s tennis never used to be this way. The winners have usually been young and dominant. From 1955 through 1966, men under age 30 won 48 consecutive major titles, the longest streak on record.The next longest streak of major titles won by 30-somethings happened back in 1969, when Rod Laver set it by himself, winning all four major titles at ages 30 and 31. Other than that, every season from 1925 through 2016 had at least two Slam winners under 30. Fast forward to recent times, the young still ruled after that, with Nadal, Djokovic and Murray winning most of the titles. But then a funny thing happened: Federer and his younger rivals, Nadal and Djokovic, kept thrashing opponents and winning majors, no matter their ages. All this could be very ominous for the men’s game, a sign the kids are hopeless.Advertisement Accepting that these present masters of the sport are gifted geniuses seems convincing enough just because millennials lack multiple things that those hard hitters didn’t, viz being motivated by their rivals’ achievements, using others’ wins as inspiration to improve their tactics, technique and conditioning. But whatever happens, the chance of any generation matching them in the future is slim – and perhaps impossible.Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Health hub on the way

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS PAKENHAM’S health super centre is one step closer to beginning construction. Monash Health has appointed a builder…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Tributes flow

first_imgBy Helena Adeloju Police and Cardinia Life have paid tribute to a colleague and friend after Pakenham Upper resident Sergeant…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img