Solskjaer won’t use 1999 triumph for motivation ahead of Nou Camp return

first_imgOle Gunnar Solskjaer will not hark back to the 1999 Champions League final in his team-talks when Manchester United attempt to overturn their deficit in Barcelona on Tuesday.The Nou Camp holds a special place in the hearts of United supporters as well as Solskjaer, whose last-gasp strike at the ground helped United to their second European Cup and an unforgettable treble haul.What happened nearly 20 years ago is almost certain to be a point of reference ahead of the return leg of United’s quarter-final against the Spanish champions.But Red Devils manager Solskjaer feels there are few parallels to draw from and will instead use the current crop’s wins at Juventus and Paris St Germain this season in an effort to motivate his side, who lost 1-0 at Old Trafford last Wednesday.Asked whether he will speak to his players about 1999, the Norwegian said: “No I won’t because it was against Bayern Munich, it was a final, it was different.“We will use the PSG (match), we will use Juventus away, we have beaten some good teams away from home this year, and played against some great players.“We had (Barcelona) flustered at times here as well. Yes, they controlled the game towards the end, they had the possession but they never really bothered us in our own half.”United trailed by two goals at the halfway stage against PSG but rallied at the Parc des Princes to book their spot in the last eight and a showdown against Barca.And Solskjaer is confident that, with the likes of Marcus Rashford, Anthony Martial and Paul Pogba at his disposal, there is enough quality within United’s ranks to spring another surprise.He added: “You look at the quality of those players and that gives us a threat, we carry a goal threat.“But of course what we did against PSG as a team must give everyone a huge confidence boost because that experience was probably the best they have had for many years, those players.“They are probably dreaming about another one of them again at the Nou Camp.”last_img read more

DNA of cats is deciphered

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Richard Gibbs of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who led a team that decoded the DNA of a monkey called the rhesus macaque, called the new work “a good outline” of cat DNA. Scientists are looking forward to the complete version, which will be useful for making detailed comparisons to the DNA of other animals, he said. The full complement of an organism’s DNA is called its genome. In cats, as in people, it’s made up of nearly 3billion building blocks. The sequence of those blocks spells out the hereditary information, just as strings of letters spell out sentences. Decoding a genome, which is called sequencing, means identifying the order of the building blocks. The new work identified 20,285 genes in the cat, probably about 95percent of the animal’s full complement, O’Brien said. That’s similar to the 20,000-25,000 genes estimated for humans. NEW YORK – An Abyssinian cat from Missouri named Cinnamon has just made scientific history. Researchers have largely decoded her DNA, a step that may aid the search for treatments for both feline and human diseases. The report adds cats to roughly two dozen mammals whose DNA has been unraveled, a list that includes dogs, chimps, rats, mice, cows and of course, people. Why add cats? They get more than 200 diseases that resemble human illnesses, and knowing the details of their genetic makeup should help in the search for vaccines and treatments, researchers say. The list includes a cat version of AIDS, SARS, diabetes, retinal disease and spina bifida, said Stephen J. O’Brien of the National Cancer Institute. The new work is reported in the November issue of the journal Genome Research by a team including O’Brien and colleague Joan Pontius. It covers about two-thirds of the DNA of Cinnamon, a research cat that lives at the University of Missouri in Columbia; more complete results are expected next year, O’Brien said. last_img read more