Takeaways from Demystifying Eye Tracking for UX Research

first_imgAt today’s User Experience Professionals Association webinar, Laura Rivera shared her lessons learned from eye tracking research. Rivera is a user experience (UX) researcher at Facebook and has been instrumental in getting their eye tracking capabilities fine-tuned for mobile. Here are my takeaways from her presentation. Why You Should Use Eye TrackingWhile there are many other UX research methodologies, eye tracking helps your answer questions by directly measuring someone’s behavior. For example, how would you know if a user is looking at a specific area without eye tracking?The think aloud method would never reveal it.Eye tracking allows you to discover:Where is someone looking?How long did they look at it?Did the fixate on it?Did they read itEye Tracking Can Be IntimidatingWhen UX researchers consider eye tracking, their first thought is that it’s intimidating. And that’s how Rivera first thought of it. It takes considerable time to conduct the research and then do rigorous time-intensive analysis.But Rivera pointed out that you can use eye tracking in a qualitative manner, which is less time-consuming and less difficult. Lessons Learned From Eye TrackingDo your homework.Talk with other researchers who’ve conducting eye tracking research. Review eye tracking resources, including Eye Tracking in User Experience Design by Jennifer Romano, Andrew Schall and Eye Tracking the User Experience by Aga Bojko.Consider the equipment and software you’ll be using.Check out the different options for eye tracking (Rivera has used Tobii for her research). Consider what you will use for desktop vs mobile eye tracking. Choose your study wisely.Consider your questions, the platform you’re testing on, and areas of interest. You’ll also need to decide when not to conduct eye tracking.Give yourself enough time to conduct eye tracking.It takes time to set up eye tracking. You’ll need to test the equipment,software, to ensure everything is working as expected. Conduct a pilot run. Allow extra time for analysis. Here’s an example of an eye tracking schedule over a two week period. In the first week, on Monday: finalize research plan; on Tuesday: set up/conduct pilot session; on Wednesday: test analyses/revise as needed; on Thursday and Friday: conduct sessions.In the second week, on Monday through Wednesday: conduct analysis; on Thursday and Friday: report findings. Make backup plans.Have extra participants (for your pilot and regular sessions). Create a backup usability protocol, in case your equipment or application doesn’t work. Livestream your sessions to stakeholders. Ask someone on your team to score participants for you (really helpful to better understand if the participant saw the message, read the message, acted on the message, include any meaningful notes)Consider logistics.Use a stationary chair, not a rolling chair (rolling chairs make it difficult to calibrate someone’s eyes, and then the participant moves the chair back). Consider a divider screen, if you think the participant will look at you during the session. Plan ahead.Don’t panic if something doesn’t go as expected. Have a backup plan in place. The webinar will be posted, with captions, in about a week. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedEye Tracking: How Your Eyes Move on a Website [Infographic]Given the two eye tracking events in the Detroit area today (this morning’s demo and tonight’s presentation), I thought you might enjoy the eye tracking 101 infographic created for Crazy Egg by Simple Grain highlighting analysis results and design tips to improve website user experience. Key Takeaways 69% of users’…In “User experience”Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development News: July 14, 2017In this week’s web design and development news roundup, you’ll learn how to design for touch, find out about the accessibility of the future WordPress editor, discover new features coming to Google Forms, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish a post highlighting my favorite…In “Web design & development links”Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development News: July 21, 2017In this week’s web design and development news roundup, you’ll learn how to make your videos accessible, discover how to implement webmentions, get an inside look of the WordPress Theme Review Team, and more. If you’re new to my blog, each Friday I publish a post highlighting my favorite user…In “Web design & development links”last_img

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