Pharmalittle: Novartis faces dilemma with a drug; PDUFA going nowhere fast?

first_img Good morning, everyone, and welcome to the middle of the week. Congratulations on making it this far and remember, there are only a few more days until the weekend arrives. So keep plugging away. After all, what are the alternatives? While you ponder the possibilities, we invite you to join us for a delightful cup of stimulation. Our flavor today is mocha nut fudge. Remember that no prescription is required. Meanwhile, here is the latest menu of tidbits to help you on your way. Have a wonderful day and please do stay in touch …Novartis recently discovered a drug it sells for rare inflammatory disorders could be used to treat a more common ailment, but there’s a problem: the $16,000-per-dose price tag, The Wall Street Journal says. Sold as Ilaris, a recent clinical trial suggests it can reduce the risk of serious complications in heart attack patients. But if it wins regulatory approval, Novartis would have to drastically cut its price to make it competitive with other cardiovascular drugs. By Ed Silverman July 12, 2017 Reprints Ed Silverman Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints [email protected] @Pharmalot What’s included?center_img Log In | Learn More Pharmalittle: Novartis faces dilemma with a drug; PDUFA going nowhere fast? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED Tags pharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+ Pharmalot Alex Hogan/STAT What is it?last_img read more

Sequencing patients’ genomes might not break the health care bank, study finds

first_img STAT+: Medical costs for the cardiology patients who had whole-genome sequencing averaged $8,109 for the six months that the researchers followed them, which was less than the $9,670 costs for those who had a family medical history.advertisement Please enter a valid email address. BusinessSequencing patients’ genomes might not break the health care bank, study finds Sharon Begley Exclusive analysis of biopharma, health policy, and the life sciences. [email protected] Leave this field empty if you’re human: “If someone has whole-genome sequencing and it finds low-penetrant mutations,” those that might or might not cause disease, “all the problems of endless testing can occur,” said molecular geneticist Madhuri Hegde, chief scientific officer of global lab testing at PerkinElmer Inc. and an expert on genetic testing, who was not involved in the study. It’s particularly critical, she said, not to order tests, or panic, when a patient has what’s called a variant of unknown significance, meaning studies are ambiguous about whether it causes disease.“That’s why genetic counseling is so important,” Hegde said. “Physicians need to stick to giving medical advice and have genetic counselors interpret genetic results.”That’s easier said than done, however, since the U.S. has a shortage of genetic counselors. In the new study, the physicians all had access to a genome resource center, as well as knowledgeable academic colleagues, to help them interpret sequencing results.Only a study that enrolls more patients and follows them longer, and that uses community physicians rather than academic ones, who don’t have special access to genome expertise, can tell whether the encouraging results are likely to be true in general. Christensen and his colleagues plan to follow more patients for at least five years.It’s even possible that widespread genome sequencing could save money for the health care system. “If you can identify individuals who are asymptomatic but have an actionable mutation,” such as one causing breast or colorectal cancer, Hegde said, “you can do prophylactic surgery or increased screening, and probably save a lot of dollars” if the person never develops cancer. @sxbegle Privacy Policy That counterintuitive finding was probably the result of a couple of the heart patients in the family medical history group being hospitalized for reasons unrelated to their participation in the study, Christensen said. Excluding hospitalizations, costs for the sequencing group averaged $5,392 compared to $4,692 for the family history group. Their number of doctor visits (7.8 vs. 7.2) was comparable, though those who were sequenced averaged 9.5 outpatient lab tests compared to 6.9 for the family history group.The spending difference isn’t nothing, of course, and multiplied by hundreds of millions of people (if genome sequencing becomes as routine as, say, cholesterol tests) would add up to billions of dollars. But sequencing is a one-time cost, not a recurring one. In the study the sequencing, including interpreting the results, cost about $5,000, and that has been falling quickly.Overall, said medical geneticist and co-author Dr. Robert Green of Brigham and Women’s, “downstream medical costs of sequencing may be far more modest than the common narrative suggests.” Green leads the MedSeq project, which studies how genome sequencing can be integrated into clinical practice.The modest downstream costs cannot be explained by the sequencing not finding any red flags: 18 percent of the healthy patients had a genetic variant that was known to cause disease or likely to do so. Of the cardiology patients, half had a variant associated with heart disease and 16 percent had one or more associated with another disorder.The physicians in the study “seem to be responding responsibly” to the sequencing results, Christensen said, not ordering countless follow-up tests or frequent screening out of fear that they’ll miss signs of the disease the patient is at risk for.Whether every physician would react that way is unclear, however. Surveys show that doctors are not well-versed in genetics or statistics. That has spurred concern that they’ll assume the worst of genetic variants that experts classify as possibly (but far from definitely) pathogenic or of unknown significance, and order endless, costly screening and other tests out of an abundance of caution or defensive medicine. About the Author Reprints NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. By Sharon Begley March 22, 2018 Reprints The first rigorous study of its kind finds that sequencing people’s genomes might not lead to extensive and expensive follow-up care, researchers reported on Thursday.“That’s been the critical question that has the field [of medical genetics] very concerned: Will whole-genome sequencing drive up downstream costs?” said Kurt Christensen of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, lead author of the study in Genetics in Medicine.To find out, he and his colleagues recruited 100 healthy adults and 100 patients with cardiomyopathy, assigning roughly half of each group to undergo whole-genome sequencing and the other half to have a review of their family medical history. The researchers followed the volunteers for six months after they and their physicians received the sequencing or family history results, reasoning that if people were told they had a genetic variant that increased the chance of having, say, a rare liver ailment, then they would seek further testing right away.advertisement Over that period, the healthy volunteers who had genome sequencing incurred slightly higher medical costs of $3,670, on average, compared to $2,989 for those who had just a basic family medical history. The two groups had fairly similar numbers of outpatient lab tests (5.5 vs. 4.4) and doctor visits (8.4 vs. 6.9). Adobe Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Tags geneticsresearchlast_img read more

Something Ventured: Vor Biopharma and 3 other startups got venture funding a year ago. Did it help them do what they said it would?

first_img By Kate Sheridan March 2, 2020 Reprints Something Ventured: Vor Biopharma and 3 other startups got venture funding a year ago. Did it help them do what they said it would? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Hyacinth Empinado/STAT General Assignment Reporter Kate covers biotech startups and the venture capital firms that back them. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED This story is part of STAT’s quarterly series Something Ventured, which looks at early-stage startups. You can read the earlier stories in the series here. Every quarter, the CEO of a public biotech company can expect to spend an hour or two on the phone, describing her company’s progress to shareholders and reporters and answering questions from analysts. @sheridan_kate [email protected] center_img About the Author Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Something Ventured Kate Sheridan Log In | Learn More What’s included? What is it? Tags biotechnologyBostonfinanceSTAT+last_img read more

President Hu! Stop Sending back the Defectors

first_img Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR [imText1]North Korean Human rights organizations are using Chinese President Hu Jintao visit to Seoul to call upon the Chinese government to stop the enforced repatriation of North Korean defectors.The “International Campaign to Block the Repatriation of the North Korean Refugees (International Campaign),” which consists of 59 domestic organizations, had a prayer meeting for North Korean defectors and a gathering for blocking the repatriation of the North Korean refugees on the 25th in Cheonggye square, Seoul. They pointed out that China has to stop the repatriation of North Korean refugees in order to earn more respect from international society after the Beijing Olympics.In a public letter to President Hu, the International Campaign emphasized that “There are 150 to 300 defectors arrested by Chinese police and repatriated to North Korea every week. They are getting falsely charged with betraying the country and suffering torture, beatings, slave labor, imprisonment in political prison camps and even public executions.”Also, the International Campaign pointed out that “International society has a bad feeling about China’s repatriation of North Korean defectors. We hope China can behave like a country that respects human rights after the experience of hosting an Olympics.”Meanwhile, Cho Hye Jin is a protestor who is on hunger strike in front of the Chinese Embassy to the United States in Washington D.C. Pastor Choi Choong Ha, who met Cho, said, “Cho Hye Jin is planning to go on with the hunger strike after her blackout… This gathering today also means we are with Cho Hye Jin.” A representative of “North Korean Defector’s Solidarity” Han Chang Kwon appealed to the Chinese government, “The Chinese government has to stop the human trafficking of North Korean female defectors. The release of North Korean human rights activists including Oh Young Sun, who has been in prison for four years for helping the defectors, should be considered.”Kim Kyu Ho, secretary general from Christian NGO announced that “We are planning to send this letter to Chinese President Hu Jintao via the Blue House.” President Hu! Stop Sending back the Defectors Facebook Twitter News Newscenter_img By Daily NK – 2008.08.26 4:19pm News AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] SHARE News There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest last_img read more

North Korea sends engineering apprentices to China, skirting international sanctions

first_img SHARE By Kim Song Il – 2018.11.21 4:59pm Facebook Twitter News NewsEconomy News North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img North Korea sends engineering apprentices to China, skirting international sanctions Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders AvatarKim Song Il US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again News Hundreds of North Korean women were seen carrying bags through the northeast Chinese city of Helong. Taken in April 2017. Image: Daily NKDespite the restrictions placed on North Korea’s foreign currency-earning activities, the regime has found a way around the sanctions that allows them to send North Korean laborers abroad.“At the end of October, I saw around 100 laborers heading to China and I asked one of them where all of them were going. He said that many laborers are going abroad despite the sanctions,” said a North Hamgyong Province-based source on November 13. “They are working as ‘engineering apprentices’ in a Chinese factory.” “There is a high possibility that the laborers are going to Hunchun or Tumen, which is where many laborers have gone in the past,” the source added.Engineering apprentices refer to laborers at North Korean factories or enterprises who are given the opportunity to train in the role over a fixed period. They are similar to South Korean university students who attend night school. “The laborers heading to China had all worked in factories in China in the past,” said the source. “They renew their Chinese visas after a month of work by heading back to North Korea, before returning to China.” These activities, however, are aimed at skirting the prohibition of labor export under UN Resolution 2371. North Korea appears to be sending its laborers abroad as “students” in a way that skirts sanctions and allows the regime to continue to earn foreign currency. This activity is likely the result of a “deal” between the regime and foreign currency-earning enterprises together with the Chinese authorities as all three parties would need to understand the arrangement.North Korean workers at a sewing factory in Dandong City, Liaoning Province, China. Taken in September 2017. Image: Daily NKA source in China close to North Korean affairs told Daily NK that it is an attempt to skirt international sanctions. “North Korean trading companies, in concert with the North Korean authorities, have found a way to send human resources abroad by referring to the laborers as ‘engineering apprentices,’ he said, adding that the Chinese authorities have quietly accepted this state of affairs.” “Chinese enterprises are also supporting the import of North Korean laborers through such methods because there is a major gap in wages between Chinese and North Korean wages,” he added.North Korean laborers in China are receiving lower wages than in the past and are faced with backbreaking levels of work.  “North Korean managers tell the laborers that because they have to work every day, they have to take their rest days during their return to North Korea to renew their visas,” a separate source based in China told Daily NK. “These apprentices get less money than regular laborers and are given the same levels of work, so the only people benefiting from all of this are the managers.” last_img read more

Wealth One appoints CFO

first_img Toronto-based Wealth One Bank of Canada on Wednesday announced the appointment of Shirley Chen as chief financial officer. Chen brings with her more than 15 years of financial management experience, and has held progressively senior positions in the areas of finance and treasury. Most recently, she served as the treasurer at Mogo Finance Technology Inc., one of Canada’s fastest growing financial technology companies. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning Related news Prior to Mogo, Chen served as the vice president, treasury at Street Capital Financial, and was the director, finance at ING Direct Bank of Canada. She is a chartered professional accountant and charted financial analyst with a master of business administration (finance) from Nankai University, China. “We are pleased to welcome Shirley Chen, who brings extensive financial experience and a proven track record of supporting companies growth strategies,” says Rubina Havlin, president and CEO. “As Wealth One expands operations we continue to attract top-talent, like Shirley, who will contribute to our ongoing commitment to our clients.” CETFA elects new board leadercenter_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Appointments,  Banking industryCompanies Wealth One Bank of Canada IE Staff PenderFund names new SVP for investmentslast_img read more

Covid-19 is new, but crisis-based scams are not

first_imgred warning flag on a stormy beach kmiragaya/123RF Keywords Pandemics,  Coronavirus,  FraudCompanies Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, North American Securities Administrators Association Retail trading surge on regulators’ radar, Vingoe says DoJ launches task force to tackle Covid-19 fraud Amid the ongoing threat of Covid-19-related investment scams, the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Inc. (FINRA) and North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) are issuing a joint warning to investors.“With the world focused on the Covid-19 pandemic, fraudsters continue to peddle supposed miracle cures or purportedly innovative technologies are preying upon unsuspecting investors,” the warning said. The regulators said that investors should be wary of schemes, being touted online and via social media, that claim to be raising capital for companies that are combatting Covid-19.These schemes may include offerings that involve limited partnerships, stock, private placements, initial coin offerings (ICOs) or other crypto-related investments, or crowdfunding investments.Many of the pandemic-related schemes uncovered by state and provincial regulators aim to capitalize on investor fear and anxiety, “by promoting safe returns independent of the stock market and the economy,” the regulators noted.They also aim to jump on trends, such as cryptoassets or complex investment programs involving foreign currencies, that are “very unfamiliar to most inexperienced retail investors.”These schemes often promise “passive income” or monthly “cash flow” that may appeal to investors suffering due to the economic fallout from the pandemic, and they often misrepresent the risks, the two regulators said.Even when offerings are legal, investors should remember that many are highly speculative, they noted.Among other things, the alert advises investors to do their research before investing and not to risk money that they can’t afford to lose. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Imposters among us, CSA warns Related news James Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Newly elected Guild National President invites industry to reconnect at APP2021

first_imgNewly elected Guild National President invites industry to reconnect at APP2021 The Pharmacy Guild of Australia’s newly elected National President, Professor Trent Twomey, today told pharmacy owners, pharmacists and pharmacy staff that he was looking forward to seeing them face-to-face at the Australian Pharmacy Professional Conference and Trade Exhibition (APP2021).“I look forward to reconnecting with my pharmacy industry colleagues face-to-face on the Gold Coast in May. It’s been a busy year for all of us, and I encourage pharmacists and pharmacy staff to take some time out to reconnect at what will be an exciting, but COVID Safe, event.“The APP2021 event organisers have gone above and beyond with COVID safe planning. It was also reassuring to hear Queensland’s Chief Health Officer, Dr. Jeannette Young, say on Friday that there’s no need for Queensland to go into lockdown with the current COVID-19 responses.”“I look forward to being in the same room as my colleagues during APP, where I will be providing updates on the 7CPA, the state of the industry, our expanding scope of practice as pharmacists and the COVID-19 vaccine rollout,” Prof. Twomey said.“I will also be providing a confidential update to Guild members at a closed breakfast session on Friday morning”.Kos Sclavos AM, APP2021 Chairman and former Guild National President, echoed Professor Twomey’s desire to catch up with pharmacy colleagues face-to-face and indicated that many in the industry feel the same.“Conference registrations are filling up quickly, which signals that our industry is keen to come together to network, reconnect and reflect on the year that was. ““APP may look a little different this year, but the event still promises a full social schedule with the Welcome Reception, Street Party and more.”“Attendees will once again enjoy Australia’s largest pharmacy trade exhibition, with an impressive 399 stands – 98% of trade stands have already been sold and the exhibition is sure to sell out soon.”“Attendees will also be treated to an unparalleled education experience with more than 60 sessions covering a diverse range of sessions. If you haven’t looked already, I encourage everyone to visit appconference.com.au and view the sessions on offer.”“The Hon Greg Hunt MP, Federal Minister for Health and Aged Care, is visiting the Gold Coast to address community pharmacies in the opening plenary and The Hon Mark Butler MP, Shadow Minister for Health and Aged Care, will also be addressing delegates on Thursday morning.”“I hope my pharmacy colleagues will take the time to attend APP and thank the Minister for the confidence he has shown in community pharmacy with relation to the key role we will play in COVID-19 vaccinations”.“We’ve seen many attendees recently booking to make the most of both the Federal Government’s $12 billion tourism support package which includes half-price domestic travel to the Gold Coast and the early bird pricing, which closes on Monday 29 March.”“With COVID vaccinations set to start 12 weeks from 22 March as per the Commonwealth Government’s rollout strategy, which takes us to 7 June, APP may be your only opportunity to get away and reconnect before millions of vaccines need to be administered.”“APP is the place to be. I look forward to seeing you all at APP2021 in just over eight weeks,” concluded Mr. Sclavos.For more details on the program and COVID safety, please visit www.appconference.com.About APP2021APP2021 will be held from 20-23 May 2021 at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre. The event is the largest pharmacy industry conference and trade exhibition in Australia and provides attendees with an opportunity to gain industry and product knowledge, meet with suppliers and network.While the education content is yet to be finalised, the program will feature over 100 industry and inspirational speakers covering sessions on industry and clinical updates, finance and business management topics, and professional presentations. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:aged care, Australia, Australian, Butler, commonwealth, conference, Exhibition, Federal, federal government, Gold Coast, Government, health, Pharmacy Guild of Australia, President, Queensland, younglast_img read more

K-12 Outreach, Diversity, Virtual Labs Among Topics At Frontiers In Education

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Nov. 2, 2003 More than 400 of the most creative people in engineering and computer science education will convene in Colorado Nov. 5-8 for Frontiers in Education, a national conference showcasing the latest innovations in the field. Outreach to K-12 schools to encourage more diversity in the study of engineering, integration of humanities and social sciences into the engineering curriculum, and the use of virtual laboratories for distance education will be among the topics discussed at this year’s conference hosted by the University of Colorado at Boulder. The theme of the conference is “Engineering as a Human Endeavor: Partnering Community, Academia, Government and Industry.” Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft are among the corporate sponsors who will join faculty and academic leaders at the forum. The conference is cosponsored by the American Society for Engineering Education and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. William Wulf, president of the National Academy of Engineering, will deliver the keynote address. Faculty from CU-Boulder, which is a leader in hands-on learning, undergraduate research and K-12 outreach, will be among those making presentations. CU-Boulder associate professors Melinda Piket-May and James Avery of electrical engineering, and James Sherman, assistant engineering dean for student services, are the conference co-chairs. Conference sessions will be held at the Westin Hotel in Westminster, with a special reception at CU-Boulder’s College of Engineering and Applied Science to showcase its unique educational facilities at the Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory and Discovery Learning Center. For more information and registration visit http://www.fie-conference.org/03/last_img read more

Marinus Smith awardees honored for making a difference

first_imgOn Friday, April 1, 20 staff and faculty members were recognized with the Marinus Smith Award during a reception hosted by New Student & Family Programs and CU Parents Association (CUPA). The awards were presented to the recipients by Jennifer McDuffie, director of New Student & Family Programs. The award is named after Marinus Smith, one of Boulder’s pioneer settlers who in 1874 not only led the way with a $1,000 donation toward the creation of the University in Boulder, he and his wife donated 25 acres for the university including the Norlin Quadrangle.  Nominations for the award are submitted by students or in some cases, a student’s family member. In the call for nominations, students are asked to consider a person who had a considerable impact on their life while attending CU-Boulder. Submitting a nomination provides a meaningful way for students and their families to say “thank you” to outstanding staff and faculty members who have taken the time to show care and concern for those they serve. The nomination process closes in early spring and nominations for 2016-2017 will open in the fall. Staff and faculty members are eligible to be nominated each school year and several 2015-2016 recipients have been previously honored with a Marinus Smith Award. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail “Our theme for the Marinus Smith Awards is Making a Difference,” said McDuffie. “Recipients will join a long line of Marinus Smith Award winners who have impacted students and the university.” Published: April 4, 2016 The Marinus Smith Recognition Awards are presented each spring to select CU-Boulder teachers, advisors and staff who made a significant, positive impact on the lives of CU-Boulder students.  The following are the 2016 honorees: Kimberly Bunning, Master Teacher at CU TeachJennifer Burnham, Special Programs Manager, Continuing EducationHeidi Bustamante, Instructor, Integrative PhysiologyInga Calvin, Lecturer, Sewall Residential Academic ProgramAndrew Chapman, Lecturer, PhilosophyAnne Dougherty, Associate Department Chair, Applied MathematicsAngela Thieman Dino, Faculty, College of Engineering and Applied ScienceScot Douglass, Associate Professor, College of Engineering and Applied ScienceMichael Dubson, Senior Instructor, PhysicsHans Foote, Senior Case Manager, Student AffairsCarlos Garcia, Executive Director, University Memorial CenterSusan Hendrickson, Senior Instructor, Chemistry & BiochemistrySteve Hobbs, Instructor, Integrative PhysiologyRodger Kram, PhD, Associate Professor, Integrative PhysiologyBarbara Loo, Occupancy Management Program Manager, Housing & Dining ServicesSuzanne Nelson, Instructor, Integrative PhysiologyKathleen Corcoran Noonan, General Professional III, Academic Advising CenterMichael Shernick, Program Coordinator, Libby Residence Academic ProgramAlison Vigers, Instructor, Health Residential Academic ProgramMichael Zizzi, Lecturer, The Program for Writing & Rhetoric Categories:AcademicsCampus Communitylast_img read more