Panic Disorder

first_imgSome health issues cannot be seen, they are the silent sufferings that are felt with the heart and battled with the mind. It could be a stranger, it could be a friend, it could be you. It is me. Last Wednesday, October 10, was World Mental Health Day and in acknowledgement of that day, I am breaking a very personal story to my readers, in hopes it gives strength to others. I suffer from panic disorder.Panic attacks are classified as a mental health disorder. They are not anxiety attacks, which are short lived and onset by a particular stressor. Panic attacks are unprovoked, unpredictable, and can even occur when waking up. Anxiety Disorder is the most common mental health issue in America, affecting 40 million adults (18.1 percent), in that number six million (2.7 percent) have panic disorder (PD). Women, unfortunately, are twice as likely to be affected than men.This is my story.“I am present, I am here, this is real.” This is the mantra I’ve repeated to myself more times than I’d like to admit over the course of my life. I’ve been hiding in the shadows, but now’s the time to step out of the darkness and shine light on the real issue. I struggle with panic attacks nearly every single day. Inhale, exhale. Life’s most basic function has become my biggest burden. Many mornings I wake up afraid to take my next breath, each gasp of air becoming a cognitive chore.When I was seven years old, my mother took me to St. Lucia for our first mother-daughter trip and scheduled my first (and only) scuba diving lesson. Unfamiliar with the breathing techniques while using the air tanks, I panicked. I became faint and fearful I wouldn’t get enough air. As memories fade and blend together, this single moment became an irreversible turning-point in my life. I developed anxiety associated with getting enough oxygen. My life was never the same.Slumber parties, a young girl’s favorite pastime filled with friends, were a dreaded invite. I distinctly remember calling my mother several times from my peers’ houses at odd hours of the night to pick me up. “It’s happening. I’m scared. Can you come get me?” It socially isolated me, “the girl who couldn’t spend the night without her mommy.” I was ashamed.As the months rolled on, so did my emotional triggers. I feared the onset of another attack, thus developing into the classification of panic disorder. Time off from school frightened me, vacation time meant more hours of the day where my mind would wander. I couldn’t be alone with my own thoughts; I needed a distraction. It was all happening so fast. Eventually, any place related to darkness became a call for distress. Then, the worst happened. In a plateau of events, I feared the moment the sun went down, and winter was a chilling reminder that the days were shortened. The darker the hour, the less “alive” the world felt. It became a cycle of isolation.Coming from a family where medication wasn’t the answer, I never sought medical help. This was a mental issue and therefore could be overcome naturally. So, up until I was 17, I had my rituals. Everywhere I went I would map out the nearest hospital and keep relatives’ phone numbers on hand in the event of a full-blown attack. These things provided me comfort, as every moment alive became an opportunity for paralyzing fear to strike. In time, each time, the attacks did dissipate and I never actually had to call an ambulance (though I came close several times). Meanwhile, I continued to travel with family, enjoyed nights out with friends, boyfriends, scholarly awards, and other life milestones. From the outside, I was completely normal. On the inside, I was in a near-constant state of panic, afraid of my own shadow.Upon a life-changing travel opportunity with an educational group, People To People, in 2006, I faced my fear and came back panic free. For over a decade, the attacks dissipated. Then, one cold night in December 2017, I awoke unable to breathe, dizzy, and in a sweat. The symptoms persisted and two weeks later I visited a doctor for the first time regarding my symptoms, to confirm what I was experiencing. I knew it all too well and was in disbelief at its return. To help, she gave me a small dose of Xanax to alleviate the pressure, to remind my body what it was like to be calm. It helped for two days, and a rare occasion since. But I still have most of those pills, on standby in case of a real emergency.Over time, the occurrence has become infrequent but the symptoms are terrifying. Like falling into a black hole, where the gravity continues to pull me in. I’m disconnected, disillusioned from all things I’ve known. I’m no longer real, life feels like another dimension I cannot touch. My chest continues to tighten, unable to get a full breath in. The hairs on my arms begin to stand. I feel faint. I question if I’m dying, so I place my palm in front of my lips to check if air is coming out. It is. Stand up, walk around, take a drive, call someone, anything to remind myself that I am connected to what’s around me. Every moment in it has become an irrational moment of fear.I am not a victim. My attacks do not define my life, they merely become moments of an additional breath. I’ve decided to share my story now in acknowledgement of the severity of this illness, gripping those in its path. It is an illness masked in smiles and silence. If you suffer, know you are not alone and you, too, will continue to find your strength.nicole@indyeastend.com@NikkiOnTheDaily Sharelast_img read more

IEEE Releases Report on Wake-Up Radio Technology Aimed at Increasing Battery Life for Wireless Devices

first_img An overview of IEEE 802.11ba Wake-Up Radio Near-and long-term use cases Market forecasts A comparison of IEEE Wake-Up Radio to other technologies A look at potential future developments Click here to learn more. IEEE has released the IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio. Wake-Up Radio is a breakthrough technology from the IEEE 802.11ba Standards Task Group that significantly extends the battery life of devices and sensors, particularly those that are part of the Internet of Things (IoT). With the projected growth of IoT devices exceeding 20 billion by 2020, Wake-Up Radio will greatly reduce the need for frequent recharging or replacement of batteries while still maintaining optimum device performance.Energy conservation is a critical requirement for the billions of future networked devices exclusively dependent on battery power with a target operational lifetime in excess of five years. These devices are expected to make up a substantial fraction of the Internet of Things market. IEEE P802.11ba – Wake Up Radio is a key enabling energy conserving technology for the markets they will serve, and this insightful report has been crafted to help stakeholders better understand the potential of the technology and market.From smart homes and smart warehouses, to logistics and transport, to wearable health-monitoring devices and more, achieving low-power, low-latency objectives are essential for organizations designing or using IoT devices. Wake-Up Radio, running on the common standard IEEE 802.11, offers solutions to overcome design challenges, and to meet the unique requirements for low-power and low-latency in a world of ubiquitous IoT device deployments.The IEEE Wake-Up Radio is an add-on to existing IEEE 802.11 radios that substantially improve power-saving performance of IEEE 802, removing the need to compromise between power savings and latency. This makes the technology suitable for a new class of battery-powered devices that will drive innovation and exciting new applications in the market.The IEEE Technology Report on Wake-Up Radio provides:last_img read more

Parker edges a close one

first_imgRichi Hurley is just back from a trip home to England and hadn’t played golf for a few months but it hasn’t affected his golf and he came third with a very steady thirty seven points.  Paul Pavloff took the fourth and last podium place today with thirty five points.  There were no ‘2’s today.1st Allan Parker (9) 39pts2nd Russell Gilroy (17) 39pts3rd Richi Hurley (7) 37pts4th Paul Pavloff (5) 35ptsTuesday, August 30, Mt. Shadow – StablefordWe hadn’t been to Mountain Shadow for a long time as the course had been in very poor condition the last time we played it.  However today it was almost up to its usual standard except for the greens being much slower than before, which seemed to have caught out a lot of our group and there were many three putts today.Again we were joined by our friends from the PFGS and one of their members took the top spot today.  Craig Hitchens was the man who came out on top of what was a day of bad scoring and won with thirty five points.  Frank McGowan took the second place with thirty points and a very surprised Russell Gilroy found that he had taken the third spot with twenty seven points.Once again we had no ‘2’s today.1st Craig Hitchens (14) 35pts2nd Frank McGowan (18) 30pts3rd Russell Gilroy (17) 27ptsThursday, Sept. 1, Burapha – StablefordWe decided to play two flights today here at Burapha, off the blue and white tees to make it enjoyable for everyone.  Again the course was deserted except for ourselves and it was another very fast round of golf.Craig Hitchens.Jon Batty took the honors in the blue flight and won with thirty five points.  Lyle Blaw has just returned for another visit and he came second with thirty.In the white flight Rod Crosswell was playing his first ever game with us and started in style by being a very clear winner with an excellent thirty nine points.  Russell Gilroy was five points behind Rod but he still got the second place with thirty four.  Rodney Nabbe also had thirty four but he lost the count back to Russell and had to settle for the third and last place and once again today we had no ‘2’s.Blue Flight1st Jon Batty (8) 35pts2nd Lyle Blaw (11) 30ptsWhite Flight1st Rod Crosswell (15) 39pts2nd Russell Gilroy (16) 34pts3rd Rod Nabbe (13) 34ptsNote: The Tara Court Golf Group play every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, leaving O’Gara’s Bar and Restaurant in the Tara Court on Pratamnak Rd. around 10.00 a.m.  Sign up either in O’Gara’s or ring Joe on 089 249 1364. IPGC Golf from the Tara Court Golf SocietySunday, August 28, Green Valley – StablefordOn the way out here today it was looking very much like rain but by the time we got to the course it had cleared up and turned out to be another beautiful day for golf.  We got round in what was probably a record time for golf on a Sunday and completed our round in three hours and fifteen minutes.  Low season is definitely better for golf!Allan Parker.Again the same consistent golfers battled it out for the top spot today with thirty nine points each, two better than last Sunday and again Allan Parker won the count back which went down to the last six holes.  For the second week in a row Russell Gilroy had to settle for the second place.  Both of these players having been playing great golf for the past few weeks.last_img read more

The worst Cristiano Ronaldo since 2010-11

first_img His next test in La Liga will be against rivals Atletico, at the Vicente Calderon next weekend. Sport EN Cristiano Ronaldo did not score for Real Madrid in the 0-0 draw with Malaga and the Portuguese hasn’t found the net in four of the five La Liga games this season. He still has five goals, but all of them came in a 6-0 win over a limp Espanyol side at the Cornella El Prat.  Against Malaga he tried to score time and time again, but could not. His discontent at being unable to beat Kameni was tangible. He tried to score an incredible 14 times, without success.  27/09/2015center_img CEST Upd. at 14:17 Against Sporting, Granada, Athletic and Malaga he has been incapable of finding the net. His run reminds us of the 2010-11 season where he had his worst goalscoring start as a player of Madrid, scoring three times in six weeks of La Liga. last_img read more

Memories of Joan

first_imgOBITUARY Joan Frances Carney (Drake) Born: 8 August 1933 Died: 2 July 2010 THE much-loved and respected Joan Carney passed…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img