Photo of the Week: Women’s March Ann Arbor

first_imgShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedMarch 2018 User Experience and Web Professional EventsWhether you’re a user experience or web professional, you know it can be a challenge to keep your skills up-to-date, learn about new methods, and network with fellow web workers. And it takes time to find interesting local events. That’s why I publish a monthly calendar of user experience and…In “Calendar”March 2017 User Experience and Web Professional EventsWhether you’re a user experience or web professional, you know it can be a challenge to keep your skills up-to-date, learn about new methods, and network with fellow web workers. And it takes time to find interesting local events. That’s why I publish a monthly calendar of user experience and…In “Calendar”World Information Architecture Day Ann Arbor Returns on February 23Back for its eighth year, World Information Architecture (IA) Day Ann Arbor is the annual one-day conference created by the Information Architecture Institute and produced by local volunteers. Organized by School of Information students at the University of Michigan, this year’s event with the theme “Design for Difference” will be…In “Conference” Women’s March Ann Arbor marchers gather at the University of Michigan DiagAlong with thousands of other men, women, and children (MLive reported 11,000 people attended), I joined the Women’s March in Ann Arbor yesterday to march in support of women’s rights, affordable health care, and civil rights.I was proud to be part of a march that joined hundreds of Women’s Marches around the world, on every continent including Antarctica. Unexpectedly warm weather in the 50’s greeted marchers as they gathered in Ann Arbor, Michigan near the Federal Building before the start of the march.At the march and rally, I met young and old: college students, parents, grandparents, and children from Ann Arbor, St. Clair Shores, Dearborn, Ypsilanti, and Chelsea.We chatted about our reasons for being at the march: to join in solidarity to show the world, no matter our race, gender, religion, or sexuality, we will fight for women’s rights and civil rights.Despite thousands of people gathered at the corner of 5th and Liberty before the march, I was absolutely surprised to run into my friend Deb Nystrom near the Federal Building who used her artistic talents to create a sign to carry during the march.The handmade signs, uplifting conversations with fellow marchers as we walked to the University of Michigan Diag, and the speeches at the rally encouraging everyone to get involved left me with a positive, hopeful feeling as I left the march.It was wonderful to see the photos from my friends posted on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook as they joined marches around the world. Check them out online by searching for the womensmarch hashtag.Here are a few more of my photos from the march.last_img read more

Climate-change contrarian loses Australian funding

first_imgOnce the darling of Australia’s conservative government, controversial climate contrarian Bjørn Lomborg has lost his Down Under caché—and cash. Yesterday, education minister Simon Birmingham, told a Senate committee that the government had withdrawn its offer of $3 million toward establishing an Australian version of Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus Center.The government of former Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who in 2009 dismissed climate change as “absolute crap,” had been keen to support an Australian Consensus Centre (ACC) that would conduct policy research on overseas aid, Australian prosperity, agriculture, and regional issues. Malcolm Turnbull replaced Abbott as leader of the Liberal Party on 15 September. Long in favor of action on climate change, Turnbull is gradually shifting the government’s course. Birmingham, appointed 19 September, told the committee that his predecessor, Christopher Pyne, had decided before the reshuffle that the “proposal was unlikely to enjoy success and that the funds could be better utilized elsewhere.” A spokesman for Lomborg told The Australian newspaper that it was “disappointing that a significant global research effort attracting top economists to look at development priorities will no longer be associated with Australia.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The ACC proposal had a bumpy ride from the beginning. The University of Western Australia (UWA) in Perth announced plans to host it last April. The revelation that the government would contribute funding to start the center and cover a third of its operating expenses triggered outrage from the scientific and academic communities. In the wake of the uproar, UWA Vice Chancellor Paul Johnson announced on 8 May with “great regret and disappointment” that he would cancel the center’s contract and return the money to the government. The Abbott government vowed to find another host institution; Flinders University, in Adelaide, was developing a proposal with Lomborg. The news about the loss of funding was “disappointing” to Colin Stirling, Flinders’ vice-chancellor said in a statement. “Universities should be places for contesting controversial issues without fear or favour,” he said.Although government money is off the table, Birmingham noted that if any university wished to work with Lomborg, “they should of course feel absolutely free to do so.”last_img read more