Three PH clubs in Asian tilt next year?

first_imgTaiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Dimakiling, Nouri shock Foreign GMs as Pinoy bets start strongly in Subic int’l tourney Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports The Philippines could have three clubs playing in Asian Football Confederation competitions next year, following the AFC’s decision to allot one slot to the country in the AFC Champions League preliminary round.Reigning United Football League champion Global FC will vie in the top club competition—the AFC Champions League—in the continent starting in January, while Ceres-La Salle will once again compete in the AFC Cup group stage.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus MOST READ Senators to proceed with review of VFA View comments Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young Global won’t have the luxury of time to prepare as it starts its bid against Singapore side Tampines Rovers on Jan. 24 at Rizal Memorial Stadium. The winner of the clash will travel to Australia for a Jan. 31 knockout match with A-League side Brisbane Roar. Chinese giants Shanghai Shenhua await the survivor of the game in Brisbane on Feb. 7 with the winner moving on to the main draw of the Champions League.Wanted: Foreign playersPalami said the club is still in the process of acquiring foreign players, as the likes of Omid Nazari, Milan Nikolic and Ivan Petrovic left Global after their championship winning season last October.If Global ends up playing in the second-tier competition, the AFC Cup, the Filipino side will be in Group F alongside Malaysian champion Johor Darul Tazim, Magwe of Myanmar and the winner between Boeung Ket Angkor of Cambodia and Lao Toyota of Laos in a playoff.Ceres landed in Group H with Vietnam league champ Ha Noi T and T, Felda United of Malaysia and Tampines Rovers of Singapore. If Tampines makes the Champions League main draw, Geylang International will take its place in the group.ADVERTISEMENT A third Philippine club—the Loyola Meralco Sparks—could make the AFC Cup, if Global qualifies for the main draw of the Champions League, where some of the biggest clubs in Australia, Japan, China, South Korea and the United Arab Emirates see action.The Sparks finished third in the UFL league competition this year.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliHonor“It’s a huge honor and a responsibility at the same time being the pioneering Philippine club in the Champions’ League,” said Global chief executive Dan Palami, who is also manager of the national men’s football team.“It’s going to be a tough journey since we’ll have to win three games before reaching the group stages. But I’m happy for Philippine football. Having a Philippine club in the Champions League is a testament to the growth and development of the sport in the country.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exerciselast_img read more

You don’t want vendor lock-in: 5 rules for a real world solution

first_imgIn my last blog post I pointed out you can never actually avoid vendor or technology lock-in. This is particularly applicable to the main cloud orchestration tool you use. You have to choose one orchestrator and will want to stay with that choice for quite some time. So, making the right choice is key.As long as clear standards have not emerged you will have to make a choice regarding which technology you implement. Such technology can be provided by a vendor, meaning you trust the vendor, or come from a consortium building open source tools. In that case you are betting that consortium will be a winner moving forward.For some technologies, there are two ways of looking at standards. The orchestration tool is actually an interesting one from that perspective. On the one hand you have the orchestrator itself allowing you to provision, de-provision and run services. On the other you have the configurator, which will explain to the orchestrator what needs to be done for each service. The orchestrator might be proprietary, but if you have a standardized configuration “language”, you are able to shift from one orchestrator to another if you wish to. To stick to my example, you have TOSCA for example standardizing the specification of service automation.Since you can’t ever be fully sure, it’s critical right from the initial choice to look at how the tools you use can interact with the external world. This will allow you down the road to integrate with other environments if your original choice does not turn out. Here are five pragmatic things you better check out early.1. Support of heterogeneous environments (hardware, operating systems and hypervisors)This one is particularly applicable if you choose an integrated cloud environment but should be checked in other situations also.Which server, storage and networking infrastructures are supported by the environment you choose? How easy is it to add infrastructure from a different type? Not only does this allow you to include some of your existing infrastructure in your cloud, but it leaves you the freedom to make alternative choices moving forward.Most applications today are built either on Windows or Linux, but some still use a variety of UNIX type operating systems or even private ones. What OS is used by the applications you are planning to move to the cloud and are those supported by your environment? This is a key question to evaluate.The third element to this step is the hypervisor. Today the majority of the market uses VMWare’s products. But we slowly see a shift to other hypervisors such as Hyper-V and KVM. Costs and technology factors play a role here. Don’t limit yourself to one hypervisor, but make sure your environment supports multiple, giving you the possibility to choose what is best for you. Even if your existing operational systems run on VMWare, maybe you want to use KVM for the development of new applications. Some development tools currently in the market actually allow you to automate the deployment of applications on multiple cloud environments. This allows you, for example, to use KVM for development and most of testing while you run VMWare in production, hence reducing license costs.2. The availability of APIsHow can I interact with the chosen technology? Can I trigger actions from other applications or portals without requiring manual intervention? What do the application programming interfaces (APIs) allow me to do? How well are they documented? How easy are they to set up and use? These questions are fundamental in ensuring the technology is open and gives me the flexibility to evolve as my needs change. A couple API standards are emerging (AWS and OpenStack), but they only address IaaS functionality at the moment. You’ll probably need more.Look at APIs from two ways: incoming and outgoing APIs. Can an external environment trigger an action using the technology and can the technology initiate an action that needs to be taken by an external environment? Here are a couple specific areas to look at:Can I perform all functions available in the portal through programmatic interactions?Do I have the possibility to integrate an external identification/access management environment?Can I integrate with my existing LDAP/Active Directory environment and use its information?Can I use an external approval environment to approve for example the provisioning by a user of a service?Can I integrate an external service in my catalog (we’ll talk more on that a little further in this blog post)This is a non-exhaustive list. Make sure you have yours prior making a choice.3. Template DesignsOrchestration uses templates to define what action to take. Those are typically designed using graphical user interfaces. Obviously, in case you decide to change orchestration tools, the last thing you want is to have to redesign the thousands of workflows or templates you designed. Hence the fact standards are emerging. The most documented one at the moment is TOSCA as I already mentioned. However, we are still in the early days, so we cannot be sure this is going to be it. So, make sure the technology you choose is clearly intended to support a standard. Support of TOSCA is a good proof point.4. Configuring external servicesI often highlight intermediation, aggregation and bursting in this blog. All three require a programmatic interaction with external systems. This implies interactions between the two environments. We already talked about the APIs, their documentation and what they would do. But there is another aspect to look at and this is how the external service can be integrated.Let me give an example. You want to integrate Salesforce.com in your catalog, allowing your users to request access to your CRM environment on Salesforce.com. You will need to describe the service in your catalog, define which users can request access and potentially identify an approval process and a price or charge back for the service. But then, you will need to make sure that, when a user places the request, this request is actually transmitted to Salesforce.com. You will define an orchestration template that will trigger the transfer of the request and check whether it actually succeeded or not. But then you will have to describe how Salesforce is actually triggered. You will use some of Salesforce’s APIs to perform this task. Salesforce makes its functionality available through SOAP and RESTful APIs as described in the documentation.  You will connect an action in your orchestration template with an XML string that is transferred using the API technology chosen. For each action you plan to perform, you will have to configure such action. This is how you build the integration. But obviously you only have to do that once for each external service you plan to integrate.Before choosing a technology, make sure you understand how this can be done, and how effective and secure the communication is.5. CustomizationThe last element to review is the level of customization that is offered. Over the years your users have become familiar with a specific vocabulary and a way of doing things. Can you adapt the portal and the other functionality exposed to the user to something familiar to them? Also remember the questions I raised earlier. You may have a specific identification and access mechanism. Can that one be integrated? You may have your own approval process mechanism; can that one be replicated or integrated? And I could go on like this.Assess how well you can customize the environment to your specific needs.  But at the same time, check whether you can keep the customization when moving from one version of the software to the next one. You don’t want to have to redo everything when you upgrade your software. And in the cloud environment, newer versions of the software are regularly released.ConclusionWhen choosing a specific technology you are locking yourself in, whether you want to or not. Moving to a different one will be painful. So, make sure you are taking the right bet. Choose a technology that allows you not just to address today’s needs, but to grow with them as they evolve. Keep my five rules in mind as they will help you find an environment that can grow with you. And that is probably the most important. Frankly, most often companies change technology because the existing one becomes a bottleneck. Make sure you do not have to do that.- ChristianChristian Verstraete is the Chief Technologist Cloud at HP and has over 30 years in the industry, working with customers all over the world, linking business and technology.Read more of Christian’s blogs herelast_img read more

Jaunti village set to become Delhi’s favourite tourist jaunt

first_imgA beautiful and historically-rich village on the outskirts of Delhi is being developed as a major tourist hotspot. Delhi Urban Arts Commission (DUAC), a body under the Ministry of Urban Development, is preparing a master plan for village Jaunti, nine kilometer from Kanjhawala in the northwest. This includes erecting ‘dwars’ (ornamental gates) to the hamlet bordering Haryana, charting heritage trails to its Mughal-era fort and talab, and streetscaping. Its traditional havelis (mansions) will also be an important feature in the tourist attraction plan.Jaunti is believed to have been established in the 17th century, during the reign of emperor Shahjahan. It is known far and wide for a ‘shikargah’ (hunting lodge) with an impressive brick pattern and a large adjoining talab (water tank).These are said to have been used by Shahjahan and successive Mughal kings on gaming expeditions when the village was densely forested and frequented by tigers and antelope. The village’s old core and by-lanes retain some havelis which have architecturally-rich facades. Jaunti also played a key role in the Green Revolution of 1960s when Dr MS Swaminathan planted the ‘Jounti Seed’ in the village.In 2014, Member of Parliament Dr Udit Raj adopted it under the Pradhan Mantri Adarsh Gram Yojana or Prime Minister’s Model Village Scheme. A team of town planners, heritage conservationists and village youth, led by the MP, have since been working on enhancing its physical features as well as uplifting it socially.Speaking to MAIL TODAY, Dr Raj said: “We chose Jaunti of all the villages in my (Delhi northwest) constituency as it is still a ‘rural village’, unspoilt by construction and pollution. Its small population size has also helped it remain beautiful.”advertisementDUAC Chairman Dr PSN Rao, who is now working on the ‘Mera Jaunti’ plan, said: “We have about three months at our disposal to complete the design. The aim is to finish it before November – the first anniversary of the launch of the Pradhan Mantri Adarsh Gram scheme.”A DUAC consultant, who is part of the project, said: “The village is highly inaccessible. One has to change buses twice even from the Rithala Metro station. We plan to put up ornamental dwars on all three approach roads to Jaunti – from Haryana, Nizampur and the main Kanjhawala Road. The heritage trails encompassing shikargah, pond, havelis and temples are being drawn. Streetscaping, developing lighting, signages and parking is also part of the plan.”Kiosks and camel rides are envisaged around the pond on the lines of Chokhi Dhani in Jaipur. Management of tourism around the pond could be handed over to Delhi Tourism and Transportation Development Corporation (DTTDC), Project Director Rekha Vohra said. “We have grand plans to empower the people of Jaunti. This area, which includes Nizampur village, has given the country an Arjuna awardee and gold medallist kabaddi player. An international sports academy will be set up. A 100-bedded hospital is coming up and agricultural education is being provided to farmers.””Embroidery training is being given to local women and they have been approached by international brands to work for them,” she added.last_img read more

Former female firefighter says she is to get official apology for discrimination

first_imgHALIFAX – A former firefighter says her 12-year battle against “systemic” gender discrimination has ended with a settlement that will see a public apology issued by the city of Halifax on Monday.In an interview Tuesday, Liane Tessier released details of an agreement that she says comes after years of complaints about abusive and disrespectful behaviour from her male counterparts.Tessier, who said other female firefighters have also come forward with concerns, said she hoped the settlement would signal that change is needed, especially in male-dominated professions.“Gender-based violence is not going to stop because of this apology,” said Tessier. “But hopefully my struggle, the settlement, and the apology will put other employers on notice as well.”Tessier said the settlement includes financial compensation and a commitment from the Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency service to implement eight policy changes that she suggested.She said they cover a range of things from keeping hiring statistics to making the workplace safer for women to speak out. The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission is to monitor to ensure the fire service is abiding by the policies, she said.A city spokesman wouldn’t immediately comment on the settlement, saying the issue remains before the rights commission.“We continue to work closely with the commission regarding next steps and will provide more details once they can be made available,” Brendan Elliott said in an email.The 53-year-old Tessier first complained in 2005 about gender discrimination at the Herring Cove fire station.In a 26-page statement given to The Canadian Press, Tessier alleges she was “ostracized” and was subjected to “malicious gossip” after she spoke out. The statement and its allegations are not part of the settlement and haven’t been proven in court.She said she formally complained to management and was referred to a human relations consultant who “minimized and denied” all harassment claims.Tessier subsequently filed a complaint with the provincial rights commission in 2007, but she said it languished in the investigation phase for almost five years before it was dismissed.Not giving up, Tessier filed for a judicial review and in 2014 the Nova Scotia Supreme Court ordered that the complaint be re-examined by the rights commission.The case was to have come before a public board of inquiry in October of this year.“What’s hard about this last 12 years is that I had to speak and fight for my basic rights,” Tessier said. “And then I was getting retaliated against and had to eventually leave a job that I loved.”Although certified as a training instructor and competing in the firefighter combat challenge for years, Tessier said she was also passed over for jobs that were given to men with less experience.Tessier said she believes her experience has taught her about the “huge” imbalance of power that still exists in many modern workplaces and leaves many women “terrified” to speak out.She said women who come forward are seen as “trouble-makers or too sensitive,” while men are often hailed as “heroes or game-changers.”“There is a real double standard that is really evident and sort of infuriating,” said Tessier. “It made me crazy how I was treated so badly just because I wanted to have a better workplace for myself.”last_img read more