Celtra Changes Price Structure to Its Self-Serve Platform for Rich Media Mobile Ads [Updated]

first_imgdan rowinski A new tool is coming for advertisers that want to create rich media ads for the mobile Web and native applications. Celtra, an ad creation platform out of Cambridge, Mass., is announcing new price structures through two new features to its platform to create animated banner ads and single page expandable ads that are aimed to increase mobile ad engagement. The notion is to lower the barrier for entry for advertisers and publishers to create rich media ads for mobile. The philosophy behind mobile ads is changing. The idea is to move away from drop down and static banner ads and create more rich media and interstitial ads that users are more likely to find enticing and harder to avoid. Celtra wants to lead the third-party charge in creating those kinds of ads, but it is swimming in deep waters. There are a variety of companies that are aiming at the same goal. Celtra is hoping that with its new pricing structure it can be the leader in bringing these solutions to the masses. Celtra is a self-service ad creation platform for iOS, Android and the mobile Web. It partners with the who’s who of mobile ad creation and distribution, from Google’s DoubleClick and AdMob to Jumptap and real-time bidding network Nexage (also a Boston-based company). It has created ads for Intel, Bing and Capital One (pictured). Celtra can provide the tools to create rich media ads as well as analytics for the performance of those ads.Celtra’s solutions are near the top of the industry. The new pricing of the platform is designed to bring rich media ads from big brand agencies to the masses. Essentially, Celtra’s offerings will come in different pricing tiers with more tools and functionality the more you pay. The two new announcements are the animated HTML5 banner ads and the simple rich media ads that can fit a variety of price structures. Yet, the company could be in for possible disruption. It will not come from below with a startup looking to eats its lunch, but rather from above. Apple iAd is eventually aiming to do exactly what Celtra is releasing tomorrow – an easy-to-use platform designed for creating rich media ads in iOS and the mobile Web. The difference between iAd and Celtra is the fact that Apple holds a tight rein on the iAd platform. When it initially launched, advertisers needed to pony up at least $1 million and then be subject to Apple’s creative team. The payoff for the investment was supposed to be lucrative but Apple may have overplayed its hand as iAd has not been much heard of since launching in the spring of 2010. If Apple takes its grip off of iAd (which is entirely possible with the passing of Steve Jobs and his manner of control of the user interface) and creates a self-serve platform much in the same manner, Celtra will find itself competing directly against one of the largest corporations in the world. Developers and advertisers – Does Celtra’s new tool look like an answer to increasing engagement in mobile ads? Can it help developers get paid? Let us know in the comments. Update Oct. 17, 5:11 p.m. EST — Due to miscommunication, this post and headline has been updated to clarify the nature of the new Celtra offerings. It is not creating a new platform. Celtra is adding two new features to platform to diversify the pricing structure. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#mobile#Mobile Ads Related Posts center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Cartoon: A Thicker Skin

first_imgrob cottingham 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts So it’s happened again: a company comes under fire for some misdeed — perceived or actual — and gets a few critical comments on their Facebook Page. And their crisis communications strategy is to pour gasoline on that little flame by deleting those comments.The latest folks to do this are the people at ChapStick, who ran a print ad that offended a few folks. Those critics posted their complaints on ChapStick’s Facebook page (most of them quite civil). ChapStick’s page administrators then deleted the comments; this case adds an ironic new wrinkle because of the ad copy pointing people to their Facebook presence, which reads “Be heard.”After enduring a torrent of criticism for deleting the criticism, ChapStick posted an apology for the ad and a sort-of explanation for deleting the comments, saying they follow Facebook guidelines and “remove posts that use foul language, have repetitive messaging, those that are considered spam-like (multiple posts from a person within a short period of time) and are menacing to fans and employees.” Which, with most of the comments, wasn’t the case.It seems to bear repeating: brands, learn to take some criticism on your social web presences. Why? Because…Accusations of suppressing those comments are often more damaging than the original criticisms themselves.The presence of critical comments gives the conversation happening on your Facebook Page, blog or other presence a sense of authenticity. That means the positive user comments carry more weight than they would if your site had nothing but obsequious flattery.A critical comment can be an opportunity for engagement on your part. It’s your chance to answer a criticism, resolve a complaint, correct some misinformation. And you may be catching a little issue before it becomes a much bigger one.A critical comment can be an spur to participation and conversation by your community. Let’s face it; for most brands and organizations, excess participation usually isn’t the problem with their Facebook pages.So maybe it’s time to learn to love the negative. A thicker skin not only saves you from the sting of a little criticism; it can let you realize from genuine benefit… and keep you from becoming the latest high-profile case study in why comment deletion can backfire.See more of Rob’s Noise to Signal cartoons herecenter_img Tags:#Cartoons#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

Scaling Business Intelligence with Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series (code-named “Westmere”)

first_imgBy how much a drop-in CPU upgrade can boost your server app performance? By 1.2x,… 1.4x? Please find below a report how even astonishing 1.64x can be possible.Recently, Intel has launched the Xeon® Processor 5600 Series (formerly known as “Westmere”). The new CPU is an upgrade for the 5500 Series with two remarkable improvements:• 50% more cores in a single CPU: six instead of four• Higher frequency: 3.33 GHz instead of 2.93 GHzThese and many other enhancements (like larger last level cache and fast encryption/decryption instructions) boosted many well known benchmarks.There is an exceptional result I am especially proud of: Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series provided up to 1.64x performance gain for the SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer, accelerated version (including SAP NetWeaver BW Accelerator). This software combines intuitive information search and exploration functionality with the high performance and scalability of in-memory analytics. If you want to feel this intuitiveness and breathtaking speed even on tremendous data volumes, please visit http://microfinance.sap.com/, it takes only a minute to register.SAP and Intel have collaborated for years to deliver SAP NetWeaver BW Accelerator (backend for the accelerated version of SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer) as an extraordinary business intelligence appliance, optimizing and tuning it to utilize the advantages of Intel architecture. As a result, our customers will benefit from almost perfect scaling with the new CPU upgrade. Theoretically, the improvement one could hope for is about (6/4)x(3.33/2.93)=1.70x (through the increased core count and increased frequency). That means an amazing scaling efficiency of 96% is achieved!For more details please see the attached solution brief “SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer, Accelerated Version, and SAP NetWeaver* Business Warehouse Accelerator on the Intel ® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series”. If you have questions, let me know (send me a private message or post a comment here), I will be happy to answer.Enjoy your new Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series!last_img read more

Move Beyond Gender Stereotypes

first_imgChanging the StereotypeI believe tech industry stereotypes are changing fast. And not because of the intervention of some external mandate or investment, but by the fast evolving nature of technology itself.Advances in the fields of big data processing, the Internet of Things, and data analytics are fundamentally transforming how and to what end technology is used. With an increasing emphasis on analytics, interpretation of trends and patterns in data, and integration of data insights into other fields, the kinds of skills needed to succeed in these new technical fields are evolving fast.I belong to a small professional group called the Women in Big Data Forum. One of our goals is to encourage and attract more female talent to the big data and analytics fields and help enhance diversity in these industries. However, our group is not limited to women solely in high tech—because the value of big data insights is not limited to technologists. Big data analysis is valuable to anyone with business acumen and the intuition to see trends, connections and relationships in data.And in many ways, women are better at that than men.In analytical fields, technical prowess is necessary, but only part of what’s needed to succeed. Women in Data Science: 4 Perspectives is a fascinating series of interviews with four data scientists commenting on current opportunities for women in big data analytics. In the article, the commentators stress, “the fields of data science and analytics are absolutely exploding with opportunity” for men and women alike, though women are finding a great deal of success in these fields because “they often bring a different intuition to the table.”This in part results from the fact that data analysis is an interdisciplinary field. According to Sarah Aerni, principal data scientist at Pivotal, “This field [data analytics] benefits from diversity in thinking. There is rarely only one way to approach a problem, and new ideas and input can only lead to more variety in approaches and potentially better outcomes.” In addition, the consumers of data science exist in every industry, and require people in data analytics to interact with a wide variety of businesses and individuals. “It is a field that values a variety of skills, deep technical abilities, hacking, storytelling, visualization and constant learning,” says Aerni. “This is something I value, and I think it encourages diverse backgrounds as well.”Diversity is Good BusinessDiversity in a technical workplace does come with benefits. The vast majority of innovations are developed not by lone geniuses but in a team environment, where groups of people work together to solve problems together. Within these teams, diversity of views, experience and expertise is a key to success because it broadens the pool of knowledge from which innovation springs.This is great news for both women and men, and for people with a variety of backgrounds and experience. As promising as the new top-down diversity programs and STEM initiatives are, there’s no reason to wait. Set aside the stereotypes and look for the opportunities that are opening right now.I encourage my colleagues in the tech sector to use their voices, their influence and their passion for innovation to look for opportunities to move beyond gender stereotypes and allow each individual to shine at whatever he or she is good at. After all, a more diverse and inclusive work force is a driver for innovation, as a broad set of experiences, perspectives, and backgrounds are crucial for the development of new ideas and creativity. Increasing the diversity of workers in the technology industry has become the issue of the moment. A steady stream of tech companies, from start-ups to giant corporations, are pledging to hire more women and minorities workers. By doing so, they may begin to eliminate some of the stereotypes that present barriers to entry to male-dominated fields like technology.These programs have taken on different forms, including:Apple’s $50 million donation to organizations that help women and minorities get into tech jobs;Intel’s $300 million initiative to increase the diversity of its workforce;Salesforce’s directive that all important meetings must include at least 30 percent women.These are laudable efforts, and in conjunction with improved STEM education and coding schools to help improve the skills of women and other under-represented groups, we can hope soon to see a tech workforce that looks more like the general population.Yet, I wonder if new advances and opportunities in technology haven’t already turned the old stereotypes on their ear, and brightened the prospects for women and minority workers at the cutting edge of the industry?last_img read more

Cristiano Ronaldo brace gives Real Madrid 2-1 win over Eibar

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo continued with his rich form as he once again netted a brace to give Real Madrid a 2-1 win at Eibar in La Liga on Saturday.Ronaldo scored for the seventh successive game in all competitions by blasting into the net in the 34th minute after chesting down a long ball by Luka Modric, but eighth-placed Eibar pegged the champions back when Ivan Ramis outjumped Sergio Ramos to head home from a corner in the 50th.Ronaldo was denied by an inspired save by Eibar’s Marko Dmitrovic, who clawed away the Portuguese’s header following a cross from Gareth Bale.The irrepressible striker had the final say, however, meeting a cross from Dani Carvajal in the area and powering the ball beyond the Serbian goalkeeper in the 84th minute, scoring a 13th goal in his last seven games in all competitions.Real are third in the Liga standings on 57 points, 12 behind runaway leaders Barcelona, who visit basement club Malaga later on Sunday. Atletico host Celta Vigo on Sunday.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more