Liberty Tree Tavern: An All-American Favorite

first_imgShare This!Table service restaurants in Magic Kingdom can be wildly inconsistent in terms of quality–many people describe the “not quite as good as Olive Garden” standard of Tony’s Town Square, but many people delight in the food at Be Our Guest (while choking down the price tag). Although Crystal Palace is an all-you-can-eat buffet, you do pay a premium for the character part of the meal. Factoring in a desire for good food, good quality, and a reasonable price point (especially for all you can eat), it is easy to see why Liberty Tree Tavern is a family favorite. (And that’s without mentioning ooey gooey toffee cake!)Liberty Tree Tavern is located, no surprise, in Liberty Square. To keep with the theme of the area and the restaurant, it is located in what looks like a colonial-style tavern. Reservations are recommended–even on the relatively quiet weekday that we visited, they were turning people away before noon due to no availability. Once you get inside, there is a small waiting area with seating, and a kids’ table off to the side with an oversized game of checkers and some coloring sheets. One neat aspect of the restaurant is that they ask you where you are from, and call out your name with the colony (if you’re part of the original 13) or territory/country (for everyone else) when it is time to be seated. At that point, they encourage everyone to applaud. I’ve been in there when the place is packed, and it can be a lot of fun. When it’s mostly empty, it feels a little awkward. (Self-conscious introverts, unite in your own personal bubbles of safety.)Another aspect to note is that the dining rooms are in elevated areas from the entrance, so there are stairs to climb to get to your table. For those who need assistance, a small wheelchair lift is available.Each of the dining rooms has a colonial persona theme. For our visit, we were seated in the Ben Franklin room, complete with portrait, fire department helmet, and printing press.For lunch, Liberty Tree Tavern offers two sections to the menu. The first is the a la carte section, which has a modest assortment of foods. Truth told, I’d skip most of these entrees–you’re better served by getting the pot roast as part of the platter (more on that in a moment), and for the fish and chips, just go across the way to Columbia Harbour House to save some money. The only two items that might be of appeal, especially if you’re trying to go vegetarian, are the Colony Salad (which I’ve had and do enjoy for a lighter meal) and the Freedom Pasta (which can be made as a vegetarian dish).Realistically, the best option on the menu, and what people really go to this place for, is the all-you-can-eat family-style platter. This is a general crowd pleaser for your meat and potatoes crew, and for people who want something akin to a home-cooked meal while they are on vacation. My daughter was considering ordering either the turkey or the mac ‘n’ cheese from the kids’ menu, but for a bit more, she got both of those, plus salad and dessert. When the serving was brought out, it looked like enough for two adults, so if you’ve got a big eater in the kids’ price range, this can be a very cost-effective meal.The meal is brought out in three courses. The first course is the house salad, which contains a lettuce mix, onions tomatoes, and cucumbers. Because my daughter doesn’t like sauces, I asked for the dressing on the side, and I was very glad that I did. The house dressing is a “colonial dressing”, which ends up being painfully sweet and slightly tangy. I enjoyed putting a small amount of dressing on my salad, but anything more than a drizzle would have been too sweet for my tastes. The salad itself was crisp and fresh, and a great way to start the meal.Also brought out with the meal were rolls with butter. Yes, I know this is a way to get you to fill up with bread so you don’t eat more of the higher-cost items in the platter, but the rolls were very good.The next course that was brought out was the platter itself, with a plate of meats and several bowls of side dishes. On the main platter (clockwise from upper left) was sliced turkey, cranberry-orange sauce, roast pork, and pot roast, with dressing in the center. By far, our favorite was the turkey, which was moist and flavorful. The pot roast was also very tender, but didn’t have the “pot roast flavor” (the taste of roasted vegetables) unless you scooped some of the sauce from underneath. The roast pork was quite tasty, but was impossible to pry apart with the provided tongs. I finally was able to break it apart and get some onto my plate, but it was a challenge. The cranberry-orange sauce wasn’t my favorite–I prefer the tart taste of regular ol’ cranberries. Between that and the salad dressing, I have to think they were trying to numb my tastebuds to sugar so I could survive dessert. And, there was dressing. If you like Stove Top Stuffing, this is your thing. If you’re looking for something better, just skip it.Also brought onto the table was mac ‘n’ cheese and mashed potatoes with gravy (on the side). At one time Liberty Tree Tavern was sponsored by Stouffer’s, and I’m wondering if they have dropped the sponsorship. The mac ‘n’ cheese was certainly my idea of house-made (as advertised), because in my house we often make the box of Kraft Deluxe Mac ‘n’ Cheese, which is what this tasted like. If you’re looking for lots of cheese to dip that bread into, you won’t find it here. But it’s not bad mac ‘n’ cheese–and it works for the comfort food vibe. But if you’re watching your carbs (and I can’t believe I’m saying this), skip the mac ‘n’ cheese and pile on the mashed potatoes. I’ve severely cut back my potato consumption this year, and so I planned to only try a forkful of the mashed potatoes. That was the plan–until I tried them. No instant potatoes here, and the flavor and texture was just right. Even though there’s bits of potato skin in it, which made my daughter want to skip it altogether, she gave the flavor her seal of approval. With the turkey gravy on top–delish! Call me shocked that the turkey and potatoes, items that more often than not are the blandest foods around, were the highlight of the meal.The seasonal vegetables were fresh green beans. Overall, they were okay (fresh instead of frozen and cooked al dente), but Disney food execs…can I talk to you for just a moment? Please stop putting black pepper on all of your vegetables. If people want pepper on their vegetables, that’s why there’s a pepper shaker next to the salt shaker on the table (or, for added service, have your servers come out and offer fresh-cracked pepper tableside). It didn’t improve the flavor of the green beans, and the little flecks all over the beans meant that several kids in the dining room wouldn’t try them. Thanks!There is no doubt that this restaurant saves the best for last. The Ooey Gooey Toffee Cake may be one of the finest desserts in Magic Kingdom. (Take that, Grey Stuff!) First, the presentation is adorable–it comes in a small frying pan serving dish. The dish itself is not heated, however, making it safe to put on the table near kids and adults who will be reaching for it right away and making the ice cream melt slower. At the bottom of the “cake” is basically something akin to a thick slice of toffee-chip cookie. Then you smother that in an unholy amount of vanilla ice cream, chocolate, caramel, and a hearty dose of Heath bar-like topping. It’s sticky, it’s rich, and it is the epitome of comfort food dessert. This dessert doesn’t disappoint. I’ve known people to get a reservation late in the evening just to order it. Yes, it’s that good.Overall, Liberty Tree Tavern provides a solid meal at a reasonable price for all-you-can eat. There’s more hits than misses on the platter of foods, and there is something for just about everyone. Discounts (DVC, AP, Tables in Wonderland) are available, and reservations are recommended.Have you eaten at Liberty Tree Tavern? Do you dream of Ooey Gooey Toffee Cake? Let us know your views in the comments.last_img read more

10 Lessons I Learned About Reputation Management at Digital Summit Detroit

first_imgTrain your staff on how to respond to your customers.Invest in your social customer care team. Hire credible people and provide guidelines. Share reputation goals for your organization with your employees.Companies should share reputation goals with employees to turn them into ambassadors @andybeal #DSDET15— Amy Messano (@AmyMessano) September 23, 2015 Just because you can brag about it, doesn’t mean you should. In 2013, Emma Way tweeted about hitting a bicylist with her automobile and knocking him off his bike. The local police discovered the tweet; a few months later Way was found guilty on two counts related to the incident. Just because you can brag about it doesn’t mean you should @AndyBeal #DSDET15 pic.twitter.com/5faTkUnnKo— Ryan Jones (@RyanJones) September 23, 2015 Your behavior reflects on your business. Be on your best behavior.If someone asked if you knew who Walter Palmer was, would you know? How about if someone asked if you knew about the dentist who killed Cecil the lion in Africa in 2015? That was Palmer. News of Palmer killing the prized lion in Zimbabwe went worldwide, with people using the hashtag #WalterPalmer to share their anger. His personal big-game killing behavior negatively affected his dental business, which closed for several weeks. Palmer returned to work at his dental practice earlier this month.Your reputation is always being judged…your company and personal reputation aren’t two separate things anymore #DSDET15— Franco (@FrancoPRGroup) September 23, 2015 Use the right account.When an unusual tweet was posted to the American Red Cross account, the organization acted quickly to resolve the issue. The backstory: Gloria Huang planned to post the tweet to her personal account, but due to her inexperience with Hootsuite, the tweet was posted to the organization account. The American Red Cross averted a crisis with a light-hearted tweet, Huang apologized from her personal Twitter account, and the Red Cross converted the incident into a donation opportunity. Know your audience. Understand how your customer base will respond locally as well as globally.Go where your customers go. While you may have decided to focus on two or three channels, monitor other channels. If a customer complains on a channel you don’t use, you want to respond. Rep Roadkill: Go where your audience is. Address complaints on that forum – do not ignore! @AndyBeal #DSDET15— Lori (@1224Lori) September 23, 2015Tip: Take the conversation offline. Set up a unique email address for the channel (twitter_service@yourcompany.com) for handling communication. Be careful with any automation you use.Be aware of every item that is scheduled (where an editorial calendar comes in handy). Be restrictive. Just because something is popular, don’t jump on it.Notice a popular hashtag on Twitter and want to share something about it on your social media channel? Does it fit into your strategy? Think twice before acting. Big lies will eventually be revealed. Be truthful, don’t embellish things.For years, NBC News anchor Brian Williams told a story about being in a helicopter in Iraq that was hit by a grenade.Not exactly the whole truth. Turns out, Williams was in a helicopter in Iraq, but not in one that was hit by a grenade.Williams was put on a six-month leave early this year. He returned to the MSNBC network earlier this month to cover Pope Francis’s visit to the United States.Rep Roadkill: Don’t rewrite history to put yourself somewhere you weren’t. Big lies are eventually revealed. @AndyBeal #DSDET15— Lori (@1224Lori) September 23, 2015 This week, I joined hundreds of digital professionals, content strategists, social media experts, user experience practitioners, and email marketers at the two-day Digital Summit Detroit conference. One of my favorite talks was Andy Beal’s lunchtime keynote on reputation management. As a reputation management expert, he’s seen his share of good and bad examples of companies managing their reputation. Beal, chief executive officer of Trackr and author of Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation, shared his insights and highlighted examples of social media gone wrong.In addition, Beal shared examples of companies doing a good job managing their reputation and offered tips for dealing with a crisis situation.I heard stories about a rogue tweet, poorly timed social media updates, and organizations taking a bad situation and turning it around into something amazing. Here’s what I learned:There’s no difference between your personal reputation and business reputation.Despite all the Twitter bios with “tweets are my own and don’t represent my company”, you only have one online reputation. You only have one reputation, says @andybeal. There’s no difference between personal and business reputation. #DSDET15— Deborah Edwards-Onoro (@redcrew) September 23, 2015center_img We Have a Crisis, Now What?It’s going to happen. A tweet or story on one of your social media channels that’s poorly timed, incorrectly posted, or doesn’t include the right information. What do you do during a crisis? Beal recommends:Be sincereBe transparentBe consistentApologize and explain what caused it to happen. Demonstrate you put changes in place so it doesn’t happen again. Q: What advice would you give #VW? #dieselgate A: Own it. Admit it. Be Sincere. Be transparent. Be consistent w follow up @AndyBeal #DSDET15— Lori (@1224Lori) September 23, 2015 If having a reputation crisis you need to be sincere, transparent and consistent in your messaging – @AndyBeal #DSDET15— Mike McClure (@mikekmcclure) September 23, 2015 Win back customers by accepting your fault!!! They will tell 20 others @AndyBeal #DSDET15— Jas Sidhu (@jas_AppD) September 23, 2015Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedTakeaways from WordCamp Detroit 2018Last weekend I had the pleasure of joining over 120 WordPress users—bloggers, writers, designers, business owners, digital marketers, developers, and user experience specialists—at the WordCamp Detroit 2018 conference to learn and talk about WordPress. It was wonderful to attend a conference where I didn’t have to travel, other than to…In “Conference”September 2013 User Experience and Web Professionals EventsAlong with friends and colleagues, my friend Nick DeNardis has been after me for years to create a calendar of local events. Given my interests, I hear about and attend several UX, web design and development, social media and entrepreneur events each week. Which I tell Nick about after the…In “Calendar”September 2014 User Experience and Web Professional EventsIf you’re a web professional, you know it’s a challenge to keep your skills up to date, learn about new methods, and network with colleagues. It takes time to find interesting local events. And if you’re new to the area, where do you start? I’ve taken some of the work…In “Calendar”last_img read more

Climate-change contrarian loses Australian funding

first_imgOnce the darling of Australia’s conservative government, controversial climate contrarian Bjørn Lomborg has lost his Down Under caché—and cash. Yesterday, education minister Simon Birmingham, told a Senate committee that the government had withdrawn its offer of $3 million toward establishing an Australian version of Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus Center.The government of former Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who in 2009 dismissed climate change as “absolute crap,” had been keen to support an Australian Consensus Centre (ACC) that would conduct policy research on overseas aid, Australian prosperity, agriculture, and regional issues. Malcolm Turnbull replaced Abbott as leader of the Liberal Party on 15 September. Long in favor of action on climate change, Turnbull is gradually shifting the government’s course. Birmingham, appointed 19 September, told the committee that his predecessor, Christopher Pyne, had decided before the reshuffle that the “proposal was unlikely to enjoy success and that the funds could be better utilized elsewhere.” A spokesman for Lomborg told The Australian newspaper that it was “disappointing that a significant global research effort attracting top economists to look at development priorities will no longer be associated with Australia.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The ACC proposal had a bumpy ride from the beginning. The University of Western Australia (UWA) in Perth announced plans to host it last April. The revelation that the government would contribute funding to start the center and cover a third of its operating expenses triggered outrage from the scientific and academic communities. In the wake of the uproar, UWA Vice Chancellor Paul Johnson announced on 8 May with “great regret and disappointment” that he would cancel the center’s contract and return the money to the government. The Abbott government vowed to find another host institution; Flinders University, in Adelaide, was developing a proposal with Lomborg. The news about the loss of funding was “disappointing” to Colin Stirling, Flinders’ vice-chancellor said in a statement. “Universities should be places for contesting controversial issues without fear or favour,” he said.Although government money is off the table, Birmingham noted that if any university wished to work with Lomborg, “they should of course feel absolutely free to do so.”last_img read more

NIH to double funding for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patient distrust remains

first_img A September protest called Millions Missing displayed shoes belonging to people with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. This pair was among scores that lined the sidewalk in front of the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Ever since it was given a name, many researchers and physicians have viewed the malady, which has no Food and Drug Administration–approved treatment and no diagnostic test, as psychosomatic. Then, in 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) dismissed the “misconception” of the disease as psychological in a report informed by a review of more than 9000 articles from 64 years of medical literature. “Remarkably little research funding has been made available to study the etiology, pathophysiology, and effective treatment of this disease, especially given the number of people affected,” the authors noted. CDC estimates that ME/CFS affects more than 1 million Americans, a majority of them women.The IOM report “had an unbelievable effect,” because it validated patients’ experiences—”it told them that they weren’t crazy,” says geneticist Ronald Davis, who directs the Genome Technology Center at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and was one of the report’s 15 authors. Davis became a passionate advocate for ME/CFS research and shifted his own studies to the topic after his now 33-year-old son fell ill with ME/CFS in 2008; he is now bedridden. “It also did a lot to NIH and the CDC, who had been ignoring this disease.”Not long after the IOM report was published, NIH issued its own written assessment, concluding that research has neglected many of the biological factors behind ME/CFS and urging more basic science aimed at teasing out the mechanisms of the disease. Collins also announced a “strengthening” of the agency’s ME/CFS effort. He moved oversight of the research out of the agency’s small Office of Research on Women’s Health and into the $1.7 billion National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and launched an intramural study that began enrolling people late last month. Forty patients who have developed the disease within the last 5 years, after an infection, will be run through a battery of exams at the Clinical Center, the NIH’s research hospital. The assessments, from exercise stress tests to brain magnetic resonance imaging tests, will probe the biological and clinical characteristics of the disease—for which there is not even a broadly agreed-upon definition. For comparison, the study will also include healthy controls and people who have recovered from Lyme disease, which can cause similar symptoms.The disease remains a beggar when it comes to budget.Deborah Waroff, retired Wall Street energy analystSome ME/CFS patients remain skeptical that the NIH moves reflect a genuine commitment to research on the disease. They have criticized what they call the narrow eligibility criteria being used for the Clinical Center study, and they complain that even $15 million scarcely begins to fund the research they say is needed. Critics such as Deborah Waroff, a retired Wall Street energy analyst who fell ill with ME/CFS in 1989, point, for instance, to multiple sclerosis, a similarly chronic, debilitating disease, which affects fewer than half as many Americans, according to one recent estimate. It received about 13 times as much NIH funding in 2016: $98 million. “ME still floats in space, belonging fully to no NIH institute and therefore having de jure claim to no budget,” Waroff says. “The disease remains a beggar when it comes to budget.”Any goodwill won by Whittemore’s appearance in Florida may have evaporated after anger erupted last week when ME/CFS patients learned NIH had invited Edward Shorter, a medical historian at the University of Toronto in Canada, to give a 9 November talk at the agency. Shorter last year called the IOM report affirming the biological basis of ME/CFS “valueless; junk science at its worst.” He traces the disease to a 1970s “brew of toxic beliefs about being tired all the time.”Walter Koroshetz, the director of NINDS, defended the talk, writing in a letter to ME/CFS patients that “inclusion in the scientific conversation is not an endorsement.” In an email to Science, he wrote that Shorter’s talk was not “an official ME/CFS lecture. [An] announcement went out to the contrary. That was recalled. End of story.”Tangible scientific progress on unraveling ME/CFS might be the best medicine to heal the current divisions. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in August found depressed blood levels of scores of metabolites in people with the disease compared with healthy controls, suggesting that the disease may push the body into a low-energy state some have compared with hibernation. Scientists and patients are eagerly waiting for the results of a similar study by Lipkin’s team. If replicated, the tantalizing finding could fit with an emerging theory that subpar function by mitochondria, the organelles that provide energy for cells, drives the disease.Hints that the monoclonal antibody rituximab, a drug that destroys antibody-producing B cells, may help some people with ME/CFS have also sparked optimism. ME/CFS patients have a slightly elevated risk of developing B-cell lymphoma, and Norwegian researchers accidentally found that treating a woman who had both conditions with rituximab markedly improved her ME/CFS symptoms. The group went on to do a nonblinded study of the antibody in 29 ME/CFS patients, 18 of whom reported major or moderate improvements in their symptoms. The researchers are now running a larger, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of the drug in 152 patients, planning to evaluate its effectiveness next October.Øystein Fluge, one of the Norwegian trial’s leaders and an oncologist at the University of Bergen’s Haukeland University Hospital in Norway, remains cautious. “Many places on the internet say this is an autoimmune disease. We haven’t said that. We think some features fit, probably, with some autoimmune mechanism. But that’s a hypothesis. We aren’t sure.” Only one thing is sure: After decades of frustration, the mysterious disease remains maddeningly elusive. The most anticipated speaker late last month at an international conference devoted to the mysterious malady commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was not a scientist with a hot new finding—although there was excitement about new research in the air. Rather, it was a National Institutes of Health (NIH) official bearing good news to a community that has long existed on the margins of the biomedical research establishment. Vicky Whittemore, the agency’s CFS point person in Bethesda, Maryland, delivered on a promise that NIH Director Francis Collins made last year by announcing that NIH spending for research on the poorly understood disease should rise to roughly $15 million in 2017, doubling the estimated $7.6 million handed out in 2016.What’s more, the NIH emissary said to those gathered here, the biomedical agency will in December solicit CFS proposals from outside scientists to establish several collaborative centers for basic and clinical research, and another center to manage their data on the illness. The calls for applications, which will come with dedicated funds from the planned budget increase, are the first of their kind for CFS from the United States’s major medical research funder since 2005. “There is a shifting tide at NIH with regard to ME/CFS,” Whittemore told the conference, incorporating the term that many with the multisystem illness prefer. (ME stands for “myalgic encephalomyelitis,” and the meeting was convened by the International Association for CFS/ME.)center_img Some scientists working on the disease agree. “The fact that there is a budget for it at all means that the agency is taking it seriously. And it’s not coming only out of Francis Collins’s discretionary fund, but from the individual NIH institutes,” says Ian Lipkin, an immunologist at Columbia University, who serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director, Collins’s key group of external advisers. Lipkin is also a principal investigator, with Columbia psychiatrist Mady Hornig, on a $766,000 grant from NIH’s infectious diseases institute to collect samples from hundreds of patients and controls, looking for biomarkers that could be used to diagnose the disease and searching for clues to its causes.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)It has been nearly 3 decades since a group of researchers led by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) coined the term “chronic fatigue syndrome” after an investigation of two outbreaks in the United States. Typified by exhaustion that commonly worsens with physical, mental, or emotional exertion, the condition is also often characterized by short-term memory and concentration problems and profound fatigue that sleep does not relieve. Sufferers may experience widespread muscle and joint pain, immune system problems, headaches, and many other symptoms. The onset of the disease frequently follows an infectious illness.last_img read more