One step closer to digital broadcasting

first_imgThe migration from analogue to digital signal was first agreed to at the International Telecommunication Union, a United Nations agency for telecommunication. Global shift to digital As part of the scheme, the government plans to subsidise 70%, or around R400, of the expected R700 cost of a set-top box. The council comprises Mamokgethi Setati (chairperson), Ruddy Rashama (deputy chairperson), Nomvuyiso Batyi, Dingane Dube, Calvo Mawela, Karen Willenberg, Zubair Munshi, Sabelo Silinga, Richard Paulton, Cawekazi Mahlati, Llewellyn Jones, Julia Hope, Masodi Xaba, Hlukanisa Zitha and Rosey Sekese. In August 2008, then Communications Minister Ivy Matsepe-Casaburri announced that the government would introduce a scheme for ownership support to help households that could not afford to buy set-top boxes. Communications Minister Siphiwe Nyanda this week named the 15 members of the Digital Dzonga Advisory Council, which will advise on and oversee the broadcasting migration process. According to the Department of Communications, the 15 members were drawn from 51 nominations submitted by the public. The council to oversee South Africa’s migration from analogue to digital broadcasting has been appointed. The country’s analogue signal will be switched off on 1 November 2011, after which South Africans will require either digital-compliant TV sets or converters for their existing sets in order to watch television. After 1 November 2011, the analogue signal will be switched off, and viewers will need a set-top box to convert the digital signal for their analogue television sets. However, digital-compliant television sets, which do not require set-top boxes, will also be available by then.center_img The current period of “dual-illumination”, in which television will be broadcast via both analogue and digital signals, runs until 1 November 2011. The members represent a wide variety of backgrounds, ranging from regulatory, signal distribution, legal, broadcasting, labour, consumer groups and the government. Subsidies for poorer households 25 August 2010 The union took a decision that protection for analogue signals would cease in 2015. Member states were given timelines per region to comply with the decision. Africa forms part of region 1, together with Europe and the Middle East. Matsepe-Casaburri said the advantages of digital broadcasting far outweighed the estimated cost of such a subsidy. These include access to more channels, including focused educational channels, and direct access to new services, such as e-government services. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Ivy League school joins UCT to fight HIV

first_img6 November 2013 The University of Cape Town has teamed up with US Ivy League school Brown University to develop a new cadre of HIV social scientists who can provide sustainable, interdisciplinary solutions to HIV/Aids in South Africa, where one in six adults has HIV. Around 6.2-million South Africans live with the disease – the world’s largest HIV-positive population. The project, named “Partnership for the Next Generation of HIV Social Science in South Africa”, will see the social sciences playing a greater role in the response to HIV. It will be run in UCT and Brown’s public health schools, and will be funded by the National Institute of Health at a cost of US$1.9-million over five years. The co-principal investigator from UCT is senior researcher Dr Christopher Colvin, an anthropologist in the Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research (CIDER) in the School of Public Health and Family Medicine. Colvin’s work integrates social science perspectives into public health research on HIV/Aids, gender, community health workers and health activism. “The social science and public health responses to HIV have both been tremendously important, and many at UCT are at the forefront of this research,” says Colvin. “However, these responses have often developed in parallel, rather than in close collaboration. This grant aims to integrate the social sciences into the core of our public health teaching and research on HIV in the school.” Brown’s participation will be led by South African-born Professor Mark Lurie, who has studied sub-Saharan Africa’s HIV epidemic for more than a decade.Opportunity “The new grant is a wonderful opportunity for Brown to contribute to training the next generation of South African social scientists, whose work is aimed at better understanding and preventing HIV infection in the country with the most severe epidemic,” says Lurie. The partnership will contribute to curricular development, training and professional development through collaborations with HIV-focused social and behavioural scientists at Brown. Outside of the classroom, it will also create opportunities for collaborative, interdisciplinary and innovative research in HIV social science, particularly at postgraduate and postdoctoral levels. Edited version of a story first published in UCT’s Monday Monthly. Published here with kind permission.last_img read more

NIH quietly shelves gun research program

first_img The funding stream “was mission critical to bringing me into a new area,” adds clinical psychologist Rinad Beidas of the University of Pennsylvania. Beidas won a grant to study how to implement gun safety counseling by pediatric primary care physicians to prevent youth suicide.A prominent gun rights advocacy group says the program is redundant, however, and charges that it is driven by an antigun animus. “Private groups and foundations donate millions of dollars to fund firearm research every year,” says Lars Dalseide, a spokesperson for the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action in Fairfax, Virginia. “When the government gets involved, and political agendas are allowed to supersede scientific analysis, the end product is nothing but a waste of tax-payer money.”Congress has long prohibited the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using government money “to advocate or promote gun control,” and in 2012 extended that restriction to other agencies in the Department of Health and Human Services. Obama argued, however, that research was not advocacy, and in response to his directive, NIH issued three funding opportunities for “Research on the Health Determinants and Consequences of Violence and its Prevention, Particularly Firearm Violence.” The application window would close in January 2017, the agency noted.A score of violence researchers and public health experts last November wrote to the agency’s lead official on the firearm research initiative, George Koob, director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, urging him to renew the program. “Think how many hundreds or thousands of [NIH] program announcements revolve around heart disease or cancer,” says Charles Branas of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, a longtime firearm researcher who signed the letter. “And they devoted one fleeting program announcement to this.”The $34 billion agency said last week that it is still evaluating the current program’s outcomes and has no timeline for a decision on its renewal.*Clarification: 21 November, 11:15 a.m.: This story has been changed to clarify that not all grants funded for $18 million under the research initiative specifically addressed firearm violence; some went to research on other kinds of violence. Specifically, 14 of the awards, accounting for $11.4 million of the $18 million, contain the words firearm, firearms, gun, guns, handgun, shootings or weapons in their title or abstract. AP Photo/Jessica Hill Parents leave a staging area after being reunited with their children following a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, where a gunman murdered 20 children and six educators on 14  December, 2012. Four years after then-President Barack Obama responded to the shooting deaths of 20 children and 6 adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, by ordering U.S. health agencies to sponsor gun research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has let lapse a funding program specifically calling for research on firearm violence and how to prevent it, Science has learned. Renewal of the program, which has funded 14-firearm related projects for $11.4 million over the past 3 years, “is still under consideration” a NIH spokesperson said on 6 September, although the agency stopped accepting proposals in January and the last new awards are now being launched.NIH told Science that scientists may still apply to do firearm research outside the program. Gun researchers say that’s not enough, noting that thematic funding programs signal NIH priorities to scientists. They can also help tilt grant decisions toward those in the highlighted area over others that are equally good, but outside it. “It’s really critically important to renew that program if we want more firearms research,” says Rina Das Eiden, a developmental psychologist at the State University of New York in Buffalo.Das Eiden and several collaborators won an award to study whether violence exposure and substance use raise the odds of gun violence in high-risk adolescents. “It would have been much harder for us to get funding for this research without that specific program announcement on firearm violence,” she says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img By Meredith WadmanSep. 13, 2017 , 12:13 PM NIH quietly shelves gun research programlast_img read more