Marshfield volleyball dominates Wisconsin Rapids

first_imgTigers improve to 5-3 in ValleyBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — With matches looming against the top two teams in the Wisconsin Valley Conference on Saturday, the Marshfield volleyball team wanted to make sure it took care of the business at hand Thursday.The Tigers started all three games strong and went on to beat Wisconsin Rapids 25-14, 25-11, 25-10 in a WVC match Oct. 6 at Marshfield High School.Marshfield is now 5-3 heading into the second conference tournament on Saturday at D.C. Everest. The Tigers will play first-place Everest and second-place Merrill as they look to make a push up the standings with only one week remaining in the regular season.Marshfield senior Stephanie Rhodes had eight kills in the victory, pushing her career total to 1,001, a milestone that coach Dawn Sadowska said was well-earned.“She’s been on varsity since she was a freshman, and year after year she’s been getting better,” Sadowska said. “We’ve asked more and more of her. She’s such a versatile hitter, and this year her blocking has been better than it ever has been for us.”Anna Ripp, who passed the 2,000-assist mark in her career last week, started the first game by serving six points in a row — three were aces — to push Marshfield out to a quick 7-1 lead.The Tigers finished just as strong, scoring the final eight points of the set, the final point coming on a Jamila Ougayour kill.Ripp had two aces to help Marshfield build a 5-0 lead to start Game 2 and served eight-straight points to begin the third set as the Tigers ran out to a 9-0 advantage. Marshfield was never challenged in either game.Ripp finished with 28 assists and six service aces, Alexa Aumann had a team-high 11 kills, and Maureen Cassidy had 15 digs to top Marshfield. The Tigers finished with 11 service aces overall.“Our plan was to serve aggressive, and we’ve been working on trying to run things faster,” Sadowska said. “I said every free ball, ‘We have to go quick because that’s our plan for this weekend,’ and they did a really good job of that.”(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)last_img read more

Graphene: Miracle Substance that is the Strongest, Lightest and Best Electrical Conductor Ever Known

first_imgGraphene has the potential to become a super material.  While it  doesn’t occur naturally, it has some interesting properties.  It is only a one-atom thick lattice of carbon, but it has incredible strength and electrical conductivity properties.    In fact, it is 200 times stronger than steel.  It is unsurpassed in thermal conductivity and elasticity.  It is also the lightest material ever measured.  While it is impenetrable, it is very pliable and transparent.Despite the unique set of properties, scientists have known about graphene for more than a decade but have had time trying to practically use it.  But that’s beginning to change.Scientists have found that graphene can be mixed to make a composite that when used as a photodetector can convert infrared light into electrical signals.  Graphene photodetectors have the potential to speed up computers and help reduce computer power consumption.  The material has the potential to convert light into electricity tens or hundreds of times faster than other known materials.  The material will allow faster transmission of data than fiber optic.Recent work at Columbia University and in South Korea discovered that graphene could be used to create one-atom big light bulbs.  James Hone, researcher at Columbia University, said that “the reason both [graphene and tungsten] are used is because they survive very, very high temperatures.  There are only a few metals that survive up to such high temperatures, and tungsten was one of them. However, carbon is another. Carbon was actually used in Edison’s first lightbulbs. And graphene is just a very pure crystalline form of carbon.”Researchers are investigating how graphene can be combined with fiber to create smart textiles.  Helena Alves, graphene researcher at the University of Aveiro, said that “the concept of wearable technology is emerging, but so far having fully textile-embedded transparent and flexible technology is currently non-existing. Therefore, the development of processes and engineering for the integration of graphene in textiles would give rise to a new universe of commercial applications. ”last_img read more

Climate-change contrarian loses Australian funding

first_imgOnce the darling of Australia’s conservative government, controversial climate contrarian Bjørn Lomborg has lost his Down Under caché—and cash. Yesterday, education minister Simon Birmingham, told a Senate committee that the government had withdrawn its offer of $3 million toward establishing an Australian version of Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus Center.The government of former Prime Minister Tony Abbott, who in 2009 dismissed climate change as “absolute crap,” had been keen to support an Australian Consensus Centre (ACC) that would conduct policy research on overseas aid, Australian prosperity, agriculture, and regional issues. Malcolm Turnbull replaced Abbott as leader of the Liberal Party on 15 September. Long in favor of action on climate change, Turnbull is gradually shifting the government’s course. Birmingham, appointed 19 September, told the committee that his predecessor, Christopher Pyne, had decided before the reshuffle that the “proposal was unlikely to enjoy success and that the funds could be better utilized elsewhere.” A spokesman for Lomborg told The Australian newspaper that it was “disappointing that a significant global research effort attracting top economists to look at development priorities will no longer be associated with Australia.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The ACC proposal had a bumpy ride from the beginning. The University of Western Australia (UWA) in Perth announced plans to host it last April. The revelation that the government would contribute funding to start the center and cover a third of its operating expenses triggered outrage from the scientific and academic communities. In the wake of the uproar, UWA Vice Chancellor Paul Johnson announced on 8 May with “great regret and disappointment” that he would cancel the center’s contract and return the money to the government. The Abbott government vowed to find another host institution; Flinders University, in Adelaide, was developing a proposal with Lomborg. The news about the loss of funding was “disappointing” to Colin Stirling, Flinders’ vice-chancellor said in a statement. “Universities should be places for contesting controversial issues without fear or favour,” he said.Although government money is off the table, Birmingham noted that if any university wished to work with Lomborg, “they should of course feel absolutely free to do so.”last_img read more