Fire, more than logging, drives Amazon forest degradation, study finds

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists have monitored deforestation for several decades using both on-the-ground and remote methods. Although clear-cut logging continues in earnest across the Amazon, deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon are lower than in the early 2000s. Degradation, on the other hand, remains a growing issue and historically has received less attention than forest loss.Measuring irregular losses in Amazon forest carbon stock is difficult. Selective logging targets valuable hardwood tree species such as ironwood and mahogany and typically removes several trees per hectare. Similarly, understory fires – caused by agricultural development, flammable debris leftover from logging, or careless disposal of cigarettes – may leave canopy foliage intact despite a charred underbelly. Modern-day satellite images cannot penetrate the forest canopy to record potential damage below, and isolated instances of degradation may not be visible at the 30-meter or higher resolution of standard satellite imagery. Surveillance by foot can more clearly identify degraded forests but is unfeasible for areas larger than a few hectares (or acres).In the last few decades, fortunately, a groundbreaking tool has managed to achieve both the fine resolution of ground inventory and the broad coverage of satellite data.LiDAR provides high-resolution, three-dimensional depictions of forestLight Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a method of remote sensing that uses light waves to measure distances to a target (in this case the Earth’s surface and vegetation) from a transmitter. Lasers are fired, typically from an airplane, at up to 150,000 pulses per second and bounce back to a highly acute sensor located near the source of the lasers. The distance to the target is calculated from how long it takes for the lasers to return, and different spectrums of light can be fired in order to survey different materials or structural properties. Combining the calculated distances travelled by individual lasers, each to a different point of the target, with a highly precise GPS system results in an impressively accurate three-dimensional representation of the target structure.An airborne LiDAR system includes a GPS to provide the plane’s position, an Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) to record the aircraft’s altitude, and a laser that scans back and forth across the terrain below. The laser sends many thousands of light pulses toward Earth that bounce back to the scanner. The return time of the pulses represents the distances from the known height of the plane to the surfaces below. The distance data are used to generate information about the shape and structure of the area’s vegetation. Image by University of Texas Coastal Studies Group.The incorporation of LiDAR data allowed the study’s researchers to explore dimensions of forest loss that previously were hard to quantify. “With LiDAR, we are able to characterize the fine-scale changes in carbon density associated with degradation,” Rappaport said. “[Carbon losses from degradation] have been trickier to characterize than carbon losses from deforestation, which are less subtle in nature.”The high-resolution data LiDAR produces enable scientists to assess the variability in canopy height, a metric of forest ecological stability. Rappaport and her co-authors determined that degradation due to fire and logging resulted in persistent changes in forest canopy structure, habitat that is critical to arboreal organisms such as saki monkeys in Peru.LiDAR data’s remarkable precision does come at a cost that is prohibitively high for most research teams. Since the technology was only recently developed, historic LiDAR data are not available, so change over a long time series cannot be observed.Historic satellite data, such as from the Landsat series, come in great use. The Landsat satellites have been operating continuously for 46 years, and the two currently orbiting satellites, 7 and 8, in combination record freely available images of almost the entire globe in an eight-day cycle. Although the images do not have the spatial resolution of LiDAR [each Landsat pixel is 30 meters (98 feet) across], Landsat complements LiDAR with resolution across time.Intact rainforest canopy in the Amazon Image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayLiDAR and satellite imagery can record forest structure across space and time, but determining a ratio of carbon per tree or hectare requires on-the-ground assessment of stored carbon. The researchers used tree species and size data from ground-based carbon inventories to estimate the amount of carbon the trees sequester. In combination, the three methods can be very powerful for measuring forest carbon stocks.“Our work to combine forest inventory measurements, airborne LiDAR, and Landsat time series serves as a blueprint for the synergistic use of multiple datasets to estimate carbon emissions from forest degradation,“ Rappaport said.Using this multifaceted approach, Rappaport and her colleagues estimated the loss of carbon due to forest degradation and the relative contributions by logging and fire. Their estimates of carbon loss due to fire were about three times higher than such estimates derived from field experiments or forest inventories in previous studies. Additionally, forests that experienced three or more recurrent fire events in 15 years or less were left with an average of 10 percent of the carbon stock found in the original forest stand.The researchers conclude that fire has the potential to release more carbon stocks than either selective logging or clear-cutting. And conditions may only get worse for the Amazon: projections of more frequent and intense droughts suggest hotter, bigger fires.Map of degraded and intact forest stands in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, where researchers from University of Maryland and NASA recorded forest degradation from fire and logging via ground-based, satellite and LiDAR data. Forest appears green, deforested areas appear pink, and circles indicate the center of forest stands with LiDAR coverage (see key for color code; U—undisturbed; L—logged; LB—logged and burned; B—burned). Figure from Rappaport et al. (2018). Quantifying long-term changes in carbon stocks and forest structure from Amazon forest degradation. Environmental Research Letters, 13.Accurate carbon estimates can revise outdated baselinesAlthough high-resolution data from sources such as LiDAR can reveal somber findings, acquiring an accurate depiction of the full amount of carbon lost due to both deforestation and degradation is critical to understanding – and preventing – anthropogenic disturbance of forests.Rappaport recommends that their findings be used to update guidelines for monitoring carbon stocks present within intact and degraded forests, a key requirement for countries seeking performance-based payments from reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) programs.“By combining the emissions factors published in this study with [forest cover change] data from satellite observations, we will be able to verify the long-term role that Amazon forest degradation plays within regional carbon cycling,” she said. Rappaport added that they could also “establish emissions baselines necessary for supporting the implementation of REDD+.”Additionally, because their high-resolution methods revealed that forest carbon stocks vary by about two orders of magnitude, the authors recommend multiple classes of degraded forest under the REDD+ framework.Such baselines and classifications are critical to determining the readiness of a nation to begin a REDD+ program and to monitoring the amount of carbon stock retained. The United Nations and World Bank fund two of the most prominent REDD+ programs, and partner countries, including every Amazonian nation but Brazil and Venezuela, must regularly monitor and report forest carbon stocks. If the monitoring process does not capture the full amount of carbon lost due to forest degradation, participating nations may be given more credit than is deserved.A refined understanding of the drivers of forest degradation can also refocus preventative efforts. The World Bank and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) quickly deployed fire control projects in the aftermath of the massive El Niño drought across the Amazon in 1998. With the provision of additional mapping of forest damage due to fires, and with organizations such as Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research taking note, widespread preventative initiatives could be revitalized.Although some international policy currently lags behind cutting-edge forest monitoring capabilities, it would not be the first time that remote sensing data has induced policy change.Looking over the Amazon forest canopy at dawn. Image by Brazilian things, CC 4.0“[Brazil]’s advanced satellite-based monitoring system was a central agent in spurring increased law enforcement and responsive action against forest clearing,” Rappaport said. More widespread LiDAR coverage throughout the Amazon is on the horizon, and continued surveillance will likely stir up more attention, and policy change, in response to forest degradation and the serious impact of anthropogenic fires. “Remote sensing is uniquely poised to help drive and enforce policy change to stem deforestation and degradation.”CitationRappaport, D, I., Morton, D. C., Longo, M., Keller, M., Nara dos-Santos, M. (2018). Quantifying long-term changes in carbon stocks and forest structure from Amazon forest degradation. Environmental Research Letters, 13.  https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aac331FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Amazon, Amazon Rainforest, Conservation Solutions, data, Forests, LiDAR, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Redd, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Sensors, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildtech center_img Although deforestation (left) is absolute and uniform, forest degradation (right) tends to be more irregular and patchy. Its effects on the forest interior are often undetectable from satellite imagery. Images by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.   Forest degradation has historically been overlooked in accounting and monitoring carbon stocks.A recent study combined ground-based inventory, satellite and LiDAR data to record the loss of carbon due to forest degradation in areas exposed to logging, fire damage, or both, in the arc of deforestation of the southeastern Amazon.The study revealed that fire damage causes greater losses than logging, and fire-damaged forests recovered more slowly than logged forests.Accurate depictions of both deforestation and degradation are necessary to establish emissions baselines used to inform programs to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). The shrieking rip of a chainsaw and the muffled roar of fire: both of these sounds are associated with extensive destruction of Amazon rainforest. But is logging or human-caused fire a larger issue for the fate of the Amazon? And when such activities culminate in a partially degraded forest – rather than complete deforestation – is there much cause for alarm?A recent study published in Environmental Research Letters explored these questions. Using a combination of ground-based, satellite and LiDAR data, scientists from the University of Maryland and NASA recorded the loss of carbon due to forest degradation in areas exposed to logging, fire damage, or both, in 20,000 square kilometers (7,722 square miles) of the southeast Amazon’s “arc of deforestation,” a crescent-shaped strip of intensive forest conversion along the southern and eastern edges of the forest.The Amazon arc of deforestation stretches across the southern and eastern edges of the forest and is rapidly expanding into the forest’s core. Data in Global Forest Watch from Hansen et al (2013) and Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research (INPE) PRODES project.The researchers found that degraded forest stands contained an average of 45.1 percent of the amount of carbon stored in intact forest stands. They compared the impacts of fire and logging, the two most prominent drivers of loss of forest carbon stocks. Fires not only resulted in higher loss of stored carbon than logging, but fire-damaged forests also recovered more slowly than logged forests. Forests subjected to fire remained more impacted after 15 years than forests subjected to logging after the same duration, and neither type of forest recovered to pre-disturbance carbon density.“We combined [forest inventory, satellite and LiDAR data] within a modeling framework to predict how losses and recovery rates of carbon stocks/forest structure are driven by differences in the type, intensity, and frequency of human degradation,“ said the study’s lead author Danielle Rappaport, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland. “By providing the first comprehensive set of emissions factors for Amazon forest degradation, this work aims to help support the formal integration of degradation within carbon accounting systems, which have generally excluded degradation all together.”Forest degradation discrete, dangerousDegradation, unlike deforestation, is not absolute. Instead of a complete elimination of forest from the land, degradation is a more subtle process through which patches of forest, or even just individual trees, are lost. But the loss is still significant: 50,815 square kilometers (19,620 square miles) of forest in the Brazilian Amazon was degraded between 2000 and 2010, and emissions from degradation in the Amazon may be higher than those from deforestation. Additionally, the decreased structural complexity of degraded forests cannot support as much biodiversity as primary, undamaged forest.last_img read more

Civil lawsuit begins over 2004 Pelee Island plane crash that killed 10

first_imgAlso killed were the pilot, Wayne Price of Richmond Hill, and his fiancee Jamie Levine of Los Angeles.An investigation by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada determined that the pilot Price was under stress and sleep-deprived when he decided to take off in a plane that was overloaded with a number of husky men, hunting dogs and luggage and “contaminated” with ice.The plane, 576 kilograms over the maximum allowable takeoff weight, took off at 4:40 p.m. for the short flight to Windsor Airport. It crashed into the ice of Lake Erie a few minutes later.In 2014, on the crash’s 10th anniversary, Ronald Spencler’s widow, Diane Spencler, spoke with Postmedia about the tragic crash and its aftermath.“Each year on the anniversary of that sad event, I silently acknowledge my husband Ron and the tremendous loss my son and I have suffered,” Spencler said.“I have moved forward with my life since that unfortunate time, but I haven’t forgotten the impact his passing had on us as a family.” The eight passengers killed, along with the pilot and his fiancee, in a January 2004 plane crash off Pelee Island. A jury in a civil trial is expected to start hearing evidence next week about a 2004 plane crash off Pelee Island that killed 10 people in one of the worst air disasters in Southwestern Ontario history.The family of Bob Brisco, one of the victims, filed the civil lawsuit against Georgian Express Ltd.There are also multiple individuals named as defendants in the lawsuit as well as the Owen Sound Transportation Company Ltd.A six-person jury, with two alternates, was selected Tuesday at the Chatham courthouse. Jurors are expected to begin hearing evidence Monday, with the trial expected to last 2 1/2 weeks.A court official declined Tuesday to provide Postmedia News with the statement of claim filed by Brisco’s family, saying its release could potentially bias jury members before evidence is presented in the civil trial. The same official also cited pre-trial motions presently being argued as another reason for not releasing the document.Brisco, 46, was with friends on a hunting trip with four other men from the Kingsville area when the Cessna Caravan crashed Jan. 17, 2004.Ronald Spencler, 53, and Walter Sadowski, 48, both of Windsor; Fred Freitas, 38, and Larry Janik, 48, of Kingsville; Brisco, 46, and brothers Ted Reeve, 53, and Tom Reeve, 49, of Chatham; and Dr. Jim Allen, 51, of Mitchell’s Bay were also aboard Georgian Express Flight 126.last_img read more

Spat over design of new Chinese telescope goes public

first_img Lu Feng By Yongming HuangAug. 11, 2017 , 12:13 PM China’s astronomers hope to leap from the 4-meter Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope to a new 12-meter telescope. Spat over design of new Chinese telescope goes public center_img A deep division among Chinese astronomers over the design of a proposed 12-meter telescope broke into public view this week as statements from competing camps went viral on social media.The dispute centers on whether to adopt a technically ambitious four-mirror design proposed by optical engineers or a conventional three-mirror option favored by astronomers. The stakes are high. It will be China’s largest optical telescope and serve as the workhorse observational facility for several generations.In a 4 August letter to the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Jiansheng Chen, an astronomer at Peking University in Beijing, notes that currently the largest Chinese-built scopes are a 2.16-meter general purpose instrument and the 4-meter Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) that is dedicated to surveys. LAMOST “is not very successful,” he adds, noting that its performance doesn’t match that of the 2.5-meter Sloan Digital Sky Survey telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. “You can imagine how much risk there is in leaping from this foundation to 12 meters!” Chen writes in the letter that was posted on WeChat, a popular Chinese social media platform.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Chen miscalculates LAMOST’s aperture, counter Xiangqun Cui, the instrument’s chief engineer who is at Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology, and Dingqiang Su, an astronomer at Nanjing University, in a joint WeChat response posted 8 August. They write that in terms of its engineering, the aperture is equivalent to almost 8 meters, thus it wouldn’t be a great leap to 12.Chen, Cui, and Su are all prestigious CAS academicians, adding spice to the acrimonious exchange, which is just the latest skirmish in an ongoing battle.Cui and her colleagues are behind the four-mirror design, which has a primary plus three secondary mirrors and relies on what they call an SYZ optical system, named using the initials of three designers who pioneered the scheme on the 2.16-meter telescope. A team from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan has proposed a more conventional Ritchey-Chrétien design that has a primary plus two secondary mirrors. They claim this simpler approach provides better resolution in the central field of view, and “generally better scientific performance.”In April, an international committee convened by CAS’s Center for Astronomical Mega-Science, which is responsible for the project, reviewed the competing designs and recommended the three-mirror option. On 10 July, Cui organized her own review committee that picked the SYZ design as better. Cui’s panel “leaned toward one side,” Chen says. And one member says that the three-mirror design was not sufficiently presented, partly because no one from the Huazhong team was there. Cui and Su explain in their open letter that a member of their own group who knows it well introduced the Huazhong design. “Members were repeatedly reminded they could abstain from voting,” they write. One-third of the 21 committee members did abstain.Meanwhile, to date, more than 130 young astronomers have signed an open letter to the astronomical community urging that the recommendations of the international panel be respected.The fundamental disagreement, according to Chen, is “whether a large science project should be technically or scientifically oriented.” Cui and Su say the choice is between incorporating “rapidly developing new technologies” that ensure a long life for the facility, or “simply replicating a 10-meter telescope built 30 years ago.”This week, more than 800 astronomers are attending the annual meeting of the Chinese Astronomical Society in Xinjiang. The 12-meter telescope battle is not on the program. The society “doesn’t want to cause embarrassment,” says one attendee who adds there is sure to be “a lot of [discussion] in private.”last_img read more

Roelant Oltmans to be India hockey coach till Olympics

first_imgHigh Performance Director Roelant Oltmans was on Saturday appointed coach of the Indian hockey team, replacing Paul van Ass, who was unceremoniously sacked after a bitter spat with Hockey India president Narinder Batra.The 61-year-old Dutchamn, who has been associated with Indian hockey for close to three years now, will be at the helm of affairs at least till next year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.The decision to appoint Oltmans was taken at a meeting between Sports Authority of India’s director general Injeti Srinivas and Batra.”Oltmans has agreed to be the coach till the Rio Olympics and we would want him to continue after that,” Batra told reporters after the meeting.Batra said that Van Ass’ ouster was a disappointing chapter but it was important for Indian hockey to move ahead.”We should move ahead, coaches come and go. We want to look ahead and prepare the team for the Olympics. we will talk to Oltmans about his requirements regarding the support staff and will give all possible assistance,” Batra said.Earlier on Friday, a nine-member committee headed by Olympian Harbinder Singh, formed to decide Van Ass’ future, recommended that the Dutchman should not be continued.Van Ass blamed an “autocratic” Batra for his ouster and said the recommendation to remove him did not come as a “surprise” to him.Oltmans has been associated with Indian hockey for nearly three years and to add to it, the players also gel well with him and some have even aired their views of handing the reins of the team to the Dutchman after Van Ass’ ouster.advertisementVan Ass, who was appointed at the end of January this year, was awarded a three-year contract till 2018. The World League semifinals in Antwerp, earlier this month, was the Dutchman’s second assignment with the Indian team.last_img read more

Wilmington Real Estate Transactions Week of August 20 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are the real estate transactions in Wilmington that occurred from August 20, 2019 to August 26, 2019:Address: 55 Adams StreetPrice: $742,500Buyer: Gregory & Matthew FurrierSeller: Robert Woods & Robin DonahueDate: 8/22/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 64,792 sfAddress: 24 Beacon StreetPrice: $405,000Buyer: William DelonaisSeller: Ivan & Susan CurtisDate: 8/22/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 22,500 sfAddress: 202 Federal StreetPrice: $810,000Buyer: David & Lindsey RalliSeller: Priscilla Wong & Igor UshakovDate: 8/23/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 46,913 sfAddress: 1 Foley Farm RoadPrice: $616,500Buyer: Michael FencerSeller: Lee Musto-Liburdi & Paul LiburdiDate: 8/23/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 52,331 sfAddress: 19 Green Meadow DrivePrice: $799,900Buyer: Brandon & Kelly ZatopekSeller: Elm Tree Development LLCDate: 8/21/19Use: Residential Developed LandLot Size: 21,407 sfAddress: 15 Grove AvenuePrice: $440,000Buyer: Erick UbedaSeller: Sarah HjelmstadDate: 8/23/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 8,200 sfAddress: 10 Kilmarnock StreetPrice: $539,000Buyer: Carlos & Pamela ScarpaSeller: Janet E. Lyons, TrusteeDate: 8/22/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 26,119 sfAddress: 441 Middlesex AvenuePrice: $640,000Buyer: Christina & Nicholas StatiresSeller: Cory & Rebecca VarneyDate: 8/22/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 25,970 sfAddress: 21 Presidential DrivePrice: $604,800Buyer: Hai & Yana ChoiSeller: Russell & Constance MorencyDate: 8/22/19Use: 1-Family ResidentialLot Size: 20,000 sfLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Real Estate Transactions (Week of August 13, 2019)In “Business”Recent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”Recent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”last_img read more

Spill CleanUp At Houston Ship Channel Maleah Davis Heckled In Courthouse METROs

first_imgMonday, May 13, 2019Top afternoon stories:U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Auxiliarist Rusty PumphreyCrews begin cutting into outer hull of capsized barge on May 13, 2019 at the Houston Ship Channel, near Bayport.Crews Continue Spill Clean-Up At Houston Ship ChannelCleanup crews continue responding to a collision in the Houston Ship Channel that spilled approximately 9,000 barrels of gasoline blend stock last Friday.The spill happened after a 755-foot tanker crashed into a tugboat that was pushing two barges. The tanker struck one of the barges and the other one capsized and remains aground just outside the channel.Salvage teams have secured the two barges in their current locations and continue to remove product from the damaged barge. Crews are preparing to perform salvage operations on the capsized barge.The flammable material that spilled is called reformate. Six skimmers are on the scene and have recovered more than 376 barrels of product-water mixture. In addition, responders have deployed more than 20,000 feet of boom, a temporary floating barrier, to control the spill.Houston Police Department via APThis undated photo released by the Houston Police Department shows Maleah Davis.Mother Of Maleah Davis Heckled In CourthouseThe mother of a missing 4-year-old Texas girl was heckled outside a courtroom on Monday by people who questioned if she had done enough to protect her daughter before her disappearance.Brittany Bowens, Maleah Davis’s mother, along with her spokesman, community activist Quanell X, showed up for a scheduled court hearing for Derion Vence, her former fiance who is charged in connection with the girl’s disappearance. The hearing was canceled, though, and Vence’s next hearing was scheduled for July 10. His attorney didn’t immediately reply to calls seeking comment.Vence, 26, has been charged with tampering with evidence, specifically a human corpse, though Maleah is still missing and authorities have declined to say whether they believe she is dead or Vence may have killed her.Initially, his bond was set at $1 million, but it was lowered to $45,000 on Monday, according to court records.Gail Delaughter/Houston Public MediaMetro light rail train at the Dryden Station.METRO’s Light Rail Red Line Is BackThe Red Line of METRO’s light rail in Houston is operating again, after crews completed repairs to overhead electrical wires on Sunday. The line runs from Northline/HCC Station to Fannin South.The repairs started last week because of two overhead electrical wires that broke recently. One wire broke near the Burnett Bridge along the Red Line and the other break occurred near the intersection of Dallas and Scott streets.The service along the Green and Purple lines is still suspended as work to reinforce electrical wires continues. Free bus shuttles are available along those routes to transport customers.The wires will be reinforced at more than 70 locations and METRO anticipates the entire project will be completed by the end of the week.Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaThis file Oct. 9 2019 photo shows Father Manuel La Rosa-Lopez leaving the Montgomery County Courthouse, in Conroe, after appearing in court.Conroe Priest Charged With Child Indecency Enters Not Guilty PleaManuel La Rosa-Lopez, a Houston-area Catholic priest charged on two counts of indecency with a child arising from child sex abuse allegations, was arraigned on Monday at the Montgomery County 435 District Court in Conroe and entered a not guilty plea.At the beginning of May, a Montgomery County grand jury indicted La Rosa-Lopez on two of four counts of child indecency charges.Montgomery County Assistant District Attorney Tyler Dunman told News 88.7 his office is still investigating the remaining allegations, which were made by multiple victims.The indictments are connected to allegations made by a female parishioner about incidents that happened in March 2001, while La Rosa-Lopez was a priest assigned to Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Conroe. His next court date is set for July 15. Sharelast_img read more