Robinson: Ill-disciplined Main let Motherwell down

first_imgBut Main angered his manager in the 71st minute when he fouled Stephen O’Donnell with a flailing arm before pushing the Killie right-back in the face. Referee Steven McLean showed him a yellow card for each offence.Robinson said: “Curtis Main let us down completely, I’m really cross about his lack of discipline. He probably should have been sent off for his first offence so I’ve absolutely no complaints about the decision.”On the injuries, Robinson said: “Losing three boys in the space of five minutes was something I’ve never experienced before but they say you never stop learning in management.“I have to give credit to the boys who were on the pitch because they gave me absolutely everything. Motherwell manager Stephen Robinson told Curtis Main he had let the club down after the striker was sent off in the 1-0 defeat to Kilmarnock.Robinson saw three of his centre-backs taken to hospital during the Ladbrokes Premiership game before Main’s two bookings in quick succession dented the hosts’ hopes of responding to Jordan Jones’ first-half strike.Robinson felt Jones’ winner was a “mis-hit cross” and did not use the injuries to Charles Dunne, Carl McHugh and Christian Mbulu as an excuse.Dunne and McHugh clashed heads in the 11th minute and substitute Mbulu was replaced in the 28th minute after going off with an eye problem. “Richard Tait went to centre-back and it was one of the best performances I’ve seen from a Motherwell player. That’s proper desire. He was top class. He won more headers than anyone else on the pitch.“Of course we’re not happy about losing the game – and we lost it to a mis-hit cross.“There was nothing in the game. Did we create enough? Maybe not but we were brave and we tried to move the ball about.”Robinson faces a challenging team selection for Saturday’s Lanarkshire derby at Hamilton. As well as the defensive problems, striker Ryan Bowman was absent after the club received a bid from an unnamed team.Robinson said: “Christian Mbulu potentially has a detached retina while the other two boys are concussed – and Carl has a history of that, of course.“Peter Hartley’s out with a calf problem and I’ve no idea whether he’ll be able to make it for Saturday. We may have an offer for Ryan Bowman, it came in very late in the day so we felt it was in everyone’s best interests that he wasn’t involved.”Jones disputed Robinson’s assessment of his goal after his ball from the left flank sailed into the far corner, but Killie boss Steve Clarke did not care.“Jordan said he saw the keeper a little bit off his line and curled it to the back post,” Clarke said.“Jordan will tell you it was a shot but it doesn’t really matter whether it was a shot or a cross, it was a good delivery into the box and it’s gone in the back of the net and got us three points.“The only disappointment for me was that we didn’t capitalise on the chances that we created second half. We should have made it a much more comfortable afternoon for the old manager sitting on the bench.”last_img read more

Great Smoky Mountains Association Announces Release of Cemeteries of the Smokies

first_imgFrom solitary, unmarked burials to church graveyards crowded with more than a hundred monuments, cemeteries of Great Smoky Mountains National Park are enduring historic treasures. And within the cemeteries distributed throughout the park, each somber monument offers insight into the hardships, personalities, economics and beliefs of the people who called the Smokies home.For Cemeteries of the Smokies author Gail Palmer of Maryville, TN, this book represents a historical passion project spanning two decades. This long-anticipated landmark work, published by Great Smoky Mountains Association in the style of a guidebook, features directions to all 152 known cemeteries within the park boundary and provides in-depth histories of each site alongside a complete listing of burials and dates, kinship links and epitaphs. No other known resource so thoroughly collects this depth of information in one place, displayed with color photographs, detailed lists, charts and an index of local family names.“While finishing my doctoral degree in cultural studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, I decided I wanted to write a book about the Smokies,” Palmer said. “I knew many of the cemeteries were hidden away from view in beautiful locations, sometimes only a few steps from a roadway or well-traveled trail.”At first, Palmer said, she believed she’d write a simple guidebook. She soon learned, however, that there were many more cemeteries than she ever imagined and there’d be nothing ‘simple’ about documenting all of them.“Even more importantly, I discovered fascinating and heartwarming stories about individuals who had lived and died in areas that are now a part of the national park, including members of my mother’s family,” she continued. “With much help from many people and many hours spent searching archival material, interviewing descendants and locating cemeteries, I began seeing the people of the Smokies, their dreams and their sorrows, more clearly.”Since the park’s creation, officials have noted a significant interest in the topic of cemeteries and ancestry, especially among local people attempting to trace their ancestry to the park. Rangers have answered hundreds of questions from visitors who ran across these historic sites while hiking.Cemeteries of the Smokies is divided into two sections: East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. On the Tennessee side of the Smokies, 77 known cemeteries are inside the park, with 2,726 graves; in North Carolina, there are 75 known cemeteries with 2,011 graves.“The park’s cemeteries and this book reveal so much about the lives of those hardy mountain families who called the Great Smoky Mountains home. The family ties, the community ties, fatih, economics, the heart-breaking frequency of infant mortality and the long, happy lives of so many others are all revealed,” said Steve Kemp, editor and publisher of Cemeteries of the Smokies. As a long-time GSMA staffer, Kemp’s involvement with the book’s development has also spanned many years. “There is no better source for historical research than our cemeteries, where the past truly is carved in stone. This book is for anyone who has ever happened upon a small cemetery in the back of beyond on a Smoky Mountain road or trail and wondered about the lives of those buried within.”In the Smokies, the preservation and decoration of family cemeteries is a time-honored tradition. Most mountain families still make regular pilgrimages to the resting places of their loved ones to host reunions and reflect on happy memories of their elders. For them, land in Great Smoky Mountains National Park is sacred. This book allows the reader to learn about the land, its people and their histories. More than that, it provides guidance to those who want to visit some of the places mentioned in the book, even the cemeteries that are not on most visitors’ agendas.“Cemeteries of the Smokies has been the longest project I have worked on,” GSMA Senior Publications Specialist Joey Heath said of her work on the book. “It took several years to complete, and every detail was researched, checked and checked again. We strived to create the most comprehensive book we could, and I believe we were successful. I am not saying the book is perfect, but we were diligent, and I hope readers will be pleased.”For Heath, the most interesting and important information contained in the book is that of the residents and their histories. “What makes Cemeteries of the Smokies so fascinating is not the precise details of a cemetery or who is buried there, but the lives and traditions of the mountain folk who lived here. The strength and resilience of mountain people defined them,” she said. GSMA will host a number of Cemeteries of the Smokies book signings with the author throughout the season. The first will be Saturday, Nov. 25, from 2-4 p.m. at GSMNP’s Sugarlands Visitor Center near Gatlinburg, Tenn.; followed on Sunday, Nov. 26, at Cades Cove Visitor Center, also in GSMNP, beginning at 10 a.m. The author will also be participating in a speaker series at Blount County Library in Maryville, Tenn., Dec. 7, at 6 p.m. Additional locations and dates are being planned and will be announced soon.Great Smoky Mountains Association’s publications are designed to enhance greater public understanding, enjoyment and appreciation of the national park. A national park partner, GSMA has provided more than $36 million to support the park’s educational, scientific and historical programs since its inception 65 years ago.Support for the association is achieved primarily from sales of educational publications and from annual membership dues. Those who wish to enrich their national park experience are encouraged to become GSMA members.last_img read more

Ivy League school joins UCT to fight HIV

first_img6 November 2013 The University of Cape Town has teamed up with US Ivy League school Brown University to develop a new cadre of HIV social scientists who can provide sustainable, interdisciplinary solutions to HIV/Aids in South Africa, where one in six adults has HIV. Around 6.2-million South Africans live with the disease – the world’s largest HIV-positive population. The project, named “Partnership for the Next Generation of HIV Social Science in South Africa”, will see the social sciences playing a greater role in the response to HIV. It will be run in UCT and Brown’s public health schools, and will be funded by the National Institute of Health at a cost of US$1.9-million over five years. The co-principal investigator from UCT is senior researcher Dr Christopher Colvin, an anthropologist in the Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research (CIDER) in the School of Public Health and Family Medicine. Colvin’s work integrates social science perspectives into public health research on HIV/Aids, gender, community health workers and health activism. “The social science and public health responses to HIV have both been tremendously important, and many at UCT are at the forefront of this research,” says Colvin. “However, these responses have often developed in parallel, rather than in close collaboration. This grant aims to integrate the social sciences into the core of our public health teaching and research on HIV in the school.” Brown’s participation will be led by South African-born Professor Mark Lurie, who has studied sub-Saharan Africa’s HIV epidemic for more than a decade.Opportunity “The new grant is a wonderful opportunity for Brown to contribute to training the next generation of South African social scientists, whose work is aimed at better understanding and preventing HIV infection in the country with the most severe epidemic,” says Lurie. The partnership will contribute to curricular development, training and professional development through collaborations with HIV-focused social and behavioural scientists at Brown. Outside of the classroom, it will also create opportunities for collaborative, interdisciplinary and innovative research in HIV social science, particularly at postgraduate and postdoctoral levels. Edited version of a story first published in UCT’s Monday Monthly. Published here with kind permission.last_img read more

Erik Buttlar Promoted to Vice President of Asset Protection at Best Buy

first_imgErik Buttlar has been promoted to vice president of asset protection at Best Buy. Buttlar began his career with Best Buy since 1990, serving as a store manager and regional media manager before becoming a director supporting merchandising, inventory, and loss prevention in northern California and the Pacific Northwest. In 2007, he was promoted to senior director of asset protection, a position he held up to his most recent promotion to vice president of asset protection.Buttlar is a strong supporter of the loss prevention/asset protection community and currently serves on the editorial board for LP Magazine.Congratulations Erik!- Sponsor – Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

First Look: Facebook’s New Timeline Design

first_imgScrolling Through Your PastWhen you start to navigate your profile in Timeline, you begin to see the power this has to bring back memories of past times. I only joined Facebook in 2007, as I wasn’t a U.S. college student. But even scrolling back just 4 years to 2007, I found myself reminiscing about the friends I added back then, photos of me (beardless!), the groups I joined, events I went to, and more. It’s worth noting that this will become even more powerful the more information about your life that you put on Facebook. As Marshall opined earlier today, over time your Facebook Timeline will become a digital equivalent of you. Conclusion: Big Vision From Facebook!In this post I’ve just covered the new Timeline profile. There is a lot more to explore in the upcoming new Facebook, including “social apps” that allow you to post about what music you’re listening to among other things (this appears to be invite only at this stage). The Timeline profile alone though is seriously impressive. It’s colorful, easily navigable and has the potential to become a wonderful memory bank for you – plus of course your family and friends. There are implications to that, including that you’re going to have to assess for yourself just how much information about your life you want to show in Facebook. Also you’ll need to decide how much effort you want to put in to update your Facebook with “life events” – for past events and as you start to add new ones.Overall, I think this is a big play by Facebook for future generations of Facebook users. Imagine starting from scratch with this Timeline design when you’re a teenager and over the years building up a life story about yourself within Facebook. That’s the big picture to this new Facebook Timeline. It’s a wide-reaching and strong vision.While I anticipate that a lot of current Facebook users won’t want to go through the hassle of updating their past activity, people will adjust over time and begin to add life events, share media and so on. Future Facebook users will just dive in head first.The Facebook Timeline will go live for all in the coming weeks. In the meantime, let us know what you think of the new design in the comments! Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification When you add a life event, it’s as simple as filling in a few fields. Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit richard macmanus Life Events: New Forms of Status UpdatesA key feature in the new Timeline profile is the ability to define different types of “life events.” The status update field now has 5 different icons: Work and Education, Family and Relationships, Living, Health and Wellness, Milestones and Experiences. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#Facebook#social networks#web One thing I’m really liking about this new design is how it encourages you to add photos, which makes your Facebook profile much more colorful. If you click one, for example ‘Living’, you are given a list of further options. The biggest announcement at Facebook’s f8 event in San Francisco today was a radical new profile design. Called Timeline, the new design turns your profile into a colorful, easily searchable timeline of your entire life – at least the parts of it on Facebook. The Timeline won’t go live until a few weeks, but you can set it up as a developer preview by following these instructions. This is a “Developer Release” version of Timeline, so it may be a little buggy.Here is a first look at Facebook’s Timeline, using my own Facebook account.Initial Set-upThe first thing you’re prompted to do is add a cover photo to your Timeline profile. I chose a photo from a past ReadWriteWeb Summit (see above). Also note the timeline navigation bar to the right of the cover photo. As you scroll down your profile page, you will see little dots in a central vertical timeline. Click the dots and it pops up with the update from that particular time (see below). Another key difference with this profile design is that your updates are segmented into boxes.You can control which things are emphasized in your profile by starring them. In the following example, I starred a photo I took at a local festival. This changed it from a half-page status update into a widescreen one. View ActivityFinally, it’s worth highlighting the ‘View Activity’ link, which is prominently displayed on your new profile. This is private to you. It lists all of your recent activity, allowing you to update privacy settings and more.last_img read more

NIH quietly shelves gun research program

first_img The funding stream “was mission critical to bringing me into a new area,” adds clinical psychologist Rinad Beidas of the University of Pennsylvania. Beidas won a grant to study how to implement gun safety counseling by pediatric primary care physicians to prevent youth suicide.A prominent gun rights advocacy group says the program is redundant, however, and charges that it is driven by an antigun animus. “Private groups and foundations donate millions of dollars to fund firearm research every year,” says Lars Dalseide, a spokesperson for the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action in Fairfax, Virginia. “When the government gets involved, and political agendas are allowed to supersede scientific analysis, the end product is nothing but a waste of tax-payer money.”Congress has long prohibited the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using government money “to advocate or promote gun control,” and in 2012 extended that restriction to other agencies in the Department of Health and Human Services. Obama argued, however, that research was not advocacy, and in response to his directive, NIH issued three funding opportunities for “Research on the Health Determinants and Consequences of Violence and its Prevention, Particularly Firearm Violence.” The application window would close in January 2017, the agency noted.A score of violence researchers and public health experts last November wrote to the agency’s lead official on the firearm research initiative, George Koob, director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, urging him to renew the program. “Think how many hundreds or thousands of [NIH] program announcements revolve around heart disease or cancer,” says Charles Branas of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, a longtime firearm researcher who signed the letter. “And they devoted one fleeting program announcement to this.”The $34 billion agency said last week that it is still evaluating the current program’s outcomes and has no timeline for a decision on its renewal.*Clarification: 21 November, 11:15 a.m.: This story has been changed to clarify that not all grants funded for $18 million under the research initiative specifically addressed firearm violence; some went to research on other kinds of violence. Specifically, 14 of the awards, accounting for $11.4 million of the $18 million, contain the words firearm, firearms, gun, guns, handgun, shootings or weapons in their title or abstract. AP Photo/Jessica Hill Parents leave a staging area after being reunited with their children following a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, where a gunman murdered 20 children and six educators on 14  December, 2012. Four years after then-President Barack Obama responded to the shooting deaths of 20 children and 6 adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, by ordering U.S. health agencies to sponsor gun research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has let lapse a funding program specifically calling for research on firearm violence and how to prevent it, Science has learned. Renewal of the program, which has funded 14-firearm related projects for $11.4 million over the past 3 years, “is still under consideration” a NIH spokesperson said on 6 September, although the agency stopped accepting proposals in January and the last new awards are now being launched.NIH told Science that scientists may still apply to do firearm research outside the program. Gun researchers say that’s not enough, noting that thematic funding programs signal NIH priorities to scientists. They can also help tilt grant decisions toward those in the highlighted area over others that are equally good, but outside it. “It’s really critically important to renew that program if we want more firearms research,” says Rina Das Eiden, a developmental psychologist at the State University of New York in Buffalo.Das Eiden and several collaborators won an award to study whether violence exposure and substance use raise the odds of gun violence in high-risk adolescents. “It would have been much harder for us to get funding for this research without that specific program announcement on firearm violence,” she says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img By Meredith WadmanSep. 13, 2017 , 12:13 PM NIH quietly shelves gun research programlast_img read more

Lab Accreditation Should Be Mandatory – Minister Hylton

first_imgMinister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, has expressed the view that laboratory accreditation should be mandatory, as is done in other territories.“I think the time has come for us to begin to consider this…the risks are too great,” the Minister emphasised. Currently, labs voluntarily seek out accreditation.Mr. Hylton was speaking on Tuesday, June 25, at the presentation of an accreditation certificate to Biomedical Caledonia Medical Laboratory, the first medical lab to receive the Jamaica National Agency for Accreditation (JNAAC) stamp of approval.Stressing the importance of the accreditation, Minister Hylton said Jamaica is on the verge of an economic transformation with the Global Logistics Hub initiative, and that all of the country’s operations must be able to withstand international testing and scrutiny, in order to effectively compete.“Providing accreditation for our health services will play a major role in that transformation and move us further towards the goals of making Jamaica the choice of place to live, work, raise families and do business,” he explained.Mr. Hylton added that accreditation of local medical labs to international standards is an important step in improving the quality of the health care for Jamaicans and foreigners.“Based on the cost/benefit assessment, there is a growing trend for hospitals in the US and the UK to outsource laboratory and diagnostic tests to developing countries, as it costs, on average, 70 to 80 per cent less,” he told the audience.In her remarks, Chief Executive Officer of JANAAC, Marguerite Domville, emphasised that the process of accreditation is a long one, but an effective health care system is required to: have medical labs that provide accurate results, within the meaningful timeframe that is needed for proper clinical management; and use appropriate lab procedures with respect to ethics, confidentiality and the safety of patients.“A medical lab accredited to the international standard ISO151 89 will deliver this type of high quality service, because a lot is required to meet this standard,” she stated.Mrs. Domville pointed out that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has reported that 70 per cent of clinical decision making is influenced by medical laboratory results.She informed that the medical laboratories requirement for quality and competence standard was developed with strong input from the medical, scientific and clinical international communities for use by medical labs, in developing their management systems, and maintaining their own competencies.The standard was also developed to allow accreditation bodies to confirm, or recognise the competence of these labs, through accreditation.“JANAAC, in conducting these assessments for accreditation, has used a team of technical experts to assess Biomedical lab and is satisfied that they have obtained objective evidence that indicate that this laboratory has satisfied all the criteria specified in this international standard, so you can feel confident when you use their services,” the CEO stated.As part of the accreditation process, there will be three consecutive years of surveillance, including review assessments, to ensure that the lab continues to fulfill the requirements, and at the end of four years, there will be a full reassessment, which is similar to the initial assessment, to ascertain the lab’s competence.Biomedical is the first medical lab in Jamaica to be accredited by JNAAC. The accreditation agency has so far awarded six accreditations to labs which have met the requirements of the international standard ISO/IEC 17-025. These labs are mainly concerned with food and environmental testing.Contact: Alphea Saunderslast_img read more

BOJ Governor Reports Low Inflation in April

first_img Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) Governor, Brian Wynter, says the 3.2 per cent rate of inflation recorded for April 2018, fell below the BOJ’s target range of four to six per cent. Additionally, he said it was lower than the 3.9 per cent out-turn for March 2018, and the 5.2 per cent recorded for December 2017, as reported by the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN). Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) Governor, Brian Wynter, says the 3.2 per cent rate of inflation recorded for April 2018, fell below the BOJ’s target range of four to six per cent.Additionally, he said it was lower than the 3.9 per cent out-turn for March 2018, and the 5.2 per cent recorded for December 2017, as reported by the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN).The Governor was speaking at the Bank’s quarterly media briefing, at the BOJ auditorium, downtown Kingston, on Monday (May 21).Mr. Wynter said the reduced rate of inflation was due mainly to the sharper-than-anticipated decline in agricultural prices since January 2018, reflecting a recovery in the sector’s output.The Governor said the lower rate also resulted from “an unusually sharp decline” in electricity costs in April.Mr. Wynter said based on these developments, the BOJ’s projection for inflation over the next fiscal year is slightly lower than the figure indicated in February.The projection then was for inflation to continue tracking around the lower half of the four to six per cent range.“The projected path now incorporates the impact of the decline in agricultural food prices that has occurred… and also the impact of the upturn of crude oil prices since July last year,” Mr. Wynter said, adding that the recent upturn in grain prices is also included.Meanwhile, the Governor said the risks to the inflation forecast are “skewed to the downside”.The major risks, he indicated, include weaker-than-anticipated domestic demand conditions, noting that adverse weather conditions may cause local agricultural crop prices to rise faster than expected; and slower-than-anticipated global economic growth.Mr. Wynter noted that the latter risk is associated with emerging geo-political tensions and protectionist policies that have surfaced over the last six months.Additionally, he said there is upside risk from higher-than-projected crude oil prices.“But our current assessment is that crude oil prices will likely fall as geopolitical uncertainties wane and the impact of excess supplies prevails on the market,” Mr. Wynter said. Mr. Wynter said the reduced rate of inflation was due mainly to the sharper-than-anticipated decline in agricultural prices since January 2018, reflecting a recovery in the sector’s output. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Fort St John Petroleum Association hosts 10th Annual Oilmens Family Camp Weekend

first_imgThe Oilman of the Year award went to Art Jarvis, with Dave Marshall receiving the Ivor Miller Award.Oilmen’s President Dustin Stirling and Local MP Bob Zimmer were in attendance to congratulate and thank the oilmen for their continued support and involvement in the oil and gas industry. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Petroleum Association held their 10th Annual Oilmen’s Family Camp over the weekend at Peace Island Park in Taylor.This event was an opportunity for the entire family to enjoy a weekend of camping, boating, barbeques and even a duck race.On Saturday, the Oilmen held an awards ceremony where they honoured two of their members for their ongoing involvement and support in the oil and gas industry.last_img read more

Your Guide To The 2019 NCAA Womens Tournament

The early release of the women’s NCAA Tournament bracket on Monday afternoon actually did fans a favor: If any year merits having additional time to fill out a bracket, this year is it. Three different teams were ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press poll this season, and a storyline has been how open the competition was for the top spots in each region. ESPN’s Mechelle Voepel wrote on Monday night that this year’s NCAA Tournament “might be as wide open as any since 2006,” with as many as seven teams that could legitimately cut down the net on April 7.Luckily, FiveThirtyEight’s March Madness prediction model is here to guide you as you make your picks. You can read about how the model works here or keep reading to learn what the model predicts for the top seeds, which teams could make an unexpected run and which squads could bow out sooner than expected. We’re also highlighting the best first-round matchups to help you schedule your Friday and Saturday around women’s hoops. Top seedsThe four No. 1 seeds are Baylor, Notre Dame, Louisville and Mississippi State. You read that right: UConn is not a top seed for the first time since 2006. But the Huskies are still a No. 2 seed, and they still got a regional nearby, in Albany, New York. The Huskies will host the first two rounds in Storrs, and their fans have packed Albany regionals for years — so they would essentially have home-court advantage until the Final Four. That’s a tough setup for the region’s No. 1 seed, Louisville, and the FiveThirtyEight model reflects that, giving UConn a 68 percent chance and Louisville a 24 percent chance of making the Final Four. But the Cardinals did beat UConn in January, as star guard Asia Durr scored a game-high 24 points. That win should give Louisville confidence as it chases its second straight Final Four appearance.The selection committee created a similar setup out west, where Mississippi State is the No. 1 seed and Oregon is the No. 2. With each team hosting the first two rounds and the regional rounds being played in Portland, Oregon could make its first Final Four without leaving the state. The model gives the Ducks a 51 percent chance of doing just that behind triple-double queen Sabrina Ionescu, who could be the first pick in the WNBA draft if she declares. Mississippi State, which secured its No. 1 seed after winning its first-ever SEC tournament title, has a 44 percent chance of making the Final Four and a 10 percent chance of winning a national title. The latter would be a storybook ending for the national runners-up in each of the past two seasons.The Greensboro, North Carolina, region is a hotbed of low-post talent, starting with the No. 1 overall seed in Baylor. The Lady Bears have had a dominant season to date, running their record to 31-1 and leading the nation in blocked shots, defensive rebounds and opponent field-goal percentage. The 6-foot-7 Kalani Brown and 6-foot-4 Lauren Cox have combined to average more than 28 points, 16 rebounds and 4 blocks per game. Not to be outdone, No. 2 seed Iowa has espnW’s national player of the year in 6-foot-3 Megan Gustafson. According to Her Hoop Stats, Gustafson is both the nation’s top scorer, putting up 28.0 points per game, and the nation’s most efficient scorer, recording 1.44 points per scoring attempt and shooting just under 70 percent from the field. There are several low-post standouts among the lower-seeded teams as well, but Baylor projects to be the best in Greensboro, with a 76 percent chance of making the Final Four.Although Baylor is the No. 1 overall seed, it’s the top seed in the Chicago region, Notre Dame, that has the best chance of winning a national championship. The FiveThirtyEight model gives the defending champs a 30 percent chance of repeating and Baylor a 28 percent chance at its first title since 2012. The Fighting Irish returned all but one starter from last year’s team and then led the country in points per game while playing the nation’s toughest schedule. Notre Dame’s chief competition in Chicago will likely be No. 2 seed Stanford, the Pac-12 tournament champions and the only team to beat Baylor this season. Under head coach Tara VanDerveer, the Cardinal have a 56 percent chance to make the Elite Eight but just an 8 percent chance to advance to the Final Four.SleepersA pair of 4-seeds could knock off some of the favorites in the Sweet 16. In Albany, Oregon State has a 21 percent chance of making the Elite Eight, potentially displacing Louisville, while South Carolina has a 10 percent chance of doing the same to Baylor in Greensboro. Oregon State finished third in what was perhaps the nation’s deepest conference, the Pac-12, and ranks fourth in the nation in 3-point shooting at 38.8 percent. If the Beavers, particularly star guard Destiny Slocum, get hot from deep, they could extend their stay on the East Coast to the Final Four. Under head coach and former Virginia point guard Dawn Staley, South Carolina also has electric guard play, which could set up a fascinating game of contrasts against Baylor in the Sweet 16. Don’t count Staley out as she chases her second national championship in the past three seasons.Also in the Greensboro region, No. 3 North Carolina State has received relatively little attention compared with ACC rivals Louisville and Notre Dame despite starting the season 21-0. (NC State didn’t lose a game until February!) The Wolfpack would not have to leave their home state to make the Final Four, and the FiveThirtyEight model gives the team almost the same chances as No. 2 seed Iowa of advancing to the Elite Eight (40 percent versus 42 percent).BustsIt’s perhaps a sign of progress that a mid-major team can even be considered for this category, but Gonzaga, the No. 5 seed in the Albany region, probably won’t see it that way if this prediction proves true. Gonzaga is vulnerable after two players suffered season-ending leg injuries in its conference tournament semifinal. The model still gives the Bulldogs an 87 percent chance of beating Arkansas-Little Rock, but a team that was ranked in the top 25 for parts of this season and had aspirations of hosting the first two rounds as a top-4 seed surely has its sights set higher than one NCAA Tournament win.No. 4 Texas A&M has also had injury concerns, although the school recently announced that leading scorer Chennedy Carter (22.5 points per game) will play in the NCAA Tournament. She is returning from a hand injury, though, and if her shot isn’t falling, Texas A&M could struggle with a tough Wright State team that holds opponents to just 36.2 percent shooting, which ranks 24th in the nation.Speaking of tough mid-major teams, the state of Florida has a couple that will start the NCAA Tournament in Miami. No. 5 seed Arizona State can’t be happy about traveling all the way across the country to play No. 12-seed UCF in their backyard, and the Sun Devils have only a 69 percent chance of winning one game and a 26 percent chance of winning two games in the Sunshine State. Meanwhile, host and No. 4 seed Miami has an 82 percent chance of beating No. 13 seed Florida Gulf Coast, but there are signs of a potential upset here. FGCU is ranked only three spots behind Miami in the Her Hoop Stats ratings (the teams rank 28th and 25th, respectively) and is dangerous behind the arc: Nearly half of FGCU’s shot attempts are 3-pointers, which ranks second nationally, while Miami is letting teams score more than one-third of their points from three, which ranks 320th nationally.Fun first-round matchupsIf you’re looking for two senior stars trying to extend their careers, watch No. 8 seed California take on No. 9 seed North Carolina on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Eastern time. Kristine Anigwe has had a historic season for the Golden Bears and leads the nation in rebounding with 16.3 per game, including a 32-point, 30-rebound effort against Washington State two weeks ago. North Carolina ranks in the bottom third of teams nationally in rebounding rate, so one might predict a long afternoon for the Tar Heels, but their offensive firepower can keep them in any game. (Just ask Notre Dame and NC State, which both lost to North Carolina in the span of a week earlier this year.) Guard Paris Kea is the star (17.1 points per game), but three other players average double-figure scoring and a fourth averages 9.5 points per game.FiveThirtyEight model’s prediction: California over North Carolina (64 percent)If you’re looking for a battle between mid-major powerhouses, don’t miss No. 6 seed South Dakota State versus No. 11 seed Quinnipiac on Saturday at 11 a.m. Eastern time. Both teams have been to the tournament before: SDSU won its ninth automatic bid in 11 years this season, while QU is in for the fifth time in seven seasons and made a Sweet 16 appearance in 2017. SDSU boasts the Summit League’s all-time leading scorer in Macy Miller, who is averaging 18.1 points per game this season while shooting nearly 55 percent from the floor. But Quinnipiac could make things tough for Miller and the Jackrabbits: The Bobcats hold opponents to just 50.5 points per game, second-best in the nation, and their 11.5 steals per game rank sixth nationally. Whichever way this game goes, the winner could be a sleeper pick to knock off No. 3 Syracuse and make the Sweet 16.FiveThirtyEight model’s prediction: South Dakota State over Quinnipiac (65 percent)Finally, if you’re looking for toss-ups, the three games that our model gives the most even odds are:No. 10 Buffalo vs. No. 7 Rutgers, Friday at 4:30 p.m. Eastern time (Buffalo has a 51 percent chance of winning)No. 10 Auburn vs. No. 7 BYU, Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Eastern time (Auburn has a 55 percent chance of winning)No. 6 UCLA vs. No. 11 Tennessee, Saturday at 1 p.m. Eastern time (UCLA has a 56 percent chance of winning)Check out our latest March Madness predictions.Neil Paine contributed research. read more