Lily’s Best (Summer) Week Ever: Disney Cruise Line

first_imgThis is my last article of the summer. In a couple weeks, I’ll be going back to school. So I want to say thank you to some people. Thank you to Ms. Laurel for letting me write about my summer. Thank you also to my mom and dad for taking me places. Thank you to everybody reading this and for all the nice comments. I hope your summer has been as fun as mine. And I’ll see you real soon! Share This!Hi, it’s Lily again. I’ve got an exciting surprise this week for the grand finale for my best summer week ever. I went on a cruise. I went on a Disney cruise. I went on an 11-night cruise on the Disney Fantasy! I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. I traveled with my parents and two of my grandparents (my mom’s parents).We got on board and had lunch at Enchanted Garden. Then we went up to the room on deck 9. This is the view from my balcony. We were parked next to a Carnival ship.The sail away party was inside because it was raining outside and people might slip. It’s interesting to watch the sail away party inside. It was very crowded.After we left, it stopped raining, and there was a rainbow!On this cruise, there were four sea days, and I went to the AquaLab on some of them. The AquaLab is a lab run by Huey, Dewey, and Louie. The water is leaking from different parts of the lab. You can even “run” the AquaDuck. It’s a LOT of fun and you get VERY wet.My grandparents and dad went to an animation class. We learned how to make a scene using animation, and we learned how to draw Winnie the Pooh.I spent a lot of time in the kids’ club. There are many different rooms and areas. The first side is the Club, and the other side is the Lab. In the Club, there is Andy’s Room, an indoor playground. There’s Pixie Hollow, which is a craft room. Then, there is the Star Wars room, which has a lot of electronics. You can fly your own ship. This is a picture of me in the Marvel room. It’s based off of a Marvel school. I am playing with one of the magic portals that Doctor Strange uses. On the Lab side, there is a craft studio, an animation studio, Pirate’s Cove (which is a place where you can sit down and relax and play on iPads), and the media lounge (where you can sit down and watch movies). There is also a gaming area in between the Club and the Lab with cafeteria tables and board games.This is me with my grandma and grandpa. We are making our own passports for arts and crafts time.I decided to get a treat before formal night dinner. We went to Sweet on You, an ice cream and sweets shop. There is ice cream, gelato, candy, and more, but I got two macarons. My favorite was the vanilla one. The chocolate was too much.This is the atrium on deck 3. There are balconies on decks 4 and 5. I was dancing to the music playing before we had dinner. The atrium is beautiful!One of my favorite things to do on a sea day is the Mickey 200. The Mickey 200 is where you carve a potato and a carrot to make a race car. Then, we race the race cars on a ramp. Most of the race cars break at the end. I like doing it. This time, my race car didn’t break. I did not win, though. It definitely won the award for sturdiest if they had a prize for that.Our first port was Aruba. As you can see, it’s One Happy Island!On Aruba we went on a port adventure. At our first stop, we saw this unique-colored lizard.At our next stop, I ordered a pastechi. It is a pastry filled with different ingredients. The one I got was a pastechi filled with cheese. I liked it.Then we went on a boat and a submarine. We saw a shipwreck from the submarine.We also saw lots of fish. They were eating stuff that was on the submarine.In the evenings, there were different featured shows. This show is a magic show. People were allowed to get up and examine the trunk for the magic show to make sure there was no fake lock, opening, or anything. We also wrote our names on it to see if it got switched out during the act. It was pretty incredible.We got to celebrate the 4th of July at sea. It was going to be a late night, so I got a chocolate coffee from Vista Cafe. It made me so I could stay up late and it was taaasty! There was a fireworks show and dance party for the 4th of July.The fireworks were amazing!Our next port was Barbados. This is a picture of one of the homes in Barbados and some land on the beach.We went to Orchid World. There were many different types of flowers. But my favorite thing was the turtle fountain in one of the greenhouses. I love my turtles!Next we went to Martinique. A thing different about Martinique is they speak French there. My daddy knows a little bit of French, and that’s the most in our family. We were able to manage, though. We walked to the Fort St. Louis. We didn’t get to tour it because tours left every hour and we came at 9:15. It would be another 45 minutes before we could get a tour. Instead, we walked around the outside. It’s a decent sized fort.We stopped for ice cream because it was hot out. I got the chocolate ice cream. We think it was dark chocolate. It was very rich but good!This is the towel animal we got on Pirate Night. We think it was supposed to be Davy Jones. I’ve seen all the Pirates movies except the most recent one. I saw them on other Disney cruises. You can watch them on TV on demand in the stateroom.In St. Kitts, we wandered around the town. This is a picture of a fountain in one of the local parks.At night after we left St. Kitts, we saw a lot of lights. It was an island. It looked a lot like a star formation, though. Those lights are going up a hill on the island.We ordered a All Hands on Deck–a cheese platter–from room service. My favorite was the cheddar (the orange cheese).On a sea day, my dad entered Chip-It Golf. Goofy and Max decided to play too. My daddy scored some points, but then lost them all on the double point ball. But he scored better than Goofy! (Only Max scored a few points for the Goofy and Max team.)We met up with one of my dad’s sisters when we stopped in Puerto Rico. We walked up to the fort, and saw an iguana.We also saw a crab!On our last sea day, we did hide and seek with the ship’s officers. They made themselves dress up as different people. Our cruise director, Trent, dressed up as Diane from Merchandise. She took over the announcements one time, too. It was very funny.There were all kinds of special shows on this cruise. Some of the theater people and Christina who does bingo did a show where you had to guess whether they were telling the truth or a lie about very funny words. Christina’s dress was made of bingo cards! She said one of them was a winning one.Our final stop was Disney’s Private Island, Castaway Cay. One of the things we did was the family whale dig. Mickey decided to show up, too.I went swimming in the ocean and I was looking for fish. I found a lot of fish. Some were near the beach. They were pretty big. There was one lady in the water who was afraid of the fish. But I’m not afraid of fish!last_img read more

First European Tour win for Otto

first_img12 May 2008After seven wins on South African soil Hennie Otto finally broke his European Tour duck by scoring an outstanding victory in the Italian Open at the Castello di Tolcinasco Golf and Country Club in Milan on Sunday.Towards the end of March, Otto had narrowly missed out on his first European Tour win; he took a five-shot lead he took into the final round of the Madeira Islands Open, but ended up in a playoff against Alastair Forsyth, which the Scot won.Stunning formOn Sunday, the circumstances were similar to six weeks earlier in Portugal; Otto enjoyed a four-shot lead heading into the final round.He had been superb through the first three rounds; after opening with a seven-under-par 65, he turned in a strong 66, followed by a scintillating nine-under 63 in the third round for a stunning three-round total of 22-under-par 194. That left him only one shot behind the European Tour record for three rounds, jointly shared by South Africa’s Ernie Els and David Howell of England.Given his form in the first three rounds, it was a solid bet that Otto would take victory. It duly came, but it didn’t come easily.Early on, it looked as if the South African would cruise to victory after he increased his lead to five shots by sinking birdies on three of the first five holes. England’s Oliver Wilson was on the charge, however, and put Otto under pressure.Wilson on the chargeAfter his opening birdie blitz, Otto played six holes to par, but then dropped a shot on the twelfth. Wilson, meanwhile, was four-under through the front nine and then nailed four birdies in succession from the eleventh to the fourteenth.The Englishman settled for par on the last four holes to finish with a fine eight-under-par 64 and a total of 264.After dropping a shot at the twelfth, Otto immediately pulled one back with a birdie on the thirteenth. In much the same manner as Wilson, he played to par the rest of the way to complete his round in three-under-par 69 for a 25-under total of 263.His total was the lowest in the Italian Open since it was added to the European Tour, bettering the 265 recorded by Francesco Molinari in 2006. It was also the lowest winning total so far on the Tour this season.Useful experienceAfterwards, reflecting on his win, the 31-year-old from Boksburg said his disappointment at the Madeira Islands Open helped him stay focused when he saw his lead slipping away. In the end, he played a superb drive on the final hole, with one foot in a bunker, onto the green, to ensure he captured his maiden title in Europe.He felt his putting had let him down in Portugal. This time around, he said, his putting, especially from distance, is what won him the tournament.Otto’s winnings totalled €283 330, which when converted to rands is in excess of R3.33-million. As importantly as the winning purse, his victory earned him an exemption on the European Tour until the end of 2010; it is a bonus that is hard to put a price on.World rankingOtto entered the Italian Open ranked 154th in the world. After his win he is now ranked 76th, a massive rise of 78 places. His is one of nine South Africans ranked within the top 100.Ernie Els tops the list, in third, followed by Rory Sabbatini, in fourteenth, and US Masters champion Trevor Immelman in sixteenth. Retief Goosen is in 30th place, Richard Sterne is ranked 39th, and Tim Clark 45th. Louis Oosthuizen follows, in 74th spot, with Otto two places behind him, and Charl Schwartzel in 85th place.Italian Open LeaderboardHennie Otto (RSA) 263 (-25)Oliver Wilson (Eng) 264 (-24)Robert Karlsson (Swe) 265 (-23)Philip Archer (Eng) 267 (-21)Marcel Siem (Ger) 267 (-21) South AfricansDavid Frost (RSA) 276 (-12)Charl Schwartzel (RSA) 280 (-8) Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

First Look: Facebook’s New Timeline Design

first_imgScrolling Through Your PastWhen you start to navigate your profile in Timeline, you begin to see the power this has to bring back memories of past times. I only joined Facebook in 2007, as I wasn’t a U.S. college student. But even scrolling back just 4 years to 2007, I found myself reminiscing about the friends I added back then, photos of me (beardless!), the groups I joined, events I went to, and more. It’s worth noting that this will become even more powerful the more information about your life that you put on Facebook. As Marshall opined earlier today, over time your Facebook Timeline will become a digital equivalent of you. Conclusion: Big Vision From Facebook!In this post I’ve just covered the new Timeline profile. There is a lot more to explore in the upcoming new Facebook, including “social apps” that allow you to post about what music you’re listening to among other things (this appears to be invite only at this stage). The Timeline profile alone though is seriously impressive. It’s colorful, easily navigable and has the potential to become a wonderful memory bank for you – plus of course your family and friends. There are implications to that, including that you’re going to have to assess for yourself just how much information about your life you want to show in Facebook. Also you’ll need to decide how much effort you want to put in to update your Facebook with “life events” – for past events and as you start to add new ones.Overall, I think this is a big play by Facebook for future generations of Facebook users. Imagine starting from scratch with this Timeline design when you’re a teenager and over the years building up a life story about yourself within Facebook. That’s the big picture to this new Facebook Timeline. It’s a wide-reaching and strong vision.While I anticipate that a lot of current Facebook users won’t want to go through the hassle of updating their past activity, people will adjust over time and begin to add life events, share media and so on. Future Facebook users will just dive in head first.The Facebook Timeline will go live for all in the coming weeks. In the meantime, let us know what you think of the new design in the comments! Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification When you add a life event, it’s as simple as filling in a few fields. Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit richard macmanus Life Events: New Forms of Status UpdatesA key feature in the new Timeline profile is the ability to define different types of “life events.” The status update field now has 5 different icons: Work and Education, Family and Relationships, Living, Health and Wellness, Milestones and Experiences. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#Facebook#social networks#web One thing I’m really liking about this new design is how it encourages you to add photos, which makes your Facebook profile much more colorful. If you click one, for example ‘Living’, you are given a list of further options. The biggest announcement at Facebook’s f8 event in San Francisco today was a radical new profile design. Called Timeline, the new design turns your profile into a colorful, easily searchable timeline of your entire life – at least the parts of it on Facebook. The Timeline won’t go live until a few weeks, but you can set it up as a developer preview by following these instructions. This is a “Developer Release” version of Timeline, so it may be a little buggy.Here is a first look at Facebook’s Timeline, using my own Facebook account.Initial Set-upThe first thing you’re prompted to do is add a cover photo to your Timeline profile. I chose a photo from a past ReadWriteWeb Summit (see above). Also note the timeline navigation bar to the right of the cover photo. As you scroll down your profile page, you will see little dots in a central vertical timeline. Click the dots and it pops up with the update from that particular time (see below). Another key difference with this profile design is that your updates are segmented into boxes.You can control which things are emphasized in your profile by starring them. In the following example, I starred a photo I took at a local festival. This changed it from a half-page status update into a widescreen one. View ActivityFinally, it’s worth highlighting the ‘View Activity’ link, which is prominently displayed on your new profile. This is private to you. It lists all of your recent activity, allowing you to update privacy settings and more.last_img read more

Cartoon: A Thicker Skin

first_imgrob cottingham 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts So it’s happened again: a company comes under fire for some misdeed — perceived or actual — and gets a few critical comments on their Facebook Page. And their crisis communications strategy is to pour gasoline on that little flame by deleting those comments.The latest folks to do this are the people at ChapStick, who ran a print ad that offended a few folks. Those critics posted their complaints on ChapStick’s Facebook page (most of them quite civil). ChapStick’s page administrators then deleted the comments; this case adds an ironic new wrinkle because of the ad copy pointing people to their Facebook presence, which reads “Be heard.”After enduring a torrent of criticism for deleting the criticism, ChapStick posted an apology for the ad and a sort-of explanation for deleting the comments, saying they follow Facebook guidelines and “remove posts that use foul language, have repetitive messaging, those that are considered spam-like (multiple posts from a person within a short period of time) and are menacing to fans and employees.” Which, with most of the comments, wasn’t the case.It seems to bear repeating: brands, learn to take some criticism on your social web presences. Why? Because…Accusations of suppressing those comments are often more damaging than the original criticisms themselves.The presence of critical comments gives the conversation happening on your Facebook Page, blog or other presence a sense of authenticity. That means the positive user comments carry more weight than they would if your site had nothing but obsequious flattery.A critical comment can be an opportunity for engagement on your part. It’s your chance to answer a criticism, resolve a complaint, correct some misinformation. And you may be catching a little issue before it becomes a much bigger one.A critical comment can be an spur to participation and conversation by your community. Let’s face it; for most brands and organizations, excess participation usually isn’t the problem with their Facebook pages.So maybe it’s time to learn to love the negative. A thicker skin not only saves you from the sting of a little criticism; it can let you realize from genuine benefit… and keep you from becoming the latest high-profile case study in why comment deletion can backfire.See more of Rob’s Noise to Signal cartoons herecenter_img Tags:#Cartoons#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

First U.S.-based group to edit human embryos brings practice closer to clinic

first_imgPostfertilization editing Healthyegg Egg’sDNA An earlier edit Introducing CRISPR machinery at the point of fertilization appeared to eliminate patchy genome repair known as mosaicism. Mutated sperm and CRISPR introduced The ethical and practical debates over using the DNA-editing method CRISPR to alter human embryos just got less hypothetical. A week after the news leaked out, a U.S.-based team has published the first rigorous demonstration that CRISPR can efficiently repair a gene defect in human embryos—one that would cause a potentially deadly heart condition—without introducing new mutations elsewhere. Although none of the labmade embryos were transferred into women, the research team, led by embryologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) in Portland, says the success paves the way for using the technique in the clinic to prevent the transmission of genetic disease.Because their approach appears to avoid the problems of patchy and imprecise editing seen in previous CRISPR tests on human embryos, the researchers claim it’s a viable strategy for rescuing mutated embryos that would otherwise be screened out of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. But evidence of the technique’s long-term safety is still lacking, and many researchers and ethicists have argued that germline editing—making permanent, heritable changes to the genome that could correct genetic disease, but also theoretically introduce other designer traits—should for now be limited to research exploring basic biology.“I’m uncomfortable, honestly, with the sort of stated purpose of this study,” says Jennifer Doudna, a molecular biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who is among the pioneers of the CRISPR method. “It’s not about research, I don’t think. It’s about how we get to a clinical application of this technology.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Mitalipov’s lab has navigated ethically complicated embryo research before. He advanced a technique to prevent the transmission of disease-causing mutations in a woman’s mitochondria, organelles with their own genes, by transferring her nuclear DNA into a donor egg, which is controversial because any offspring would inherit DNA from three individuals.But the CRISPR editing project was especially hard to sell to his university, Mitalipov says. He first made the proposal to OHSU’s institutional review board about 3 years ago. His plan was to use CRISPR—a DNA-cutting enzyme and an RNA that guides it to a target sequence—to slice into the gene MYBPC3 at the site of a mutation that leads to an enlarged heart and can cause sudden cardiac arrest, even in young, seemingly healthy athletes. The researchers would also insert short DNA strands bearing the healthy gene sequence. Then they would rely on a human embryo’s natural ability to repair cuts in its DNA, hoping it would use the healthy sequence as a template.The university set up two committees to judge the proposal, one evaluating its ethics and the other its scientific merits. Some of their members—kept anonymous even from Mitalipov—were hesitant to sign off, he says. The three other published human embryo–editing experiments, all from Chinese research teams using small numbers of embryos, have suggested that CRISPR’s enzyme sometimes cuts unintended targets in the DNA. They also produced embryos that were mosaic: A portion of their cells contained the healthy gene, whereas others kept the mutated one. Committee members thus worried the technique was too inefficient and risky to improve on current IVF procedures, Mitalipov recalls.Others questioned whether CRISPR technology was needed at all. A person carrying a mutated copy of the MYBPC3 gene still has a 50% chance of passing on the other, healthy copy, and doctors can already screen out mutated embryos during IVF. (People with two mutated copies of the gene are more rare, and their condition is more severe.) Mitalipov pushed back against reluctant committee members with his own take. “Discarding 50% of embryos [in IVF], knowing that you could actually correct the mutation, is morally wrong,” he told them.Because the work required creating and destroying human embryos, it was barred from receiving U.S. government funding. The OHSU lab used institutional funds; collaborators at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, relied on funding from three charitable foundations; Korean and Chinese collaborators also got federal or regional funding to help with the project.The OHSU group collected eggs from healthy women recruited and compensated for the research, and sperm from a man whom the OHSU’s cardiovascular institute had identified as having one mutated copy of MYBPC3. Instead of injecting the CRISPR system hours after the egg is fertilized, as in previous published experiments, they added it right alongside the sperm, hoping to prevent mosaicism by catching the new embryo before it had a chance to divide and make copies of the mutated gene. And to reduce the chance of cuts at unintended parts of the genome, they relied on a short-lived version of CRISPR, whose enzyme and guide RNA wouldn’t stick around in the cell after making their initial edit. G. Grullón/Science SpermDNAVariationsin repairCRISPR added as DNA replicatesMosaicembryo Human embryos, newly fertilized (left) and at the eight-cell stage (right), that had DNA edited by CRISPR. Sperm withmutation By Kelly ServickAug. 2, 2017 , 1:00 PMcenter_img Simultaneous injectionCRISPR First U.S.-based group to edit human embryos brings practice closer to clinic Egg’sDNA Nucleus Corrected sperm DNA HealthyeggUniformhealthy embryo Shoukhrat Mitalipov Of 58 IVF embryos that developed after the CRISPR injection, nearly three-quarters managed to repair the paternal MYBPC3. None of these successfully edited embryos harbored cells with the mutated gene, the researchers reported this week in Nature. And they found no evidence that CRISPR had cut outside the intended site.Unexpectedly, all but one of the embryos repaired the sliced MYBPC3 using the existing healthy copy of the gene (inherited from the egg donor), instead of the added template. Compared with more developed cells, maybe the early embryo “evolved to more efficiently repair errors in the DNA,” says Jun Wu, a stem cell biologist at Salk and a collaborator on the project. (Mitalipov cautions, however, that the repair process at work in these embryos is unlikely to be efficient if an embryo inherits mutated versions of a disease-causing gene from both parents. In such cases, researchers would need a more effective DNA template, Mitalipov says.)“This paper seems to allay many of the concerns about risk,” says George Daley, a stem cell researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital and dean of Harvard Medical School in Boston, “but it’s really, really important not to overinterpret and generalize.” Efficiency and the risk of off-target editing can vary based on the targeted gene, he notes.To some clinicians, even a slight increase in the healthy IVF embryo pool for certain couples seems justification enough for turning to CRISPR. Even if half of the embryos don’t inherit a mutated gene, those with the healthy gene may bear other abnormalities in older parents, and finding a viable one through screening can be difficult, says James Grifo, a reproductive endocrinologist at New York University’s Langone Medical Center in New York City. “I don’t think we should be alarmist about these possibilities of treating and avoiding disease.”But earlier this year, a committee convened by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine in Washington, D.C., took a different position: that clinical use of germline editing could be allowed, but only in situations where a couple otherwise has no chance of a healthy biological child. In the new study, “we already have a case that challenges [those] criteria,” says Jeffrey Kahn, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and a member of the panel. “As these kinds of research findings accumulate … at what point will somebody say it’s time to use this in a clinical context?”Mitalipov shares the concern that embryo editing will be used in the clinic before it’s fully understood. Congress prohibits the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from approving clinical trials involving embryo editing. But despite a similar restriction on the mitochondrial method Mitalipov pioneered, a U.S. fertility specialist used it last fall to produce an apparently healthy baby in Mexico. As Mitalipov’s team continues to optimize the gene-editing technique for a possible clinical trial, “we’re not going to transfer [embryos to a uterus] without oversight,” he says. But, he adds, “the private clinics will be using it one way or another.”last_img read more

Four ways to inject social contagion into your outreach in 2012

first_imgA recent review of more than 20 academic papers on social contagion, published in the book Consumer Insights: Findings From Behavioral Research, shows that consumers are heavily influenced not only by word of mouth – which we all know by now — but also by merely observing the behaviors of others, even if no communication takes place.In your outreach in 2012, make sure that you keep this in mind. Here are some ideas on how to apply these findings:1. Include social sharing links in all of your outreach to encourage word of mouth2. Include a quote from a donor about why they support you on your home page3. Have beneficiaries write your acknowledgements to encourage work of mouth4. Have donors or volunteers write your next appeal, with details on why they support youRemember, you are rarely as effective a messenger as your supporters are.last_img read more

Victoria Jubilee Hospital Receives Equipment

first_img The charity will also be donating two blood pressure machines and other equipment to the Kingston Public Hospital. The Victoria Jubilee Hospital has received medical equipment valued at US$6,700 from United Kingdom-based charity, Rejuvenate Jamaica Hospitals, to improve its neonatal services.The equipment, five incubators and five phototherapy devices, were handed over during a ceremony held on February 22, at the hospital’s North Street address in Kingston.The charity will also be donating two blood pressure machines and other equipment to the Kingston Public Hospital.In her remarks at the ceremony, Chief Executive Officer of the Kingston Public Hospital and Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Colleen Wright, expressed gratitude for the donation.Proud parents, Diane Shand (second right) and Jeffrey Richards (right) show their newborn twins, Malik and Malia to Consultant Paediatrician, Neonatal Care Unit, Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Dr. Yanique Brown (left). Others are (from second left): Registered Nurse, Tamara Campbell; Chief Executive Officer of the Kingston Public Hospital and the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Colleen Wright; and Director of Nursing Services for the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Elise Fairweather Blackwood. They attended the handover ceremony for five incubators and five phototherapy devices donated to the hospital by the United Kingdom-based charity, Rejuvenate Jamaica Hospitals. The ceremony was held on February 22 at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital’s North Street address in Kingston. The equipment, five incubators and five phototherapy devices, were handed over during a ceremony held on February 22, at the hospital’s North Street address in Kingston. The Victoria Jubilee Hospital has received medical equipment valued at US$6,700 from United Kingdom-based charity, Rejuvenate Jamaica Hospitals, to improve its neonatal services.center_img Story Highlights “I know that your donation will assist in enhancing the healthcare of our clients. At this hospital we provide gynaecological care, as well as maternity care. We know from time to time babies are going to be born that need to be placed in the incubators. We are grateful for the donation and we will use it as prescribed,” Ms. Wright said.Senior Medical Officer at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Dr. Rishi Chand, said the hospital’s services are in great demand, noting that an average of 700 babies are delivered each month.He expressed appreciation for the equipment, noting that it “is going to help us manage our patients”.Dr. Chand added that the Programme for the Reduction of Maternal and Child Mortality (PROMAC) which is to come on stream shortly, will further assist in expanding the hospital’s capacity.Representative of Rejuvenate Jamaica Hospitals, Joan Lindsay, said the charity remains committed to improving the services of the island’s public health facilities.“We have been fundraising for the past five years. We are grateful for the public that freely give and donate to the cause. It is because of them that we are able to equip the hospital with these incubators. Children are our future, and so we were inspired to try to get these equipment,” she said.Rejuvenate Jamaica Hospitals’ mandate is to improve public health facilities across the island.last_img read more