Round 7: Pacquiao asserts offensive game on Vargas

first_imgPacquiao connected with a jab near the corner with less than a minute remaining.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Manny Pacquiao, right, of the Philippines, hits Jessie Vargas during their WBO welterweight title boxing match, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)Manny Pacquiao was the one to put the pressure on the champion Vargas with multiple lunging combos in the middle of the ring.Vargas tried to hurt Pacquiao’s body but his defense has fallen off as he is now smack in the middle of the Filipino’s punching range.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise EDITORS’ PICK Round 6: Vargas uses length to put pressure on Pacquiao Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway We are young MOST READlast_img read more

Valdez, BOC set up V-League finals date with Pocari

first_imgSmart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports “Alam naman natin ang Bali Pure hindi bibigay yan, and gumanda talaga laro nila,” said Transformers head coach Sherwin Meneses after giving up the third and fourth sets to the Water Defenders.Meneses added their stable fifth set could be credited to the leadership of team captain Alyssa Valdez who served as Meneses’ coaching extension on the court.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“Yung breaks napunta sa amin and lamang kami kasi may Alyssa kami kasi may coach kami sa loob, yun  lamang namin.”BOC held an early 7-2 lead at the start of the fifth when Kanjana Kuthaisong and Valdez exchanged kills to establish the Transformers’ momentum en route to Mabbayad’s clincher. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Ravena, Ateneo hope to continue dream run Kuthaisong would also lead the Transformers in scoring with 20 points while Valdez added 16.Rose Vargas and Mabbayad also finished in double digits with 13 and 10 points, respectively.Katherine Morrell would carry the offensive load for Bali Pure as she finished with 24 points while Amy Ahomiro added 10.ADVERTISEMENT FILE – Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBureau of Customs clung on to its finals dreams and upended Bali Pure in five sets, 25-21, 25-16, 24-26, 8-25, 15-8, in the do-or-die game in the semifinals of the Shakey’s V-League Reinforced Conference Wednesday at Philsports Arena.Lillet Mabbayad came through in the clutch for the Transformers, who will now face Pocari Sweat in the finals come Saturday.ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise PH among economies most vulnerable to viruscenter_img We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modeslast_img read more

Three PH clubs in Asian tilt next year?

first_imgTaiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Dimakiling, Nouri shock Foreign GMs as Pinoy bets start strongly in Subic int’l tourney Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports The Philippines could have three clubs playing in Asian Football Confederation competitions next year, following the AFC’s decision to allot one slot to the country in the AFC Champions League preliminary round.Reigning United Football League champion Global FC will vie in the top club competition—the AFC Champions League—in the continent starting in January, while Ceres-La Salle will once again compete in the AFC Cup group stage.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus MOST READ Senators to proceed with review of VFA View comments Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young Global won’t have the luxury of time to prepare as it starts its bid against Singapore side Tampines Rovers on Jan. 24 at Rizal Memorial Stadium. The winner of the clash will travel to Australia for a Jan. 31 knockout match with A-League side Brisbane Roar. Chinese giants Shanghai Shenhua await the survivor of the game in Brisbane on Feb. 7 with the winner moving on to the main draw of the Champions League.Wanted: Foreign playersPalami said the club is still in the process of acquiring foreign players, as the likes of Omid Nazari, Milan Nikolic and Ivan Petrovic left Global after their championship winning season last October.If Global ends up playing in the second-tier competition, the AFC Cup, the Filipino side will be in Group F alongside Malaysian champion Johor Darul Tazim, Magwe of Myanmar and the winner between Boeung Ket Angkor of Cambodia and Lao Toyota of Laos in a playoff.Ceres landed in Group H with Vietnam league champ Ha Noi T and T, Felda United of Malaysia and Tampines Rovers of Singapore. If Tampines makes the Champions League main draw, Geylang International will take its place in the group.ADVERTISEMENT A third Philippine club—the Loyola Meralco Sparks—could make the AFC Cup, if Global qualifies for the main draw of the Champions League, where some of the biggest clubs in Australia, Japan, China, South Korea and the United Arab Emirates see action.The Sparks finished third in the UFL league competition this year.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliHonor“It’s a huge honor and a responsibility at the same time being the pioneering Philippine club in the Champions’ League,” said Global chief executive Dan Palami, who is also manager of the national men’s football team.“It’s going to be a tough journey since we’ll have to win three games before reaching the group stages. But I’m happy for Philippine football. Having a Philippine club in the Champions League is a testament to the growth and development of the sport in the country.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exerciselast_img read more

Fire, more than logging, drives Amazon forest degradation, study finds

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists have monitored deforestation for several decades using both on-the-ground and remote methods. Although clear-cut logging continues in earnest across the Amazon, deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon are lower than in the early 2000s. Degradation, on the other hand, remains a growing issue and historically has received less attention than forest loss.Measuring irregular losses in Amazon forest carbon stock is difficult. Selective logging targets valuable hardwood tree species such as ironwood and mahogany and typically removes several trees per hectare. Similarly, understory fires – caused by agricultural development, flammable debris leftover from logging, or careless disposal of cigarettes – may leave canopy foliage intact despite a charred underbelly. Modern-day satellite images cannot penetrate the forest canopy to record potential damage below, and isolated instances of degradation may not be visible at the 30-meter or higher resolution of standard satellite imagery. Surveillance by foot can more clearly identify degraded forests but is unfeasible for areas larger than a few hectares (or acres).In the last few decades, fortunately, a groundbreaking tool has managed to achieve both the fine resolution of ground inventory and the broad coverage of satellite data.LiDAR provides high-resolution, three-dimensional depictions of forestLight Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a method of remote sensing that uses light waves to measure distances to a target (in this case the Earth’s surface and vegetation) from a transmitter. Lasers are fired, typically from an airplane, at up to 150,000 pulses per second and bounce back to a highly acute sensor located near the source of the lasers. The distance to the target is calculated from how long it takes for the lasers to return, and different spectrums of light can be fired in order to survey different materials or structural properties. Combining the calculated distances travelled by individual lasers, each to a different point of the target, with a highly precise GPS system results in an impressively accurate three-dimensional representation of the target structure.An airborne LiDAR system includes a GPS to provide the plane’s position, an Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) to record the aircraft’s altitude, and a laser that scans back and forth across the terrain below. The laser sends many thousands of light pulses toward Earth that bounce back to the scanner. The return time of the pulses represents the distances from the known height of the plane to the surfaces below. The distance data are used to generate information about the shape and structure of the area’s vegetation. Image by University of Texas Coastal Studies Group.The incorporation of LiDAR data allowed the study’s researchers to explore dimensions of forest loss that previously were hard to quantify. “With LiDAR, we are able to characterize the fine-scale changes in carbon density associated with degradation,” Rappaport said. “[Carbon losses from degradation] have been trickier to characterize than carbon losses from deforestation, which are less subtle in nature.”The high-resolution data LiDAR produces enable scientists to assess the variability in canopy height, a metric of forest ecological stability. Rappaport and her co-authors determined that degradation due to fire and logging resulted in persistent changes in forest canopy structure, habitat that is critical to arboreal organisms such as saki monkeys in Peru.LiDAR data’s remarkable precision does come at a cost that is prohibitively high for most research teams. Since the technology was only recently developed, historic LiDAR data are not available, so change over a long time series cannot be observed.Historic satellite data, such as from the Landsat series, come in great use. The Landsat satellites have been operating continuously for 46 years, and the two currently orbiting satellites, 7 and 8, in combination record freely available images of almost the entire globe in an eight-day cycle. Although the images do not have the spatial resolution of LiDAR [each Landsat pixel is 30 meters (98 feet) across], Landsat complements LiDAR with resolution across time.Intact rainforest canopy in the Amazon Image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayLiDAR and satellite imagery can record forest structure across space and time, but determining a ratio of carbon per tree or hectare requires on-the-ground assessment of stored carbon. The researchers used tree species and size data from ground-based carbon inventories to estimate the amount of carbon the trees sequester. In combination, the three methods can be very powerful for measuring forest carbon stocks.“Our work to combine forest inventory measurements, airborne LiDAR, and Landsat time series serves as a blueprint for the synergistic use of multiple datasets to estimate carbon emissions from forest degradation,“ Rappaport said.Using this multifaceted approach, Rappaport and her colleagues estimated the loss of carbon due to forest degradation and the relative contributions by logging and fire. Their estimates of carbon loss due to fire were about three times higher than such estimates derived from field experiments or forest inventories in previous studies. Additionally, forests that experienced three or more recurrent fire events in 15 years or less were left with an average of 10 percent of the carbon stock found in the original forest stand.The researchers conclude that fire has the potential to release more carbon stocks than either selective logging or clear-cutting. And conditions may only get worse for the Amazon: projections of more frequent and intense droughts suggest hotter, bigger fires.Map of degraded and intact forest stands in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, where researchers from University of Maryland and NASA recorded forest degradation from fire and logging via ground-based, satellite and LiDAR data. Forest appears green, deforested areas appear pink, and circles indicate the center of forest stands with LiDAR coverage (see key for color code; U—undisturbed; L—logged; LB—logged and burned; B—burned). Figure from Rappaport et al. (2018). Quantifying long-term changes in carbon stocks and forest structure from Amazon forest degradation. Environmental Research Letters, 13.Accurate carbon estimates can revise outdated baselinesAlthough high-resolution data from sources such as LiDAR can reveal somber findings, acquiring an accurate depiction of the full amount of carbon lost due to both deforestation and degradation is critical to understanding – and preventing – anthropogenic disturbance of forests.Rappaport recommends that their findings be used to update guidelines for monitoring carbon stocks present within intact and degraded forests, a key requirement for countries seeking performance-based payments from reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) programs.“By combining the emissions factors published in this study with [forest cover change] data from satellite observations, we will be able to verify the long-term role that Amazon forest degradation plays within regional carbon cycling,” she said. Rappaport added that they could also “establish emissions baselines necessary for supporting the implementation of REDD+.”Additionally, because their high-resolution methods revealed that forest carbon stocks vary by about two orders of magnitude, the authors recommend multiple classes of degraded forest under the REDD+ framework.Such baselines and classifications are critical to determining the readiness of a nation to begin a REDD+ program and to monitoring the amount of carbon stock retained. The United Nations and World Bank fund two of the most prominent REDD+ programs, and partner countries, including every Amazonian nation but Brazil and Venezuela, must regularly monitor and report forest carbon stocks. If the monitoring process does not capture the full amount of carbon lost due to forest degradation, participating nations may be given more credit than is deserved.A refined understanding of the drivers of forest degradation can also refocus preventative efforts. The World Bank and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) quickly deployed fire control projects in the aftermath of the massive El Niño drought across the Amazon in 1998. With the provision of additional mapping of forest damage due to fires, and with organizations such as Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research taking note, widespread preventative initiatives could be revitalized.Although some international policy currently lags behind cutting-edge forest monitoring capabilities, it would not be the first time that remote sensing data has induced policy change.Looking over the Amazon forest canopy at dawn. Image by Brazilian things, CC 4.0“[Brazil]’s advanced satellite-based monitoring system was a central agent in spurring increased law enforcement and responsive action against forest clearing,” Rappaport said. More widespread LiDAR coverage throughout the Amazon is on the horizon, and continued surveillance will likely stir up more attention, and policy change, in response to forest degradation and the serious impact of anthropogenic fires. “Remote sensing is uniquely poised to help drive and enforce policy change to stem deforestation and degradation.”CitationRappaport, D, I., Morton, D. C., Longo, M., Keller, M., Nara dos-Santos, M. (2018). Quantifying long-term changes in carbon stocks and forest structure from Amazon forest degradation. Environmental Research Letters, 13.  https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aac331FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Amazon, Amazon Rainforest, Conservation Solutions, data, Forests, LiDAR, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Redd, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Sensors, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildtech center_img Although deforestation (left) is absolute and uniform, forest degradation (right) tends to be more irregular and patchy. Its effects on the forest interior are often undetectable from satellite imagery. Images by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.   Forest degradation has historically been overlooked in accounting and monitoring carbon stocks.A recent study combined ground-based inventory, satellite and LiDAR data to record the loss of carbon due to forest degradation in areas exposed to logging, fire damage, or both, in the arc of deforestation of the southeastern Amazon.The study revealed that fire damage causes greater losses than logging, and fire-damaged forests recovered more slowly than logged forests.Accurate depictions of both deforestation and degradation are necessary to establish emissions baselines used to inform programs to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). The shrieking rip of a chainsaw and the muffled roar of fire: both of these sounds are associated with extensive destruction of Amazon rainforest. But is logging or human-caused fire a larger issue for the fate of the Amazon? And when such activities culminate in a partially degraded forest – rather than complete deforestation – is there much cause for alarm?A recent study published in Environmental Research Letters explored these questions. Using a combination of ground-based, satellite and LiDAR data, scientists from the University of Maryland and NASA recorded the loss of carbon due to forest degradation in areas exposed to logging, fire damage, or both, in 20,000 square kilometers (7,722 square miles) of the southeast Amazon’s “arc of deforestation,” a crescent-shaped strip of intensive forest conversion along the southern and eastern edges of the forest.The Amazon arc of deforestation stretches across the southern and eastern edges of the forest and is rapidly expanding into the forest’s core. Data in Global Forest Watch from Hansen et al (2013) and Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research (INPE) PRODES project.The researchers found that degraded forest stands contained an average of 45.1 percent of the amount of carbon stored in intact forest stands. They compared the impacts of fire and logging, the two most prominent drivers of loss of forest carbon stocks. Fires not only resulted in higher loss of stored carbon than logging, but fire-damaged forests also recovered more slowly than logged forests. Forests subjected to fire remained more impacted after 15 years than forests subjected to logging after the same duration, and neither type of forest recovered to pre-disturbance carbon density.“We combined [forest inventory, satellite and LiDAR data] within a modeling framework to predict how losses and recovery rates of carbon stocks/forest structure are driven by differences in the type, intensity, and frequency of human degradation,“ said the study’s lead author Danielle Rappaport, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland. “By providing the first comprehensive set of emissions factors for Amazon forest degradation, this work aims to help support the formal integration of degradation within carbon accounting systems, which have generally excluded degradation all together.”Forest degradation discrete, dangerousDegradation, unlike deforestation, is not absolute. Instead of a complete elimination of forest from the land, degradation is a more subtle process through which patches of forest, or even just individual trees, are lost. But the loss is still significant: 50,815 square kilometers (19,620 square miles) of forest in the Brazilian Amazon was degraded between 2000 and 2010, and emissions from degradation in the Amazon may be higher than those from deforestation. Additionally, the decreased structural complexity of degraded forests cannot support as much biodiversity as primary, undamaged forest.last_img read more

African wood industry: 10,000 micro-businesses need support for sustainable trade

first_imgA survey of 10,000 east and west African wood processing micro-businesses found that sourcing legal materials and legal compliance to be key difficulties in maintaining environmentally-ethical and legal business practices.The micro-businesses, connected and represented by a network of 21 wood industry associations, found a widespread need for more support and access to resources.The two reports from the survey results were released on Oct. 22 by the Global Timber Forum, a Washington, DC non-profit that works to build the capacity of forest and wood-based industry associations.The findings were released just ahead of Forest Legality Week, an annual gathering that draws together global forestry leaders and experts in Washington, D.C. Wood processing micro-businesses in several east, central and west African countries say they have a widespread need for more support and access to resources. Their rallying call for help is reflected in the results of a survey run by the  Global Timber Forum (GTF), a London-based non-profit that works to build the capacity of forest and wood-based industry associations for responsible trade. Information gathered through 21 wood-industry associations with a total membership of nearly 10,000 micro-businesses in several African countries led to two reports.  The reports focus on the relationship between micro-businesses and business associations in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Liberia and Mozambique. The findings come just ahead of the second annual Forest Legality Week  in Washington, D.C., where experts from around the world will discuss a variety of forestry-related sustainability issues. Results were formed from a series of anonymized surveys conducted with multiple associations from each country.GTF’s director of policy and external affairs, Andrew Escott, said in an interview that the undertaking revealed ways to interact with micro-businesses at scale. The research illustrates the barriers and challenges to establishing sustainable timber harvests with these small operations. According to Escott, the nature of these operations can vary wildly. Both surveys used parameters of 10 or fewer employees to define a typical micro-business, which Escott further defined as often being a family business typically run by father-son teams. They can include small logging companies, sawmills, charcoal, and small skilled production companies — joinery and furniture — which usually serve the local market. Escott said that many of the companies at this small size lack any legal standing — they are often unregistered and unlicensed, and many operate by cash. That doesn’t diminish their importance, though.“It is these guys [whom] anyone with an interest in preserving forests needs to reach,” Escott said. “Their existing links with associations, identified in this research, makes this a great place to start.” However, one of the problems with looking to associations for consistent sustainability practices is that they do not have a place at the table with governments and NGOs to discuss problems and offer solutions. In addition to access, Escott said that a lack of resources and training contributes to poor practices. One common example is a lack of access to technical advice for association members. The first GTF survey noted that associations have an average number of 1.9 full time senior management and administrative staff members — with the smallest association having just one and the largest having 3.5. The second survey showed a higher average of 4 staff members, but also accounted for more positions including technical specialists, accountants, drivers and janitorial staff. Only three associations from the first survey said they have staff dedicated to taking technical questions. None were identified in the second survey.A necklace made from mpingo and another local hardwood. Photo by Sophie Tremblay for Mongabay.The reports also noted a list of constraints and key challenges for associations. They include a lack of resources and technical skills to support development of membership and active membership, and tools to support membership facing forest legality system changes. In addition, members need to understand the export market requirements and have access to market data. Without that, their ability to lobby domestically and internationally is limited. Not enough funding to support and grow membership is also an issue.Limited access to legal wood supplies and resources, and a wider global market that’s increasingly demanding sustainable practices, are also problematic for the micro-businesses. Survey respondents said there isn’t enough funding to gain access to more profitable markets, among other related issues.Some of those include lackluster performance in expertise, designs, and product development. Association members said they feel that their organizations don’t provide enough training opportunities in equipment maintenance, skills in marketing and production of basic products, research capabilities, and a focus on conservation. The report noted that, “Historically, associations have paid little attention to the importance of viable business systems, regular training and capacity building of their human resource capital.” The challenges for these associations is to implement more sustainable best practices and technologies that support harvesting a variety of wood species. None of the associations could not be reached by time of publication.“When [associations] talked about their challenges they all said they want to be able to provide a better frame for legality,” GTF’s Escott said. “What were seeing is a low representation from those advocating for the smallest operators. We don’t want these changes to put these people out completely.”Escott added that government-led sustainable harvesting practices often push micro- and small business operators into illegal timbering, and onto shaky legal ground. “Many of the changes going on in these countries are requiring increased levels of documentation and the use of technology— all good things,” Escott said. “But they need to be adapted so micro-businesses can comply, the smallest usually being the least equipped to make changes.”A lack of funding for nearly every service association is a key issue and what is most needed is a source of third party funds, Escott said. He added that the more businesses are in need of the association, the less there is to give. So additional funds will likely kickstart a cyclical process of seeking help that provides more resources, training and long-term capital which, in turn, provides associations with more resources as well.“For [businesses] an association can be the gateway to accessing funding, building their capacity and to having a voice in the larger governmental processes that are going on around them. The association is a path to legitimacy and sustainability and a potential window on the wider world that impacts on what they do today and in the future.”Forest Legality Week runs on the week of 23 Oct. – 25 Oct. and will feature a range of speakers from the World Resources Institute, Observatoire de la Gouvernance Forestiere (OGF), and Forestry Commission Ghana among many universities and other NGOs.Banner image: A woodcarver makes a carving of a rhinoceros on the outskirts of Lunga Lunga, a town on the border between Kenya and Tanzania. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay. Forests, Rainforests, Supply Chain, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Tropical hardwoods Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Mongabay investigative series helps confirm global insect decline

first_imgIn a newly published four-part series, Mongabay takes a deep dive into the science behind the so-called “Insect Apocalypse,” recently reported in the mainstream media.To create the series, Mongabay interviewed 24 entomologists and other scientists on six continents and working in 12 nations, producing what is possibly the most in-depth reporting published to date by any news media outlet on the looming insect abundance crisis.While major peer-reviewed studies are few (with evidence resting primarily so far on findings in Germany and Puerto Rico), there is near consensus among the two dozen researchers surveyed: Insects are likely in serious global decline.The series is in four parts: an introduction and critical review of existing peer-reviewed data; a look at temperate insect declines; a survey of tropical declines; and solutions to the problem. Researchers agree: Conserving insects — imperative to preserving the world’s ecosystem services — is vital to humanity. Read the entire series by Mongabay senior contributor Jeremy Hance hereAs night falls, numerous insects still fly to the artificial lights of homes in the Kenyan bush. But entomologist Dino Joseph Martins vividly recalls a time when the numbers swarming nightly above his outdoor table were staggering.“You would struggle … to eat your supper because you would have endless beetles and [flying] things falling in your … soup,” he recalls. Today, “that happens far less,” making outdoor dining more pleasant, but far more disquieting.Now Mongabay, in an exclusive four-part series, “The Great Insect Dying,” takes a deep dive into the so-called “Insect Apocalypse.” Interviews with 24 researchers on six continents, and working in 12 nations, are at the heart of the report — likely the most in-depth published on the looming insect abundance crisis by any news media outlet to date.Answers, so far, rest on the hard evidence found in a mere handful of studies, and on the anecdotal, though expert, observations by scientists. Despite limited peer-reviewed research, the scientists interviewed are in near consensus, agreeing that insects are very likely in significant decline globally.Part One of the series, an introduction to the issue, looks at the hard evidence. First news of a possible “Insect Apocalypse” broke in 2017 with groundbreaking research in temperate Europe, where researchers were stunned to learn that flying insect abundance fell by 75 percent in just 27 years in Germany’s nature reserves.Then, in 2018, tropical researchers reported that total arthropod biomass had plunged by 10 to 60 times in just 40 years in a Puerto Rican rainforest (arthropods include insects, arachnids and similar invertebrates).The rush to find evidence was on: A recent, but controversial, meta-study points to a serious decline, with insect abundance possibly falling at a rate of 2.5 percent annually. While most entomologists debate this finding, the majority interviewed believe a large-scale decline is underway.The big question: how bad is it?Ant drama unfolding on the ground beneath one of the caterpillar rearing barns run by Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs’ team of parataxonomists in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. Shortly after this photo was taken, the small ants brought the larger one down into their colony. Image by Timothy Treuer.Part Two of the series looks at declines in the temperate zones of Europe and North America, regions where we know the most about insects, but have little data on abundance trends.However, as each new data point is added to the picture, the news isn’t good: In a Scottish study, moth abundance dropped by 46 percent in just 25 years; in the Netherlands, an 84 percent decline in butterflies was detected between 1890 and 2017. Still-unpublished U.S. research in Ohio may tell a similar story, with butterflies there declining by about 2 percent per year.Part Three offers a survey of the tropics, where insects have the greatest diversity of any animal group on Earth. But studies are scant there, with the Puerto Rico research and a Mexico study providing the only major data points on abundance.Tropical researchers have, however, anecdotally observed big declines, and say they expect large-scale population decreases driven by climate change, wholesale habitat loss and deforestation (especially due to the meteoric growth of industrial agribusiness in the tropics), along with excessive pesticide use.This doesn’t mean all insect groups in every region are, or will be, in free fall. Declines will likely be uneven and family-specific. Some insects may even benefit, especially those able to live in highly degraded habitats — but most won’t, say the experts. Survey projects like the Arthropod Initiative and the Global Malaise Trap Program could soon begin offering much-needed data on tropical insect trends.In Part Four, the researchers offer solutions. Despite the lack of data, they say, we know enough already to start taking aggressive global action to save insects — and ourselves — now.last_img read more