Connecticut Apportionment and Market-Based Sourcing Changes Addressed, Sourcing Rules Established

first_imgThe Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) has issued a special notice that addresses legislative changes to the apportionment of income by taxpayers computing:corporation business tax (CBT) liability, effective for income years beginning on or after January 1, 2016; andpersonal income tax liability, effective for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2017.The notice contains procedures intended to help taxpayers source their receipts under the market-based sourcing rules. In addition, examples illustrate the application of the sourcing rules.Sales FactorThe legislation replaced the three-factor apportionment formula consisting of property, payroll, and sales factors with a formula based solely on the sales factor. In addition, the legislation adopted market-based sourcing rules for receipts from transactions involving services and intangible property. Receipts from the sale of certain property must be excluded from both the numerator and denominator of the sales factor if the property is not held by taxpayers primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of the taxpayer’s trade or business.Sourcing ProceduresUnder market-based sourcing, receipts from the sale of services and the rental, lease or license of intangible property must be sourced to Connecticut if, and to the extent, a business or individual customer uses the services or intangible property in the state.In general, use occurs at the location(s) where the taxpayer’s business or individual customer either directly or indirectly receives value from the service or intangible property. Taxpayers must follow procedures to identify where a customer receives value from a service or intangible property. The procedures, which depend on the  facts and circumstances of the transaction, include:sourcing receipts based on the location of the customer’s billing address;the location indicated in the contract between the taxpayer and customer or the taxpayer’s books and records; orthe location where the customer placed the order for a service.The sourcing rules for determining the location where a business customer uses intangible property also distinguish between marketing intangibles, non-marketing and manufacturing intangibles, and mixed intangibles. If the location at which a customer uses a service or intangible property cannot be determined by the taxpayer after making reasonable inquiries, the taxpayer may reasonably approximate the location where the service or property is used. Finally, a taxpayer may petition the DRS for permission to source its receipts on an alternative basis, if, after a diligent effort to apply the procedures outlined in the notice, a taxpayer still cannot determine the proper sourcing of its receipts.Taxpayers Required to Use Market-Based SourcingThe apportionment and sourcing rule changes apply to taxpayers, including manufacturers, that are doing business in, or have economic nexus in and outside, Connecticut. CBT taxpayers engaged in certain activities, including air carriers, broadcasters, securities brokerages, and financial service companies, must continue to use industry specific apportionment and sourcing rules.Special Notice 2017(1), Connecticut Department of Revenue Services, April 17, 2017, ¶401-824Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.Need to learn more about market-based sourcing? Check out CCH CPELinklast_img read more

Florida Announces 2019 Motor Fuel Tax Rates

first_imgFor calendar year 2019, Florida state motor fuel (gasoline) and diesel fuel tax rates will increase while the aviation fuel tax rate will remain at its current rate.Motor Fuel Tax RateEffective January 1, 2019, the state motor fuel tax rate is increased to 18.1 cents per gallon (formerly, 17.7 cents). The local option rate varies by county and the ninth cent will remain the same. The State Comprehensive Enhanced Transportation System (SCETS) rate will increase to 7.8 cents per gallon (formerly, 7.6 cents). The inspection fee on motor fuel will remain 0.125 cents per gallon.Minimum Local Option Tax on Motor Fuel Collected at Fuel TerminalsIn addition to the 18.1 cents per gallon state fuel tax collected at the loading rack, terminal suppliers must collect a minimum local option fuel tax. The local option fuel tax must be collected at the following rates on each gallon of motor fuel sold to licensed wholesalers:– 13.8 cents per gallon; and– an inspection fee of .125 cents per gallon.Total fuel taxes collected by terminal suppliers on sales of motor fuel to licensed wholesalers is 32.025 cents per gallon.Diesel Fuel Tax RateAlso effective January 1, 2019, the state diesel fuel tax rate will increase to 18.1 cents per gallon (formerly, 17.7 cents). The county tax rate (ninth cent, SCETS, and local option tax rates) on diesel fuel will increase to 14.8 cents per gallon statewide (formerly, 14.6 cents). The total state and county rates on diesel fuel will increase to 32.9 cents per gallon statewide (formerly, 32.3 cents).Aviation Fuel Tax RateThe aviation fuel tax rate will remain at 6.9 cents per gallon until June 30, 2019. Effective July 1, 2019, the aviation fuel tax rate will decrease to 4.27 cents per gallon (formerly, 6.9 cents).Tax Information Publication, No. 18B05-03, Florida Department of Revenue, November 28, 2018, ¶206-406Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Scaling Business Intelligence with Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series (code-named “Westmere”)

first_imgBy how much a drop-in CPU upgrade can boost your server app performance? By 1.2x,… 1.4x? Please find below a report how even astonishing 1.64x can be possible.Recently, Intel has launched the Xeon® Processor 5600 Series (formerly known as “Westmere”). The new CPU is an upgrade for the 5500 Series with two remarkable improvements:• 50% more cores in a single CPU: six instead of four• Higher frequency: 3.33 GHz instead of 2.93 GHzThese and many other enhancements (like larger last level cache and fast encryption/decryption instructions) boosted many well known benchmarks.There is an exceptional result I am especially proud of: Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series provided up to 1.64x performance gain for the SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer, accelerated version (including SAP NetWeaver BW Accelerator). This software combines intuitive information search and exploration functionality with the high performance and scalability of in-memory analytics. If you want to feel this intuitiveness and breathtaking speed even on tremendous data volumes, please visit http://microfinance.sap.com/, it takes only a minute to register.SAP and Intel have collaborated for years to deliver SAP NetWeaver BW Accelerator (backend for the accelerated version of SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer) as an extraordinary business intelligence appliance, optimizing and tuning it to utilize the advantages of Intel architecture. As a result, our customers will benefit from almost perfect scaling with the new CPU upgrade. Theoretically, the improvement one could hope for is about (6/4)x(3.33/2.93)=1.70x (through the increased core count and increased frequency). That means an amazing scaling efficiency of 96% is achieved!For more details please see the attached solution brief “SAP BusinessObjects* Explorer, Accelerated Version, and SAP NetWeaver* Business Warehouse Accelerator on the Intel ® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series”. If you have questions, let me know (send me a private message or post a comment here), I will be happy to answer.Enjoy your new Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series!last_img read more

Tips to Protecting Your Mobile Devices While Travelling on Vacation

first_imgMobile devices are important in our daily lives, but become outright treasured companions when we travel.  Losing your device while away from home is frustrating and can define a trip as memorably horrible.  For my friends and colleagues who will be enjoying the summer months travelling about with their cherished smartphones and tablets, here are a few tips to keeping them secure.  Handle your device safely.  Phones and tablets are easy targets for thieves.  Additionally, they are easily left behind or forgotten.  Just like your wallet or passport, don’t leave your devices alone or visible to others.  Leaving an expensive device visible in a parked car, restaurant table, or in a hotel room unattended is just asking for troubleBackup your data.  Before you leave, be sure to back-up your contacts and data.  In the event the device is lost, stolen, or dropped in the pool, being able to quickly restore a new device is key to reducing stress and returning to your fun activities.  Many backup services and solutions are availableLock the device.  Enable screen passwords.  It may be an annoyance to you, but it is very problematic to someone who is trying to steal your information.  Don’t make it easy for the criminals to victimize youIf lost, help get it back.  Many good natured people find lost phones, but are unable to easily return the device.  Adding contact information on the lock-screen can expedite the return of your precious phone or tablet.  Several devices and software enable this handy function.  But don’t list the phone number of the device itself, instead list a friend or an email account you can easily checkIf missing, track it.  Install tracking solutions to be able to both beacon as well as geo-track the device.  When instructed, a beacon function will turn on the device, set it to maximum volume and then sound an audible alarm.  A great feature if the device is within earshot.  Geo-tracking will use internal GPS functions of the device to show where it is on a map.  The problem when you lose something is it might be under the seat of the car right next to you or in the terminal of the airport miles awayIf stolen, nuke it.  Worst case, your device has been pilfered by a malicious person and may be used to explore your life and attack your finances.  It is better to limit the damage to only replacing a phone or tablet.  Sending a ‘poison pill’ to remotely destroy all your data will leave the thief with a blank device, unable to cause further harmProtect it from Malware.  Travelling is not the best time to be affected by malware.  Be sure to have robust anti-virus running on the system.  Many products also bundle device tracking (beacon and geo-track) and remote data destruction capabilities (poison pill)8. Use phones as lifelines to friends and family.  In addition to sharing and basking in the glory of your awesome vacation or adventure, phones can let those who you love know where you are and that you are safe.  It can also inform of delays, vehicle breakdowns, detours, and changes in plans.  Smartphones and tables can act as personal safety assistants by providing maps to avoid getting lost (unless that is what you want), translate conversations in local languages, and change reservations if safety becomes a concern.  Keep your devices safe by letting them keep you safe.last_img read more

You don’t want vendor lock-in: 5 rules for a real world solution

first_imgIn my last blog post I pointed out you can never actually avoid vendor or technology lock-in. This is particularly applicable to the main cloud orchestration tool you use. You have to choose one orchestrator and will want to stay with that choice for quite some time. So, making the right choice is key.As long as clear standards have not emerged you will have to make a choice regarding which technology you implement. Such technology can be provided by a vendor, meaning you trust the vendor, or come from a consortium building open source tools. In that case you are betting that consortium will be a winner moving forward.For some technologies, there are two ways of looking at standards. The orchestration tool is actually an interesting one from that perspective. On the one hand you have the orchestrator itself allowing you to provision, de-provision and run services. On the other you have the configurator, which will explain to the orchestrator what needs to be done for each service. The orchestrator might be proprietary, but if you have a standardized configuration “language”, you are able to shift from one orchestrator to another if you wish to. To stick to my example, you have TOSCA for example standardizing the specification of service automation.Since you can’t ever be fully sure, it’s critical right from the initial choice to look at how the tools you use can interact with the external world. This will allow you down the road to integrate with other environments if your original choice does not turn out. Here are five pragmatic things you better check out early.1. Support of heterogeneous environments (hardware, operating systems and hypervisors)This one is particularly applicable if you choose an integrated cloud environment but should be checked in other situations also.Which server, storage and networking infrastructures are supported by the environment you choose? How easy is it to add infrastructure from a different type? Not only does this allow you to include some of your existing infrastructure in your cloud, but it leaves you the freedom to make alternative choices moving forward.Most applications today are built either on Windows or Linux, but some still use a variety of UNIX type operating systems or even private ones. What OS is used by the applications you are planning to move to the cloud and are those supported by your environment? This is a key question to evaluate.The third element to this step is the hypervisor. Today the majority of the market uses VMWare’s products. But we slowly see a shift to other hypervisors such as Hyper-V and KVM. Costs and technology factors play a role here. Don’t limit yourself to one hypervisor, but make sure your environment supports multiple, giving you the possibility to choose what is best for you. Even if your existing operational systems run on VMWare, maybe you want to use KVM for the development of new applications. Some development tools currently in the market actually allow you to automate the deployment of applications on multiple cloud environments. This allows you, for example, to use KVM for development and most of testing while you run VMWare in production, hence reducing license costs.2. The availability of APIsHow can I interact with the chosen technology? Can I trigger actions from other applications or portals without requiring manual intervention? What do the application programming interfaces (APIs) allow me to do? How well are they documented? How easy are they to set up and use? These questions are fundamental in ensuring the technology is open and gives me the flexibility to evolve as my needs change. A couple API standards are emerging (AWS and OpenStack), but they only address IaaS functionality at the moment. You’ll probably need more.Look at APIs from two ways: incoming and outgoing APIs. Can an external environment trigger an action using the technology and can the technology initiate an action that needs to be taken by an external environment? Here are a couple specific areas to look at:Can I perform all functions available in the portal through programmatic interactions?Do I have the possibility to integrate an external identification/access management environment?Can I integrate with my existing LDAP/Active Directory environment and use its information?Can I use an external approval environment to approve for example the provisioning by a user of a service?Can I integrate an external service in my catalog (we’ll talk more on that a little further in this blog post)This is a non-exhaustive list. Make sure you have yours prior making a choice.3. Template DesignsOrchestration uses templates to define what action to take. Those are typically designed using graphical user interfaces. Obviously, in case you decide to change orchestration tools, the last thing you want is to have to redesign the thousands of workflows or templates you designed. Hence the fact standards are emerging. The most documented one at the moment is TOSCA as I already mentioned. However, we are still in the early days, so we cannot be sure this is going to be it. So, make sure the technology you choose is clearly intended to support a standard. Support of TOSCA is a good proof point.4. Configuring external servicesI often highlight intermediation, aggregation and bursting in this blog. All three require a programmatic interaction with external systems. This implies interactions between the two environments. We already talked about the APIs, their documentation and what they would do. But there is another aspect to look at and this is how the external service can be integrated.Let me give an example. You want to integrate Salesforce.com in your catalog, allowing your users to request access to your CRM environment on Salesforce.com. You will need to describe the service in your catalog, define which users can request access and potentially identify an approval process and a price or charge back for the service. But then, you will need to make sure that, when a user places the request, this request is actually transmitted to Salesforce.com. You will define an orchestration template that will trigger the transfer of the request and check whether it actually succeeded or not. But then you will have to describe how Salesforce is actually triggered. You will use some of Salesforce’s APIs to perform this task. Salesforce makes its functionality available through SOAP and RESTful APIs as described in the documentation.  You will connect an action in your orchestration template with an XML string that is transferred using the API technology chosen. For each action you plan to perform, you will have to configure such action. This is how you build the integration. But obviously you only have to do that once for each external service you plan to integrate.Before choosing a technology, make sure you understand how this can be done, and how effective and secure the communication is.5. CustomizationThe last element to review is the level of customization that is offered. Over the years your users have become familiar with a specific vocabulary and a way of doing things. Can you adapt the portal and the other functionality exposed to the user to something familiar to them? Also remember the questions I raised earlier. You may have a specific identification and access mechanism. Can that one be integrated? You may have your own approval process mechanism; can that one be replicated or integrated? And I could go on like this.Assess how well you can customize the environment to your specific needs.  But at the same time, check whether you can keep the customization when moving from one version of the software to the next one. You don’t want to have to redo everything when you upgrade your software. And in the cloud environment, newer versions of the software are regularly released.ConclusionWhen choosing a specific technology you are locking yourself in, whether you want to or not. Moving to a different one will be painful. So, make sure you are taking the right bet. Choose a technology that allows you not just to address today’s needs, but to grow with them as they evolve. Keep my five rules in mind as they will help you find an environment that can grow with you. And that is probably the most important. Frankly, most often companies change technology because the existing one becomes a bottleneck. Make sure you do not have to do that.- ChristianChristian Verstraete is the Chief Technologist Cloud at HP and has over 30 years in the industry, working with customers all over the world, linking business and technology.Read more of Christian’s blogs herelast_img read more

Move Beyond Gender Stereotypes

first_imgChanging the StereotypeI believe tech industry stereotypes are changing fast. And not because of the intervention of some external mandate or investment, but by the fast evolving nature of technology itself.Advances in the fields of big data processing, the Internet of Things, and data analytics are fundamentally transforming how and to what end technology is used. With an increasing emphasis on analytics, interpretation of trends and patterns in data, and integration of data insights into other fields, the kinds of skills needed to succeed in these new technical fields are evolving fast.I belong to a small professional group called the Women in Big Data Forum. One of our goals is to encourage and attract more female talent to the big data and analytics fields and help enhance diversity in these industries. However, our group is not limited to women solely in high tech—because the value of big data insights is not limited to technologists. Big data analysis is valuable to anyone with business acumen and the intuition to see trends, connections and relationships in data.And in many ways, women are better at that than men.In analytical fields, technical prowess is necessary, but only part of what’s needed to succeed. Women in Data Science: 4 Perspectives is a fascinating series of interviews with four data scientists commenting on current opportunities for women in big data analytics. In the article, the commentators stress, “the fields of data science and analytics are absolutely exploding with opportunity” for men and women alike, though women are finding a great deal of success in these fields because “they often bring a different intuition to the table.”This in part results from the fact that data analysis is an interdisciplinary field. According to Sarah Aerni, principal data scientist at Pivotal, “This field [data analytics] benefits from diversity in thinking. There is rarely only one way to approach a problem, and new ideas and input can only lead to more variety in approaches and potentially better outcomes.” In addition, the consumers of data science exist in every industry, and require people in data analytics to interact with a wide variety of businesses and individuals. “It is a field that values a variety of skills, deep technical abilities, hacking, storytelling, visualization and constant learning,” says Aerni. “This is something I value, and I think it encourages diverse backgrounds as well.”Diversity is Good BusinessDiversity in a technical workplace does come with benefits. The vast majority of innovations are developed not by lone geniuses but in a team environment, where groups of people work together to solve problems together. Within these teams, diversity of views, experience and expertise is a key to success because it broadens the pool of knowledge from which innovation springs.This is great news for both women and men, and for people with a variety of backgrounds and experience. As promising as the new top-down diversity programs and STEM initiatives are, there’s no reason to wait. Set aside the stereotypes and look for the opportunities that are opening right now.I encourage my colleagues in the tech sector to use their voices, their influence and their passion for innovation to look for opportunities to move beyond gender stereotypes and allow each individual to shine at whatever he or she is good at. After all, a more diverse and inclusive work force is a driver for innovation, as a broad set of experiences, perspectives, and backgrounds are crucial for the development of new ideas and creativity. Increasing the diversity of workers in the technology industry has become the issue of the moment. A steady stream of tech companies, from start-ups to giant corporations, are pledging to hire more women and minorities workers. By doing so, they may begin to eliminate some of the stereotypes that present barriers to entry to male-dominated fields like technology.These programs have taken on different forms, including:Apple’s $50 million donation to organizations that help women and minorities get into tech jobs;Intel’s $300 million initiative to increase the diversity of its workforce;Salesforce’s directive that all important meetings must include at least 30 percent women.These are laudable efforts, and in conjunction with improved STEM education and coding schools to help improve the skills of women and other under-represented groups, we can hope soon to see a tech workforce that looks more like the general population.Yet, I wonder if new advances and opportunities in technology haven’t already turned the old stereotypes on their ear, and brightened the prospects for women and minority workers at the cutting edge of the industry?last_img read more

Key Considerations for Building a Robust Data Strategy

first_imgMany business and IT leaders are focused on developing comprehensive data strategies that enable data-driven decision making. A 2016 IDG Enterprise survey found that 53% of companies were implementing or planning to implement data-driven projects within the next 12 months—specifically projects undertaken with the goal of generating greater value from existing data.1 With the growing importance of AI and advanced analytics today, it seems a safe assumption that this number has only increased over time.The concept of building a data strategy is such a hot topic that top-tier universities are creating executive-level courses on the subject,2 while industry observers are predicting that by 2020, 90% of Fortune 500 companies will have a chief data officer (CDO) or equivalent position.3Yet despite all of this momentum, the concept of a data strategy remains new to many organizations. They haven’t thought about it in the past, so it is uncharted territory, or maybe even an unknown-unknown. With that thought in mind, in this post, I will walk through some key considerations for building a robust data strategy.Why is a robust data strategy important? A data strategy is a business-driven initiative, and how technology is involved is an important factor. No matter what, you always start with a set of business objectives, and having the right data when you need it results in business advantages.The Big PictureA well-thought-out data strategy will have components specific to one’s own organization and application area. There are, however, important commonalities to any approach. Some of the more important ones include methods for data acquisition, data persistence, feature identification and extraction, analytics, and visualization, three of which I will discuss here.When I give talks about the data science solutions my team develops, I often reference a diagram describing how many data scientists organize the information flow through their experiments. A good data strategy needs to be informed by these concepts—your choices will either facilitate or hinder how your analysts are able to extract insights from your data!Figure 1. The standard data science workflow for experimental model creation and production solution deployment. EDA: Exploratory Data Analysis.Data Acquisition and PersistenceBefore outlining a data strategy, one needs to enumerate all the sources of data that will be important to the organization. In some businesses, these could be real-time transactions, while in others these could be free-text user feedback or log files from climate control systems. While there are countless potential sources of data, the important point is to identify all of the data that will play into the organization’s strategy at the outset. The goal is to avoid time-consuming additional steps further along in the process.In one project I worked on when I was but a wee data scientist, we needed to obtain free-text data from scientific publications and merge the documents with metadata extracted from a second source. The data extraction process was reasonably time-consuming, so we had to do this as a batch operation and store the data to disk. After we completed the process of merging together our data sources, I realized I forgot to include a data source we were going to need for annotating some of the scientific concepts in our document corpus. Because we had to do a separate merge step, our experimental workflow took a great deal more time, necessitating many avoidable late hours at the office. The big lesson here: Proactively thinking through all the data that will be important to your organization is a guaranteed way to save some headaches down the road.Once you have thought through data acquisition, it’s easier to make decisions about how (or if) these data will persist and be shared over time. To this end, there have never been more options for how one might want to keep data around. Your choices here should be informed by a few factors, including the data types in question, the speed at which new data points arrive (e.g., is it a static data set or real-time transactional data?), whether your storage needs to be optimized for reading or writing data, and which internal groups are likely to need access. In all likelihood, your organization’s solution will involve a combination of several of these data persistence options.Your choices are also likely to change in big versus small data situations. How do you know if you have big data? If it won’t fit in a standard-size grocery bag, you may have big data. In all seriousness though, my rule of thumb is, once infrastructure (i.e., the grocery bag) is a central part of your data persistence solution, one is effectively dealing with big data. There are many resources that will outline the advantages and disadvantages of your choices here. These days, many downstream feature extraction and analytical methods have libraries for transacting with the more popular choices here, so it’s best to base one’s decision on expected data types, optimizations, and data volume.Feature Identification and ExtractionIn data science, a “feature” is the information a machine learning algorithm will use during the training stage for a predictive model, as well as what it will use to make a prediction regarding a previously-unseen data point. In the case of text classification, features could be the individual words in a document; in financial analytics, a feature might be the price of a stock on a particular day.Most data strategies would do well to steer away from micromanaging how the analysts will approach this step of their work. However, there are organization-level decisions that can be made that will facilitate efficiency and creativity here. The most important approach, in my mind, is fostering an environment that encourages developers to draw from, and contribute to, the open source community. This is essential.Many of the most effective and common methods for feature extraction and data processing are well-understood, and excellent approaches have been implemented in the open source community (e.g., in Python*, R*, or Spark*). In many situations, analysts will get the most mileage out of trying one of these methods. In a research setting, they may be able to try out custom methods that are effective in a particular application domain. It will benefit both employee morale and your organization’s reputation if they are encouraged to contribute these discoveries back to the open source community.Predictive AnalyticsAgain, I think it’s key for an organization-level data strategy to avoid micromanagement of the algorithm choices analysts make in performing predictive analytics, but I would still argue that there are analytical considerations that should be included in a robust data strategy. Overseeing data governance—the management of the availability, usability, integrity, and security of your organization’s data is a central part of the CDO’s role—and analytics is where a lot of this can breakdown or reveal holes in your strategy. Even if your strategy leverages NoSQL databases, if the relationships between data points are poorly understood or not documented, it’s possible that the analysts could be missing important connections, or even prevented from accessing certain data altogether.Overarching ConsiderationsTo take a step back, a data strategy should include identification of software tools that your organization will rely upon. Intel can help here. Intel has led or contributed actively to the development of a wide range of platforms, libraries, and programming languages that provide ready-to-use resources for data analytics initiatives.To help with analytical steps and some aspects of feature identification and extraction, you can leverage the Intel® Math Kernel Library (Intel® MKL), Intel® Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (Intel® MKL-DNN) and the Intel® Data Analytics Acceleration Library (Intel® DAAL), as well as BigDL and the Intel® Distribution for Python*.Intel® MKL arms you with highly optimized, threaded, and vectorized functions to increase performance on Intel processors.Intel® MKL-DNN provides performance enhancements for accelerating deep learning frameworks on Intel architecture.Intel® DAAL delivers highly tuned functions for deep learning, classical machine learning, and data analytics performance.BigDL simplifies the development of deep learning applications for use as standard Spark programs.The Intel® Distribution for Python adds acceleration of Python application performance on Intel platforms.Ready for a deeper dive? Our “Tame the Data Deluge” whitepaper is a great place to get started. For some real-life examples of the way organizations are using data science to make better decisions in less time, visit the Intel Advanced Analytics site. 1 IDG Enterprise Data and Analytics Survey 2016.2 For an example, see Data Strategy for Business LeadersOpens in a new window, an educational offering from the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley.3 DATAVERSITY, “2017 Trends in Data Strategy,” December 13, 2016.last_img read more

CO2 Monitoring Satellite Fails

first_imgA $280 million NASA satellite designed to monitor carbon dioxide emissions failed early this morning because of a problem with the Taurus XL rocket. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory was a critical part of the space agency’s effort to gather data on climate change, and the probe’s failure is a major blow to earth scientists eager to collect more accurate data on carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. The launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California went well at first, but a few minutes into the flight the fairing that contains the satellite did not separate properly from the rocket, according to NASA officials. That means the probe is in a useless orbit or plunged into the ocean near Antarctica. NASA managers intend to set up a mishap board to understand what took place. The failure comes just as the U.S. Congress approved a funding boost for NASA’s Mission to Planet Earth.Observatory co-investigator John Burrows of the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology said in a statement : “The UK and European science community is a major partner in OCO and the loss of this instrument is a serious setback. The OCO mission aimed to make unique and high quality measurements of the atmospheric column of carbon dioxide at high spatial resolution. This information is urgently required to constrain our understanding of CO2 fluxes at the Earth’s surface (uptake by both the land surface and the oceans) and emissions from fossil fuel combustion.”A recently launched Japanese mission will collect much the same data, but Burrows said that the satellite would have collected “complementary ” information.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Is a Full-Economy Cap-and-Trade Program Dead in the Water?

first_imgProgressive David Roberts of Grist argues that Senator Lindsey Graham’s (R-SC) retreat on comprehensive energy legislation is the death knell for an economywide system that caps industrial carbon dioxide emissions from all sectors. The alternative would be a cap that covers only a portion of the electricity sector:Graham’s comments seem to point to an alternative that’s been much-discussed recently: a scaled-back cap-and-trade program that would cover only the electricity sector. That would be coupled with some version of the (pitifully weak) American Clean Energy Leadership Act passed by Bingaman’s Energy Committee last year, with additional subsidies for offshore drilling and nuclear power.Would the resulting bill be worth a damn? Put it this way: it would be possible to craft a good package of climate and energy legislation with a cap-and-trade system covering utilities, ambitious renewable energy mandates, stringent energy efficiency regulations, and a massive round of investments in clean energy.That’s not what will pass. My prediction is that whatever K/G/L come up with will look more or less like energy policy over the last 20 years: a hodgepodge of subsidies and tax breaks for favored industries. At this point there seems little hope left of anything better.Electricity generation makes up roughly a third of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Focusing on that sector alone with a cap-and-trade program would make reaching Obama’s Copenhagen pledge of a 17% cut in U.S. emissions by 2020 very difficult indeed.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Podcast: Ancient Superbugs, Mind-Controlling Microbes, and More

first_imgWhy have antibiotic-resistant bacteria been around since long before humans started using antibiotics? Can bacteria alter your mental state? And do compounds in the blood keep the brain young? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Kerry Klein. (Listen to the full Science podcast and more podcasts.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

The Top 10 ScienceNOWs of 2011

first_imgScientists Play World’s Oldest Commercial RecordResearchers have played what may be the first record intended for sale to the general public. Check out the audio clip to hear a haunting voice singing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”—a recording made 123 years ago. How Humans Got Spineless Penises and Big BrainsSome questions you probably didn’t even think to ask. Like, why does the human penis lack spines? This study has the answer, and it gives clues to the evolution of our big brains as well. Convince Your Friends You’re a Genius With Two Cans and Some SandFeel free to try this one at home. Take two tin cans, one with the top removed and the other with both ends cut out to form a tube, and shove them into sand, top first. Surprisingly, the can with the closed bottom sinks faster as your push it, the opposite of what happens in water. Now physicists know why. Hubble Confirms Nature of Mysterious Green BlobIn 2007, a Dutch school teacher spotted something strange in the night sky: a glowing green smudge of light approximately 650 million light-years away. The object, which became known as Hanny’s Voorwerp, is one of the most mysterious in the universe. Scientists say they may have finally figured out what it is. Diver Snaps First Photo of Fish Using Tools Humans and chimps use tools, sure. But fish? Yes, say researchers, who, after analyzing a video shot by a professional diver, have concluded that the blackspot tuskfish uses a rock as a tool to smash up clams. Not everyone agrees, including some of our readers. Check out the spirited discussion in the comments section. The Physics of Wine SwirlingHere’s one you can impress your friends with at a cocktail party: As you swirl your merlot, tell your companions that physicists have figured out the forces at play when we slosh our wine. And if you spill your drink, take comfort in the fact that the scientists have figured out why that happens, too. ‘Vocal Fry’ Creeping Into U.S. SpeechPerhaps it was the Britney Spears reference. Or maybe we just highlighted a curious phenomenon that people couldn’t quite put their finger on. Either way, this article about low, creaky vibrations sneaking into the conversations of U.S. women really struck a nerve. It’s our most popular story of all time. Carnivorous Plant Feasts on Bat DungThe Raffles’ pitcher plant has evolved into a curious object: a toilet for bats. The carnivorous plant is bad at catching insects, so it has developed a narrow pitcher that bats sleep in—and which they also use as a bathroom, leaving nutritious excrement behind. Sex-Crazed Astrologer Was a Stellar Records KeeperThe headline alone is one of our favorites of the year. But dig deeper and you’ll discover the fascinating story of a 17th century astrologer who has provided modern-day researchers with the most extensive set of medical records from his era. Sex After a Field Trip Yields Scientific FirstAfter returning from a field trip to Senegal, a biologist appears to have transmitted the Zika virus to his wife by having sex with her. If true, the researcher inadvertently wrote virological history, providing the first documented case of sexual transmission of an insect-borne disease. At the end of every year, we here at ScienceNOW take a look back at some of our favorite and most popular stories of the past twelve months. Here are our top 10, including our most popular story of all time. Be sure to also check out our year in photos. Enjoy the selection, and Happy Holidays!last_img read more

Sanctioned Psychiatrist Gets First NIH Grant in 3 Years

first_imgA psychiatrist whose failure to disclose drug company income contributed to a furor over conflicts of interest in biomedical research has just received his first National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant in 3 years. Charles Nemeroff’s lax reporting of at least $1.2 million in drug company payments to his employer, Emory University, and similar payments to other academic psychiatrists prompted a 2007 Senate investigation. Nemeroff stepped down as chair of psychiatry at Emory, and NIH suspended a $9-million grant he held for a depression study. In December 2008, Emory barred him from applying for NIH funding for 2 years. A year later, Nemeroff moved to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. This prompted concerns because Emory’s ban on NIH grants did not move with him. (Fueling the flames was a phone call in which National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Director Thomas Insel apparently assured the University of Miami medical school dean that Nemeroff could seek NIH funding if he moved.) Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) NIH asked for input on how to handle this situation in a revision of its conflict of interest rules, but in final rules issued last summer it did not specifically address it. Now Nemeroff is back in the fold of NIH-funded investigators. According to NIH’s grants database, he has received a $401,675 a year, 5-year standard R01 grant from NIMH to study “psychobiological risk factors for PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder].” The study is looking at genetic risk factors and doesn’t appear to involve testing drugs. The 2-year ban by Emory would have expired anyway. But Paul Thacker, a former staffer for Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) who led the Senate investigation, says NIH itself had the authority to impose a longer ban. “This shows they’re really not serious about the problem,” Thacker says.last_img read more