Legislative effort to deal with prescription drug, meth abuse moving forward

first_imgby Alicia Freese April 28, 2013 vtdigger.org An omnibus drug bill designed to tackle prescription drug and methamphetamine abuse is making headway in the Senate.The House passed H.522 in March. Since then three Senate committees have further honed the legislation. On Friday, the Senate Health and Welfare Committee voted out the bill, and it is expected to make a stop in Senate Appropriations before it arrives on the Senate floor this week.The House proposal launches new initiatives to stem opioid and methamphetamine abuse. H.522 sets minimum standards for doctors to consult the Vermont Prescription Monitoring System in order to ensure patients are not doctor-shopping for opiates. It also creates a monitoring system for meth precursor drugs that can be purchased at pharmacies; establishes a pilot program for wider distribution of a drug that reverses opioid overdoses; and requires the commissioner of the Department of Health to develop a statewide program for the disposal of unused prescription medicine. In addition, H.522 places more regulations on the sale of precious metals and makes it easier to crack down on drug activity that takes place on abandoned property.The Senate left most of the bill untouched, but the Judiciary Committee made several additions, including a provision that would allow doctors to prescribe methadone to drug addicts. It also calls for a 90 percent reduction in methadone clinic wait lists for patients. The Senate Committee on Economic Development, Housing, and General Affairs scaled back monitoring requirements for the sale of precious metals.Sen. Richard Sears, D-Bennington, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the two major changes address what he saw as a major deficiency in the House bill, which did little, in his view, to expand drug abuse treatment.The Judiciary Committee added a provision that would allow doctors to prescribe Methadone for addiction treatment in an attempt to allow patients to bypass lengthy waits for the states treatment clinics.Sears says he has high hopes for this part of the bill. This would mean that my constituents who are currently driving to Greenfield, Mass., to get treatment would be able to get it in Bennington, Sears said. And thats a huge change â ¦ I dont know of any others states that have moved in this direction.Sen. Dick Sears, D-Bennington.However Jackie Corbally, the chief of treatment for the division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs (ADAP) in the Department of Health, told VTDigger its unlikely the proposed change in state statute will result in a change for Sears constituents. Thats because, while its a straightforward process to prescribe methadone for pain, doctors are encumbered by a number of state and federal regulations that prevent them from prescribing it for addiction treatment.Lifting state regulations wouldnt free the physicians from obligations under federal law, Corbally explained.The Judiciary Committees revision also calls for a 90 percent reduction in the number of patients waiting for methadone clinic treatment.Corbally said the department expects to make significant headway on addressing the wait list problem, but the 90 percent target is optimistic.We are incredibly optimistic about what this bill will do to our system as a whole, Corbally said. We feel in combination with the hub and spoke initiative we will be able to significantly address the waiting lists.The Judiciary Committee also put a three-year expiration date on the requirement that pharmacies use a free database to track purchases of precursor drugs, which can be used to manufacture meth.The sunset provision is a nod toward concerns raised by the Vermont chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. The database allows both pharmacists and law enforcement to access data on drug purchases at a nationwide level.In a memo to the Judiciary Committee, the ACLU explains, That means all the data entered at your local drugstore when you buy behind-the-counter Sudafed is instantly available to any police officer or pharmacist using the system.Sears who supports expanding law enforcement access to the Vermont Prescription Monitoring System (VPMS) said he thinks its inconsistent to allow police warrantless access to the meth database without extending the same privilege to the VPMS.A lot of people are concerned about this huge database. Heres the real incongruity. Theyll know if Im buying Sudafed they being state police but were not giving state police access to who is buying OxyContin. So theres a concern here.Allen Gilbert, executive director of the ACLU, said the database, in addition to collecting information about drug sales, also holds onto peoples personal information, including their name, address, date of birth, and ID number.Gilbert concludes in the memo, I think its accurate to say that an increasing number of Vermonters are beginning to feel that every time the state encounters a new problem, a new database is built.The chair of the Health and Welfare Committee, Sen. Claire Ayer, D-Addison, said the House bill made really good improvements to the VPMS, and her committee didnt think any changes were necessary. The House version sets up minimum mandatory requirements for doctors to register with the database.The Economic Development Committee removed another new database from the bill. This one would have tracked the sales of precious metals, in an effort to crack down on addiction-fueled thefts. The committee also lifted some of the other regulatory requirements that the House version put on pawnbrokers.Under the Senate version, pawnbrokers are no longer required to get a license and they are subject to less rigorous bookkeeping requirements.last_img read more

Bar honors Rep. Kerner

first_imgBar honors Rep. Kerner REP. DAVE KERNER, D-Palm Springs, center, was recently recognized by Bar leaders for his ongoing advocacy for the preservation of the judicial branch as a co-equal branch of government and his help to adequately fund the judiciary. Also pictured is Bar President-elect Ramón Abadin, left, and President Greg Coleman, right. February 1, 2015 Regular Newslast_img read more

U.S. 11th Circuit to amend its rules

first_img April 1, 2017 Regular News U. S. 11th Circuit to amend its rules Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §2071(b), notice and opportunity for comment is hereby given of proposed amendments to the Rules of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit. The public comment period is from April 5 to May 5. A copy of the proposed amendments may be obtained on and after April 5 from the court’s website at www.ca11.uscourts.gov/rules/proposed-revisions. A copy may also be obtained without charge from the Office of the Clerk, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 56 Forsyth St., N.W., Atlanta, GA 30303 (phone: 404-335-6100). Comments on the proposed amendments may be submitted in writing to the clerk at the above address, or electronically at www.ca11.uscourts.gov/rules/proposed-revisions, by May 5, 2017. U.S. 11th Circuit to amend its ruleslast_img read more

News Scan for Jun 14, 2013

first_imgRubella epidemic in Japan traced to past female-only vaccination effortsJapan had 5,442 rubella cases in the first 4 months of this year, largely because past rubella vaccination programs did not target males, according to an article in today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.The main aim of rubella vaccination is to prevent congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which involves various birth defects in infants infected by their mothers, the article notes.Japan and several other countries that in the past targeted only girls and women for rubella vaccination have had large outbreaks among adolescent boys and young men.Rubella cases in Japan increased sharply in 2012, reaching 2,392. The increase has continued this year, with men between the ages of 20 and 39, who were not included in the initial rubella vaccination program, accounting for 68% of cases.Vaccination efforts targeting both boys and girls were strengthened starting in 2006, with the result that children under age 15 account for only 5.6% of the cases this year.The report says that countries using rubella vaccine should work to prevent outbreaks by aiming for high immunity in all age-groups and both sexes.Jun 14 MMWR articleCDC reports infection findings in tainted steroid outbreakThe US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported one more suspected infection linked to tainted injectable steroids produced by Main Street Family Pharmacy and said that skin wound tests have found bacteria and fungi in 4 of the 26 patients so far, according to an update yesterday. The number of affected states stayed at four.Most patients have had skin and soft-tissue infections following intramuscular injection of the contaminated methylprednisolone acetate. Two of the patients had Enterobacter cloacae andKlebsiella pneumoniae, one had an unidentified mixed bacterial infection, and one had a fungal finding highly suggestive of Aspergillus, according to the CDC. Further confirmation is under way.The CDC said that though bacteria and fungi have been isolated from unopened vials, it’s not possible to determine which infections are due to the contamination and which could be from other factors, such as improper handling or medication administration.CDC reminded clinicians to use individual containers of compounded or preservative-free medicine for single patients only and to promptly report any infections that might be related to a medication or device, even outside of a recognized outbreak.Jun 13 CDC outbreak updateViral pneumonia sickens 21 health workers at Chinese hospitalLocal health officials in China’s Anhui province said today that 21 healthcare workers from the same hospital in the city of Suzhou have been hospitalized with viral pneumonia, Xinhua, China’s state news agency reported.A statement from city health officials said all worked in the hospital’s respiratory care department, and none of the illnesses are critical. The first patient was a nurse who came down with a fever, cough, and headache on Jun 5. No new cases have been reported since Jun 11.The city’s disease control center is testing samples from the patients, though tests at another hospital’s lab indicate that the patients have viral pneumonia.A spokesperson from Anhui province’s health bureau told Xinhua that the illness is a common pneumonia and does not pose a public health threat.Jun 14 Xinhua storyDemocratic Republic of Congo reports yellow fever outbreakThe Democratic of Congo’s health ministry is launching a yellow fever vaccination campaign in response to an outbreak that has so far resulted in 51 suspected cases and 19 deaths in three of the country’s health zones, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today.So far six of the infections have been lab-confirmed. The index patient is a 16-year-old boy from the village of Kisengua in the northeast part of the country who got sick on Mar 1.The mass vaccination campaign starts Jun 20 and will target 503,426 people in the three health zones, the WHO said. The International Coordinating Group on Yellow Fever Provision will dispense 559,000 doses to the health ministry, which will coordinate the campaign with assistance of global health partners.The last report of yellow fever in the country was Jul 2010, according to previous WHO reports. The Republic of Congo, the DRC’s neighbor to the west, reported an outbreak in December 2012.Jun 14 WHO statementlast_img read more

Waterloo Industries Promotes Two Executives

first_imgWATERLOO, IOWA — Waterloo Industries has announced the promotion of two employees to key executive positions. Gary Marcus has been promoted to vice president, marketing and business development, and Deonna Fritz has been promoted to vice president, new product development. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Waterloo Industries manufactures tool storage products and is an operating unit of consumer products company Fortune Brands, Inc. Marcus joined Waterloo Industries as manager, marketing in August of 1999, and most recently served as director, marketing and business development. In his new role as vice president, marketing and business development, Marcus will be responsible for identifying and developing new business opportunities through global market research, analysis and strategic partnerships. He will report to Waterloo Industries President and COO Jerry Heinlen. Fritz began her career with Waterloo Industries in 1987 as an intern. Since then, she has earned several promotions to key marketing positions within the company. Her most recent position was director, sales – Sears Business Group. In her new role as vice president, new product development, Fritz will lead initiatives to identify and develop innovative new products, line extensions and differentiation strategies. Fritz will oversee the Design, Development and Product Management groups and will also report to Heinlen. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

Sweet Charities

first_imgGolf OutingGuild Hall hosts its annual Maidstone Club Golf Outing on Thursday, October 11, from 11 AM to 8 PM. Golf at the historic, oceanfront Maidstone Club in East Hampton. The outing begins with registration and practice. At noon, lunch will be served on the Clubhouse veranda overlooking the ocean, followed by a 1 PM shotgun start to the tournament. Afterward, golfers enjoy cocktails on the Clubhouse veranda, followed by dinner and awards. For more information, contact Kristen Lee Curcie at kcurcie@guildhall.org or 631-324-0806 ext. 24.Hamptons Ride And WineHamptons Ride and Wine, founded by i-tri board member and professional triathlete Sarah Piampiano, will offer a choice of a 25-mile or 60-mile group ride followed by a picnic lunch and wine tasting at Channing Daughters Winery in Bridgehampton on Saturday, October 13. The event is open to all. The group ride begins at 8:30 AM. For tickets, log onto www.itrigirls.org.Jelly StrongThe Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead presents Jelly Strong “Think Pink” Weekend on Saturday, October 13 and Sunday, October 14, from 10 AM to 5 PM in honor of Jelly the River Otter, who successfully overcame breast cancer. Guests who wear pink will receive 20 percent off admission. Keychains and buttons will be sold featuring Jelly, with proceeds being donated to the North Fork Breast Health Coalition. You can visit Jelly, along with her son Stark, at the Otter Falls exhibit.Pet Philanthropy CirclePet Philanthropy Circle presents its Pet Hero Awards sixth anniversary ceremony on Friday, October 19, at Gotham Hall in New York City. Join honorary chair Naomi Judd along with co-hosts David Frei and Jewel Morris. Terri, Bindi, and Robert Irwin will be receiving the Inaugural Humanitarian Family of the Year Award for their tireless commitment to saving animals across the globe. The Pet Hero Awards showcase outstanding contributions inspiring everyone to become involved in defending the rights of animals. Visit www.PetCircle.org/Tickets.Shelter Island 5KThe 19th Annual Shelter Island 5K Run/Walk, a USA track and field certified course, will be held on Saturday, October 20, at 11 AM. The race is held in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and supports the North Fork Breast Health Coalition, the Coalition for Women’s Breast Health at Southampton Hospital, and Lucia’s Angels. All proceeds go directly to patient care via these local breast health organizations. The beautiful and scenic 5K course starts on a tree-lined street with stunning fall foliage and finishes along the beautiful Crescent Beach. Visit www.shelterislandrun.com for more info.Real Men Wear PinkThis year’s Real Men Wear Pink cocktail party will be held at The Clubhouse at 175 Daniels Hole Road in East Hampton on Saturday, October 20, from 5:30 to 7:30 PM. In loving memory of Teresa Montant, Cecilia Avallone Babinski, and Karin Anderson, the event features cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, raffles, and a silent auction. Money raised will benefit The Coalition for Women’s Cancers, Lucia’s Angels, and the Stony Brook Southampton Hospital’s Ellen Hermanson Foundation.Tickets are $100. Contact 631-324-0803.Sag Wag N’ WalkThe Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps presents the Sag Wag N’ Walk dog walk on Sunday, October 21, at 9 AM at Havens Beach in Sag Harbor. Pre-register by emailing sagwagandwalk@gmail.com. The cost is $20; day of registration is $25. There will be pooch activities following the walk at Havens Beach.Girls Night OutGurney’s Montauk presents its annual Girls Night Out benefit on November 16. The event benefits The Coalition for Women’s Cancers at Southampton Hospital. Enjoy wine and cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, raffles, spa pampering, dancing, psychic readings, and more. Tickets start at $45. Visit www.gurneysresorts.com.Long Island Sound ChorusThe Long Island Sound Chorus will host its 2018 Membership Drive for three consecutive Wednesdays from October 10 through October 24 from 7 to 10 PM. Free vocal lessons will be given. The chorus meets at Anderson Warner Hall in Hampton Bays. For more information, call Thea at 631-267-6502 or visit www.longislandsoundchorus.org. Sharelast_img read more

Yara-BASF break ground on Texas ammonia plant

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

The other side of the story

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

With recession a near certainty, the question is how deep

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

School brings light to settlements’ children

first_imgThe Children of Light School in Rondebosch East celebrated their first anniversary on Wednesday October 17. Children from the Pooke se Bos and Hadji Ebrahim Crescent informal settlements are being educated, and provided with a safe place at the Children of Light School to explore and be children, instead of playing on the streets and constantly having to keep their guard up.However, the non-profit organisation, which was established on October 17 last year and is based in Rondebosch East, needs your help to stay afloat.The Children of Light School has taken in nine children from these settlements and here they are allowed to play, and are taken on excursions every two weeks to boost their social knowledge and experiences, said principal of the school, Mala Makan.The school operates from Tuesday to Friday from 8am to noon. “We also provide transport for them to and from school which costs us R4 000 a month and if we have meetings we have to pick up their parents as well because they don’t have transport. We work with the parents and community leaders to make sure that we don’t take over their lives completely and that they are still responsible for their children and we still respect them,” she said. Ms Makan said donations in the form of groceries such as lentils, rice, flour, fish oil, fruit and vegetables, toiletries and transport sponsorships were needed as the children also received a meal at school every day. At the moment they depend on funding and donations from the community and friends and family. “We teach them how to be better human beings by offering a value-based education which takes a holistic approach. We want to intervene at foundation level and provide quality education, therefore we only have nine children. “During the first six months it was so difficult because they completely rebelled against us and used foul language and would fight all the time but through yoga therapy, music, and education they have managed to let their guard down and trust us and be open to knowledge because they are happy,” she said. Ms Makan said some children were exposed to social ills such as abuse, and neglect and they are emotionally traumatised. She said many of them had never experienced visiting anything outside of their communities such as the mountain or the ocean. The parents of the children are supportive and attend all school meetings as they are interested in their children’s development and notice the change the school has made, and in return this has had a positive effect on the entire family, said Ms Makan. “This is a safe space for them. We speak nicely with no shouting because that is what they get at home. Yoga therapy has really helped them but we can only do it for a short time as they get bored easily. When they go into the garden they are so calm and relaxed,” she said. One of the parents, Debbie Phillips, who stays in Hadji Ebrahim Crescent, said when her son first attended the school last year he couldn’t speak English but he now can. “He was also very naughty but now he is well-behaved. He really likes school a lot,” she said. For more information or to make a donation, call Mala Makan on 084 919 4864.last_img read more